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kitty litter forge liner


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#1 Mjohnson

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Posted 16 June 2009 - 02:25 PM

I am making another BBQ forge, other one got thrown away during during major cleaup, :angry: and i don't remember the amount of stuuf to put in it I ave kitty litter, sand, cement, and perlite. Is there anything else i need and what is the ratio for the ingredients if there is a link or another post plz let me know. :o THX
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#2 Matt Bower

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Posted 16 June 2009 - 02:38 PM

It ain't rocket science, man. All you really need is kitty litter and sand. Mix it up till it'll hold its shape when squeezed into a clump, but not much wetter than that. 50/50 on the sand and kitty litter will work, but you can probably get away with more sand and less litter. Stir in some perlite if you want. I wouldn't bother with cement; it doesn't tolerate heat well. (Well, unless it's a high alumina or other refractory cement, but that'd be overkill and it's probably not what you have.)

Edited by Matt Bower, 16 June 2009 - 02:39 PM.


#3 Mjohnson

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Posted 16 June 2009 - 02:48 PM

thx man couldn't remember what all i put in it last time.
Nothing worthwhile can be accomplished in martial arts unless your spirit is on fire.

"Victory goes to the one who has no thought of himself."- Shinkage School of Swordsmanship

#4 Kurt

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 12:01 PM

http://www.backyardm...fractories.html
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#5 Matt Bower

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Posted 19 June 2009 - 02:19 PM

Skip the cement in Lionel's recipe. I'm a member over there. We've been scratching our heads about his cement recommendation for a long time, but for whatever reason he won't take it down. Portland cement (which is the binder in the masonry cement he mentions) is an hydraulic cement. It works by chemically bonding with water. When you heat it to about 300 degrees F those chemical bonds start to break down. The cement loses its strength, and the steam that is released can cause it to spall. What's more, the calcium oxide in Portland makes it a powerful flux for silica-based materials, such as the sand and clay in the refractory mix. This is a very poor material to include in a forge or furnace.




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