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Ginunting


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#1 Stephen Renico

Stephen Renico
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Posted 16 August 2008 - 08:13 AM

By far, forward-leaning blades are my favorite to make. I first learned about this style of blade when I began practicing pekiti-tirsia and became acquainted with the art's primary long blade, the ginunting.

This is a ginunting made out of stock I removed from a large concrete-cutting saw blade.

OAL: 25"
BLADE: 17", recycled from a concrete-cutting saw blade
HANDLE: 8" Oak.
SHEATH: Birch, wrapped with hemp cord

For more pictures and information, go HERE. Thanks for looking.

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Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who did not.

#2 jrassett

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 01:53 PM

Looks deadly, I like the flow of it, real smooth, nice job!
J Anderson R

" Fools live to regret there words, wise men to regret there silence"- Will Henry

#3 Patrick Brooks

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Posted 16 August 2008 - 02:35 PM

Nice one Stephen.
Looking at the pics in your link I noticed the smithy with the rivet forge , big hunk o' steel on stumps and engineers hammer . Just goes to show that it's not the tools that make the difference. I always love to see these kind of pics where the smith works with what he can scrounge but turns out a beautiful product . Wonder what OSHA might have to say about the flip-flops though lol.

Edited by Patrick Brooks, 16 August 2008 - 02:38 PM.

"A man can never have too many vises"
Thomas Brooks 1/29/38 - 7/7/05
Had a few vices and collected vises
Miss you Tom

#4 Stephen Renico

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 07:28 AM

Looks deadly, I like the flow of it, real smooth, nice job!


Thank you. It took a lot of drafts before settling on a design I liked. Now that I've finished this one, I have some new ideas for the next ones I make.
Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who did not.

#5 Stephen Renico

Stephen Renico
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  • Location:New Chernobyl (Detroit)
  • Interests:knifemaking, filipino martial arts, history

Posted 20 August 2008 - 07:29 AM

Nice one Stephen.
Looking at the pics in your link I noticed the smithy with the rivet forge , big hunk o' steel on stumps and engineers hammer . Just goes to show that it's not the tools that make the difference. I always love to see these kind of pics where the smith works with what he can scrounge but turns out a beautiful product . Wonder what OSHA might have to say about the flip-flops though lol.


Oh, those guys are great! Reminds me of the pictures of the Nepalese smiths. Also reminds me of the bare bones types of makers out there like Tim Lively, Wayne Goddard, and Tai Goo.
Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who did not.




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