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Kiridashi Utility


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#1 slab698

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 08:29 PM

Forged from 5160, It has a flat grind with convex edge. Overall length is 5&3/8ths overall with a 1&7/8ths cutting edge. Comes with the black paracord lanyard as seen in the photo. Price on this one is 65$ shipped anywhere in the lower 48. Thanks for lookin, Steve.

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#2 kyle o'donnell

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 12:11 AM

might i ask why this is so expensive? i dont mean to be a dick. i was just wondering if theres something special about it that i dont see.
there is a fine line between creation and destruction

#3 slab698

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 12:42 PM

Well I spent alot of time on it and think it's a fair price. Just my humble opinion of course.

Edited by slab698, 12 May 2011 - 12:43 PM.


#4 kyle o'donnell

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 02:41 PM

right on. how long did it take you? also how thick is it?
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#5 EdgarFigaro

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 03:27 PM

Seems like a good price to me for something hand made. =]
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#6 Todd Gdula

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 04:38 PM

Seems like a good price to me for something hand made. =]


Ditto.
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#7 TMason

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 04:43 PM

What would be the normal usage for a knife of this style?
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#8 slab698

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 04:57 PM

Tim just a neck knife or an everyday carry type of style. Kyle its .25in. thick tapering to the cutting edge, and I guess im not as fast as others at the anvil or grinder just yet. Thanks guys for the kind words.

Steve

#9 dragoncutlery

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Posted 12 May 2011 - 10:46 PM

that thing is huge you might need to come up with your own name for it when i think kiridashi i think small knife used for utility work and mostly making fine marks in wood for (like a pencil would be used for) fine wood working

im thinking post apocalyptic pencil tuner

or fighting spatula of doom (gotta have tha doom part)
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#10 kyle o'donnell

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Posted 13 May 2011 - 12:30 AM

that thing is huge you might need to come up with your own name for it when i think kiridashi i think small knife used for utility work and mostly making fine marks in wood for (like a pencil would be used for) fine wood working

im thinking post apocalyptic pencil tuner

or fighting spatula of doom (gotta have tha doom part)

yeh. i was kinda thinking the same. its closer looking to a chisel than a kiridashi
there is a fine line between creation and destruction

#11 slab698

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Posted 13 May 2011 - 11:40 AM

I honestly wasn't too sure on what to call it since it is a little bit bigger than most ive seen. Fighting spatula of doom is great :lol: .

#12 TMason

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Posted 13 May 2011 - 04:31 PM

I love the style and look of it, should be a handy piece.
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#13 Bret

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 01:10 AM

might i ask why this is so expensive? i dont mean to be a dick. i was just wondering if theres something special about it that i dont see.



yeh. i was kinda thinking the same. its closer looking to a chisel than a kiridashi


WOW Kyle, I dont mean to be offensive or anything but, man your just being offensive. Constructive criticism is one thing but, Im thinking this is borderline insulting. Just saying. My opinion. There are many people here far far better than me that could poor derision on my work and I am grateful that instead the are helpful understanding and informative. Thats why Im here. probably why your here. and in that spirit I think you would be better served following that example. You tend to get out of people what you put in.

Slab very cool man

Edited by Bret, 17 May 2011 - 01:12 AM.


#14 kyle o'donnell

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 02:01 AM

im sorry if i was offensive. but i simply said what i wanted to know. and my interpretations.
belive me. i can make an offensive comment. these were not them.
if you look up kiridashi. they tend to have more of a knifelike look with a chisel grind.
there is a fine line between creation and destruction

#15 Mathew Kinmond

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 07:12 AM

uh....kiridashi's are chisel grind for the reason of dexterity with wood working and ease to re-sharpen. back in the older days it was too hard to make sure you were centered with the two angles. and grinders and even sharpening stones were expensive. so most people asked for this style. you might want to try looking up the history before you (pardon the ironic pun) hack and slash at someones work. trust me i've tried this and i didn't do as well.

very nice knife man. love the grind lines, it adds a bit of flavor.

Edited by Mathew Kinmond, 17 May 2011 - 07:13 AM.


#16 Bryan Bondurant

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 10:55 AM

Design for purpose. If you made the knife this style for use as a specific tool, good deal. If you just tried to remove as little material as possible so you could call it a knife, its lazy work.


The actual blade shape has many obvious functions as a scraper. Anyone working on cabinets, furniture, longbows are scraping large hides would be happy to have a big flat wide blade like this. Having said that the handle does not present itself as something that would be comfortable to use for hour after hour. I can feel the blisters popping up on my hands just looking at the tool thinking of uses for it.


The bottom line is with any completed blade you will learn something you can change, keep, or add to a future knife as long as you keep a positive attitude.

#17 Bryan Bondurant

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 11:01 AM

Design for purpose. If you made the knife this style for use as a specific tool, good deal. If you just tried to remove as little material as possible so you could call it a knife, its lazy work.


The actual blade shape has many obvious functions as a scraper. Anyone working on cabinets, furniture, longbows are scraping large hides would be happy to have a big flat wide blade like this. Having said that the handle does not present itself as something that would be comfortable to use for hour after hour. I can feel the blisters popping up on my hands just looking at the tool thinking of uses for it.


The bottom line is with any completed blade you will learn something you can change, keep, or add to a future knife as long as you keep a positive attitude.

#18 slab698

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 11:56 AM

I have alot to learn and will raise both hands in saying Im no pro in the knife making world just yet. :lol: Im glad to have found a forum like this where people are willing to share their knowledge for free, Doesn't get much better than that for me.

Steve

#19 kyle o'donnell

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 12:15 PM

steve, i really didnt mean to offend you and im sorry if i did.
mathew, i was talking about the fact that most kiridashi have a point.
there is a fine line between creation and destruction

#20 slab698

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Posted 17 May 2011 - 07:28 PM

No worries at all kyle.




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