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Vertical Forge


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#1 MassArtTom

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 09:22 PM

Does anyone have any plans or ideas for making a vertical forge that could heat treat a 4ft+ blade?

#2 jake cleland

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 09:33 PM

why vertical? for a blade that size, you have a problem getting the blade out of the forge and into the quench fast enough, and i'm not sure that they heat as evenly as horizontal forges. there are plans for a simple and extremely effective h-t forge on Don's site.
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#3 MassArtTom

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 09:38 PM

Hmm, well I was thinking it might open up sideways or something, idk, we just need something for swords as our bladeforge is only like 16 inches deep and our horizontal quench tank combition tends to make warpy as shit h-ts of long blades

#4 Alan Longmire

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 08:09 AM

Don, Jesus, and Kerry have nice horizontal setups, but Ben Potter and Graham Fredeen have posted really nice vertical setups in the last year or so as well. Look 'em up!

#5 owen bush

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Posted 28 May 2010 - 04:06 AM

I have considered this one long and hard and I think that a vertical set up will probably be one of your tasks in the UK . The problem with a vertical forge running gas is going to be convection differentials between the top and bottom .
a 4 foot blade will warp I think whatever you do .
The fogg forge is an exceptional thing simple and easy and very good .
i think that salts is probably the answer if going bigger or vertical .
with a 4 foot blade you are getting very close to the handling limits of a normal framed human and without a crane setup o buried furnace or step ladder of some long tongs you are going to hit problems .
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#6 MassArtTom

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 12:22 PM

Hah! That would definitely be interesting to help make while I'm over with you this summer! Like I said, I'm not hugely sure how it would work, maybe it ends up being salts. But we can most certainly stand on tables and such to get a higher footing in our shop. Yea the guy who forged the saber like toothed sword is making a zweihander and we deffinately need some sort of setup to harden it.

What about kiln coils? It doesnt need to be gas, why not make an electric one.

Edited by MassArtTom, 05 June 2010 - 12:23 PM.


#7 Kenon Rain

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 01:31 PM

I think dee posted a sweet tutorial on making an electric heat treatment kiln on here a while ago for sword length blades..

speaking of which, she has disappeared huh? haven't seen her post in about 3 months o.O
guess the zombies got her..
Blam!

#8 B. Norris

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 03:53 PM

One big reason for the vertical setup, for me at least, is that long blades very easily bend under their own weight and they must be kept perfectly on edge. One little sway to the side and the sword has to be taken to the anvil and straightened back out before continuing with the heat treat. Especially European swords that are straight as opposed to something like a Katana. With a vertical setup, this is not a problem. Yes, you would need a ladder to get the sword out and into the quench.

I have been considering a vertical sword furnace for awhile. What I would really like is a high temperature salt pot. However, I do not know if I would use it frequently enough to justify the cost and the floorspace. A vertical furnace could potentially be converted to a salt pot at a later date.

I recall seeing a posting of a horizontal forge on a stand that could swivel upright to conserve floorspace during storage. It would not be too difficult to make such a forge that could operate in either a horizontal or vertical position. Another person told of someone mounting their furnace at an angle, like a mortar canon. A forge on a swivel could have settings between horizontal and vertical. A person could then use the furnace in whichever position worked best for the task at hand.

Just some food for thought.

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#9 EdgarFigaro

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 05:28 PM

"speaking of which, she has disappeared huh? haven't seen her post in about 3 months o.O
guess the zombies got her.. "

She'd been finishing up her test blades and was testing at Blade this weekend, so I'm eager to hear if she passed. I'm betting she did =P
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#10 Dave Stephens

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 06:01 PM

I too want something more reliable for heat treating swords than my current method of suspending my forge vertically and standing on a ladder, passing the blade through it.

I'm probably going to by one of these: http://www.evenheat-...s/kf40/kf40.htm

The longest model accomodates up to 49.5" blades.

They aren't cheap, but it sure would be nice to have the precision.

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#11 Scott Mack

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 06:58 PM

I too want something more reliable for heat treating swords than my current method of suspending my forge vertically and standing on a ladder, passing the blade through it.

I'm probably going to by one of these: http://www.evenheat-...s/kf40/kf40.htm

The longest model accomodates up to 49.5" blades.

They aren't cheap, but it sure would be nice to have the precision.

--Dave

Dave i have there 24" standered model, i am very pleased with it. i suggest that you go with the Rampmaster controller, wish i did! Scott
Quemadmoeum gladuis neminem occidit, occidentis telum est. (a sword is never a killer, it is a tool in the killer's hands.) Lucius Annaeus Seneca

#12 Bill Hoffman

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 08:16 PM

Just got back from Blade. There was some scuttlebut about a lady smith from down under
who had all her blades stolen by airport security. :angry: I hope the rumor is false, but especially so for Dee.

That's just really low for someone to do that.

Bill

#13 EdgarFigaro

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Posted 07 June 2010 - 12:13 AM

=[ I hope it's not true as well.
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#14 Bryan Bondurant

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 12:31 AM

Dee passed her Journeyman, she posted on Facebook that she was home and having computer problems, said she had a long story but it sounded like everything worked out. I'm sure she will update as soon as she gets her computer fixed.

#15 Kenon Rain

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 12:39 AM

that's real cool :)
Blam!

#16 EdgarFigaro

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 02:17 AM

Yup it is.
Curious to hear her story.
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#17 Brian Madigan

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 04:58 PM

Jesus Hernandez plans for the water tank HT forge are excellent. Cutting a water tank is kind of a PITA, although not dangerous like cutting a propane tank..
I've managed to get by with a 55 gallon oil drum, which is much lighter and easier to cut. It doesn't have the benefit of the built in tube for protecting the blade from the furnace environment, but an iron pipe can be inserted into the drum if desired.
I just cut the top off, cleaned the motor oil residue out (well burned it out), lined with 1" wool and used some stainless wire to keep the wool from moving around.
It has a 2" hole at the bottom where the burner flare fires in. I run it on 1 20lb tank at around 3psi max, manually adjusted.




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