Jump to content


Photo

F. J. Richtig


  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#1 dsloan

dsloan
  • Members
  • 91 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 April 2008 - 08:44 PM

I think F.J. Richtig from Clarkson Ne. needs to be noted under the old master. Having made knives from 1927 to 1977. He made his living making and selling his knives for fifty years, during a period when custom makers were few and far between. His main credit would be in his secret tempering method. Where ever he'd set up his wares he'd bring an anvil along and proceed to cut a piece of metal in two and still retain an edge sharp enough to shred paper. One of his other key note features was his cast aluminum handles.

Anyone with any thoughts, pictures or comments. Feel free.

Dave from Diller

#2 Richard Furrer

Richard Furrer
  • Supporting Member
  • 1,991 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rural Wisconsin
  • Interests:General blacksmith with an intense interest in steel making and swords of various periods.

Posted 07 April 2008 - 01:55 PM

I think F.J. Richtig from Clarkson Ne. needs to be noted under the old master. Having made knives from 1927 to 1977. He made his living making and selling his knives for fifty years, during a period when custom makers were few and far between. His main credit would be in his secret tempering method. Where ever he'd set up his wares he'd bring an anvil along and proceed to cut a piece of metal in two and still retain an edge sharp enough to shred paper. One of his other key note features was his cast aluminum handles.

Anyone with any thoughts, pictures or comments. Feel free.

Dave from Diller


I read an article on some metallographic/chemical work done on his blades.....by Wadsworth and Lesuer in Materials Characterization......back in 2000 I think...


Ric
Richard Furrer
Door County Forgeworks
Sturgeon Bay, WI

#3 Will Leavitt

Will Leavitt
  • Members
  • 236 posts
  • Location:Deatsville, Alabama

Posted 07 April 2008 - 03:06 PM

Wasn't he in a Ripley's believe it or not article? He used to cut axles or other large pieces of metal with his blades? I can't remember where I saw that article referencing his knives. I think the Ripley's thing was in the 50s (I saw a reprint in conjunction with the article, I wasn't around in the 50s :) )

#4 dsloan

dsloan
  • Members
  • 91 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 08 April 2008 - 07:26 PM

There was an article in Materials Characterization in 2000 on Richtig knives. I have a copy in front of me now if anyone would like a copy please let me know. Very interesting read. The steel that he used was 1095 heat treated using a austempered according to the article. Other interesting articles are in Knives '84, '88 and '89. There was also a magazine article on Richtig and Nichols released in the early '90s called combat knives. It was like a special issue of Blade magazine. You'll find that most of the articles were written by one of the leading authorities and collectors of Richtig and Nichols knives. A Harlan "Sid" Suedmeier owner of Little Giant Trip hammers in Nebraska City.

Richtig's article in Ripley's appeared in 1936. It's also stated that he cut 8800-Lbs of steel over his career. In one article he cut a lock from a jail cell because the deputy had lost the key. Which was displayed for years in his shop. In 1938 he was declare a Master Ironsmith by the National Blacksmith and Welders Association.

The thing I think that is interesting is that he was using what I consider a modern H.T. method in and around 1936.

Thanks for looking

Dave from Diller

#5 Howard Clark

Howard Clark
  • Supporting Member
  • 1,417 posts

Posted 09 April 2008 - 06:06 AM

Salt baths and lead baths were in use long before. Austempering was a relatively new thing, at least in terms of understanding what and how. Bain did his work at USS in the 30's and 40's. Richtig may not have known about Bain's work, and made the fortuitous discovery on his own. I do not know, and neither does anyone we can ask, so far as I know.

You have to watch out for those simple country folk. They can fool you. ;)

#6 Jziegenbein

Jziegenbein
  • Members
  • 570 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:cumming, GA (north of atlanta)

Posted 12 April 2008 - 10:57 PM

i read something about him in a blade article from 1994 or something. it had a picture of him chopping a steel bar in half with one of his knives. really neat stuff :o
jared Z.

lilzee on britishblades.

From now on, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.
-Sir Winston Churchill

#7 Don Hanson

Don Hanson
  • Supporting Member
  • 1,436 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Success Mo
  • Interests:Fishin, Forgin and Shootin

Posted 14 April 2008 - 06:15 PM

Very interesting Dave and yes, Richtig should be mentioned here.
Sid has shared his collection with me over the years, Richtig was a very prolific maker. Good stuff.
Don Hanson lll My Webpage

#8 Pat B

Pat B
  • Members
  • 559 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:middle of nowhere WI
  • Interests:Smithing, Sword collecting, blacksmithing, archery, knife throwing

    world domination through squeaky toys

Posted 22 February 2009 - 03:51 PM

I actually own one of his knives. It was given to me by a former teacher I know who found it in his house and thought I would enjoy it more than him.

Overall length 12.5 inches
Handle length 4 3/8 inches
blade length 8 1/8 inches
spine thickness 1/8 inch at guard tapering to 1/16inch at the tip

blade is 1 1/8 in wide for most of the length coming to 1/8 inch wide at tip


heres some pics.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Edited by Pat B, 23 February 2009 - 01:21 AM.

Gnáthamh na hoibre an t-eólas
(Knowledge comes through practice)

Iron is full of impurities that weaken it; through the forging fire, it becomes steel and is transformed into a razor-sharp sword. Human beings develop in the same fashion. - Morihei Ueshiba

my site: http://lfcforgeworks.webs.com/

#9 dsloan

dsloan
  • Members
  • 91 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 22 February 2009 - 11:38 PM

That is one outstanding example of Richtig's work.

