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F. J. Richtig


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#21 Mikey

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Posted 21 August 2009 - 11:03 AM

I am new to this forum but have (3) F.J. Richtig knives. Two of them are kitchen/utility knives with the cast aluminum handles that he was known for. One is a hunter, with leather handle and brass hardware, and it came with the bolt that was cut by it. I was fortunate to get this knife before somebody completely polished off the F.J.R. markings on the pommel. I hope my photos post OK.

Mikey - Littleton, CO

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  • Richtig_hunter_fighter.jpg


#22 Pat B

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 03:18 PM

mikey, looks like a nice blade, could u post more angle of it, specifically the FJR markings and the aluminum blades you have of his?
Gnáthamh na hoibre an t-eólas
(Knowledge comes through practice)

Iron is full of impurities that weaken it; through the forging fire, it becomes steel and is transformed into a razor-sharp sword. Human beings develop in the same fashion. - Morihei Ueshiba

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#23 dsloan

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Posted 21 January 2010 - 06:20 PM

Pat B.

If you are looking for some specific stampings I can get you photo's of all three stamps that Richtig used. Later this year I hope to get some pictures of some of Richtigs more rare pieces.

Dave from Diller

#24 Pat B

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Posted 11 March 2010 - 09:18 AM

dave,

Yes, I was looking to see what stamps he used and any variations they have.
Gnáthamh na hoibre an t-eólas
(Knowledge comes through practice)

Iron is full of impurities that weaken it; through the forging fire, it becomes steel and is transformed into a razor-sharp sword. Human beings develop in the same fashion. - Morihei Ueshiba

my site: http://lfcforgeworks.webs.com/

#25 dsloan

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 04:42 PM

Here are photos of the three stamps Richtig used. The two large stamps are seen alot together and the small stamp is used a lot on his earlier knives along with most of the leather washer handle ones.

The last photo is of Sid the owner of the Richtig Display board. The photos were taken of knives actually on the board.

Dave from Diller

Attached Images

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#26 dsloan

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Posted 13 May 2010 - 04:44 PM

Folks here are some photos of my Collection of Richtigs.

The scraper is a rare one. Richtig also made some odd pieces with aluminum handles. I've seen paint scrapers, leather cutting knives and grouting knives. He is also known to make a hatchet and serving forks from time to time.

Dave from Diller

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  • Hammer pics 017.JPG
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#27 mcolliv

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 07:22 AM

I have this old knife I inherited from my grandfather who served in WWII. It has ABSOLUTELY NO MARKINGS LEFT ON IT. In fact the only way I came to the possible conclusion that it could be a F.J. Richtig is the Alfred Cornish sheath and an internet search gave me this forum. So here is a picture with the sheath. If you have questions, feel free to ask. I'm just want to know if this is or might be a F.J.R. Knife.

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#28 dsloan

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 08:33 AM

Wow, Nice story. Every indication points to an Original leather handled Richtig. You accurate when you notice the Cornish sheath alot of the original sheaths did not make it. That is a really good example. The handle of the knife really points to a Richtig. The long tang extending through the butt cap is a really good indication and the spacer material and how it is stacked.

I believe you have a wonderful example of Richtigs work.

Thanks for sharing

Dave from Diller

#29 laibdo

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Posted 21 October 2010 - 10:48 PM

Hello Dave. I have a number of Richtig knives available. Sounds like you have an interest in his work.

#30 dsloan

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Posted 22 October 2010 - 11:45 PM

Yes Sir, I have been collecting his work for several years now. Not on the level of others though. But I have seen some very interesting pieces.

Dave from Diller

#31 Pat B

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 07:33 PM

Just added another Richtig to my collection. Not the most expensive of his work but I enjoy it all the same.

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Gnáthamh na hoibre an t-eólas
(Knowledge comes through practice)

Iron is full of impurities that weaken it; through the forging fire, it becomes steel and is transformed into a razor-sharp sword. Human beings develop in the same fashion. - Morihei Ueshiba

my site: http://lfcforgeworks.webs.com/

#32 Alan Longmire

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 12:44 PM

Gentlemen (and ladies, if anyone's watching)

I got an email today from a gentleman who wished to remain anonymous but who had some information to pass on in hopes you enjoy it. He requested no contact, so don't ask for it. :)

I do not wish to join the forum for a single post but would like to share a bit of information about Frank. My mother's family were from the Clarkson community and had known him for years and proudly used his knives daily.

I grew up in Leigh Nebraska which is six miles west of where Frank had his shop in Clarkson Nebraska. One time when I had gone to the bank in Clarkson to deposit a check for grain that I had sold, upon leaving the town I noted the smoke rising from the chimney of Frank's shop. Realizing that he was well advanced in age and not likely to continue his trade for much longer, and since I had a bit of cash available, I stopped to see him and purchase knives for my family. I purchased a set of five for my wife and sets of three for each of my five children to have when they grew up and had homes of their own.
For myself I purchased a fillet knife and a hunting knife with the leather handle and in a sheath made by a Mr Novak in that community. Frank personallized the hunting knife for me by adding my initials to it. The hunting knife was unfortunately lost when the sheath became unsnapped while on a hunt in north central nebraska.

While I was in his shop Frank was processing knives and proceeded to explain to me in detail the steel he used, how he shaped the blades, the heat treatment process time and temperature in his electric oven, the quenching process and medium, and the drawing temperature he sought for several types of blades depending on their ultimate use. I even got to watch him remove one set of blades form the oven and quench them. I remember many of these details but not all and have never had the time or opportunity to experiment on my own. I fully intended to be at his sale and buy the electric furnace and several other items, however, the company for which I worked at the time had me scheduled to be our of town on the date of the sale.

For the record, although he may at one time have used 1095 steel, that was not what he told me he was using at that time.

I am attaching a photograph of a few of the Richtig knives that I gathered together around the house.
The Old Farmer


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#33 dsloan

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 04:02 PM

Alan,

When you speak to the Old Farmer again thank him for his story and photo's.

It's quite interesting to note how many people's lives Mr. Richtig's knives have touched.

President Eisenhower even had a Richtig knife.

Dave from Diller

#34 dsloan

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Posted 04 January 2015 - 07:34 PM

Here's an article that was floating around FB.

 

It's a really well writing article and informative.

 

https://clarksonhist...-richtig-knife/

 

Dave from Diller



#35 Dennis Mitchell

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 12:49 PM

Great article. Thanks for posting! A small tip of the hat to the stock removal method. Would have been great to be a fly on the wall in his shop for a day.

#36 Jesper

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 04:06 AM

Oh my. Those knives were awsome. Has anyone replicated the results?

#37 Mike Andriacco

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Posted 13 January 2015 - 06:05 PM

Alan, please beg The Old Farmer to write down what he can remember now, so it won't be lost again...

#38 Rudolf Harmse

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Posted 14 January 2015 - 07:37 AM

Oh my. Those knives were awsome. Has anyone replicated the results?

 

I believe there are knives and smith's who can achieve this kind of performance still.


Less haste, more speed.

#39 R.H.Graham

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Posted 19 January 2015 - 09:11 PM

 
I believe there are knives and smith's who can achieve this kind of performance still.


Most certainly, as cool as he was, he wasn't doing anything majic.
Randal
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#40 dsloan

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 12:43 AM

I'm sure alot of what he was doing was showmanship.  But try to cut a railroad spike like he did in his demo's, at a certain point you have to have it hanging off the anvil.  I've found out one thing you have to strike your and blade at a straight angle, a glancing blow will make a wreck of thing.  The largest piece of steel I've tried is a 16 penny nail.

 

Dave from diller






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