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#21 WPeterson

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 09:30 AM

Very nice work and a good fit with all the handle pieces. Thanks for taking the time to post the whole process.

For attaching the handle, do the two small pins in the center of the guard go all the way through the tang or is it only held on with the epoxy?
Wes Peterson

www.wpbladesmith.com
Southeast Georgia

#22 Geoff Keyes

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 01:37 PM

The two center pins capture the tang, and the whole thing is held with epoxy.

Geoff
"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

I said that.

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.
- - -G. K. Chesterton

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

Grant Sarver

#23 jaka

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 06:04 AM

Absolutely beautiful work. I really appreciate the time and effort to bring this to us in pictures and the explaination of each step.

Did I understand that you normalized three times after heat treat and then edge quenched in Canola oil? I'm confused. Thanks for all your hard work.

#24 Geoff Keyes

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 10:11 AM

Jaka,

For most of my blades I normalize 3 times after forging, and 3 more times after grinding, just before HT. Then edge quenched in mineral oil (which actually is a mix of mineral oil and veggie oil, because I needed more volume for a project) and tempered at 425. Some folks think the second normalize cycles are not needed. It is a process I developed when I building my JS test blades, and I've kept it, especially for longer blades. I also used it to get my eye calibrated to the color of my HT forge, in the days before I installed the pyrometer. On smaller blades these days I go with a single normalize after grinding and before HT.

Clear as mud, huh?

Geoff
"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

I said that.

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.
- - -G. K. Chesterton

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

Grant Sarver

#25 jaka

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 07:28 AM

Jaka,

For most of my blades I normalize 3 times after forging, and 3 more times after grinding, just before HT. Then edge quenched in mineral oil (which actually is a mix of mineral oil and veggie oil, because I needed more volume for a project) and tempered at 425. Some folks think the second normalize cycles are not needed. It is a process I developed when I building my JS test blades, and I've kept it, especially for longer blades. I also used it to get my eye calibrated to the color of my HT forge, in the days before I installed the pyrometer. On smaller blades these days I go with a single normalize after grinding and before HT.

Clear as mud, huh?

Geoff


Thanks so much for the explanation. I must have read more into it than was actually there. I appreciate the response. Sounds like you've pretty much worked the bugs out of it making the process easier for those of us who don't have the patience to try new methods.

Regards and good work.




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