Thanks for sharing

Dave from Diller

#10 dsloan

dsloan
  • Members
  • 91 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 22 February 2009 - 11:42 PM

Pat,

Could you share the dimensions with us? Blade thickness? Blade length?

Dave from Diller

#11 Pat B

Pat B
  • Members
  • 559 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:middle of nowhere WI
  • Interests:Smithing, Sword collecting, blacksmithing, archery, knife throwing

    world domination through squeaky toys

Posted 23 February 2009 - 01:19 AM

Sure Id be happy to, measurements are as accurate as I can get them.

Overall length 12.5 inches
Handle length 4 3/8 inches
blade length 8 1/8 inches
spine thickness 1/8 inch at guard tapering to 1/16inch at the tip

blade is 1 1/8 in wide for most of the length coming to 1/8 inch wide at tip

Hope this satisfies the dimension curiosity, if more stats are needed feel free to ask

Pat B

Edited by Pat B, 23 February 2009 - 01:20 AM.

Gnáthamh na hoibre an t-eólas
(Knowledge comes through practice)

Iron is full of impurities that weaken it; through the forging fire, it becomes steel and is transformed into a razor-sharp sword. Human beings develop in the same fashion. - Morihei Ueshiba

my site: http://lfcforgeworks.webs.com/

#12 Sam Salvati

Sam Salvati

    Fourm Board

  • Supporting Member
  • 5,133 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yulan NY, 12792

Posted 23 February 2009 - 10:36 AM

Those dimensions sound IMPECCABLE, that must be an awesome knife.
Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

#13 dsloan

dsloan
  • Members
  • 91 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 23 February 2009 - 08:42 PM

Like I said before outstanding. You have quite a find there.

The info you requested will be in the mail tomorrow.

Thanks

Dave from Diller

#14 Pat B

Pat B
  • Members
  • 559 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:middle of nowhere WI
  • Interests:Smithing, Sword collecting, blacksmithing, archery, knife throwing

    world domination through squeaky toys

Posted 23 February 2009 - 09:10 PM

it is quite a nice blade to use... and thx dave
Gnáthamh na hoibre an t-eólas
(Knowledge comes through practice)

Iron is full of impurities that weaken it; through the forging fire, it becomes steel and is transformed into a razor-sharp sword. Human beings develop in the same fashion. - Morihei Ueshiba

my site: http://lfcforgeworks.webs.com/

#15 dsloan

dsloan
  • Members
  • 91 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 March 2009 - 06:56 PM

post_25124_1238111532.jpg
I've attached a picture of the Richtig Display. I paid Sid a visit and he was kind enough to let me photograph it. Hopefully it's not to large for those of you with dial up.

Dave from diller

#16 savageknives

savageknives
  • Members
  • 14 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:abilene, tejas

Posted 29 June 2009 - 05:31 PM

i recently found an issue of Knives '84. he was featured in there but, of course, the first page of the article was torn out. no doubt hung on the original owners shop wall as inspiration or used as a reference for a piece of information given. i understand he took his HT method to his grave. its a shame. too bad.
there is but one craftsman who can be called the king of craftsmen.

#17 Pat B

Pat B
  • Members
  • 559 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:middle of nowhere WI
  • Interests:Smithing, Sword collecting, blacksmithing, archery, knife throwing

    world domination through squeaky toys

Posted 29 June 2009 - 05:51 PM

from what I understand, when metallurgical studies were done on his blades they resembled those of wootz blades of the middle east. Thats definitely one heck of a HT job to do
Gnáthamh na hoibre an t-eólas
(Knowledge comes through practice)

Iron is full of impurities that weaken it; through the forging fire, it becomes steel and is transformed into a razor-sharp sword. Human beings develop in the same fashion. - Morihei Ueshiba

my site: http://lfcforgeworks.webs.com/

#18 Bryan Bondurant

Bryan Bondurant
  • Supporting Member
  • 960 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 29 June 2009 - 10:46 PM

You guys keep the history coming, when the history section was started this is exactly the kind of information the forum was looking for. If anyone can scan old articles, pictures, or get new pictures and upload them that would be great. Of course making copies of books that are still in print is a no go because of copy right issues but you can add the name of the book, a picture of the cover a book, basic information and page numbers.

#19 VBG

VBG
  • Members
  • 3 posts

Posted 16 August 2009 - 05:28 AM

Hi guys,
I'm living in Belgium and I red about Frank Richtig in a book called Knife Talk written by ....of course ....Ed Fowler (page 75).Read about the test they did!
I think it's time to change the title of this article: "The best knifemaker nobody remembers" since some of us will remember him .
Looking at the pic of the display it seems to me he made knives for people using in kitchen as well as hunters etc....
Somehow this reminds me of(no offence meant) Buck knives since they cut nails in two with the"famous for holding an edge"slogan.(no?)OK maybe not exactly the same but if you can make a knife as good you're on the right track.
VBG

#20 Mikey

Mikey
  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 21 August 2009 - 10:45 AM

Hi guys,
I'm living in Belgium and I red about Frank Richtig in a book called Knife Talk written by ....of course ....Ed Fowler (page 75).Read about the test they did!
I think it's time to change the title of this article: "The best knifemaker nobody remembers" since some of us will remember him .
Looking at the pic of the display it seems to me he made knives for people using in kitchen as well as hunters etc....
Somehow this reminds me of(no offence meant) Buck knives since they cut nails in two with the"famous for holding an edge"slogan.(no?)OK maybe not exactly the same but if you can make a knife as good you're on the right track.
VBG






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users