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Peter Johnsson - The making of a Messer sword


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#1 Thomas Reitmeier

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 06:52 PM

I wonder, why nobody has posted this:





If I had overlook the post,Sorry.

#2 Alan Longmire

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 09:36 AM

I love it! A friend sent me those links yesterday and I watched them this morning. Peter is fun to watch, especially for me as his style of working is almost exactly the way I approach fit-up and filework. He's just a WHOLE lot better at it. :lol:

#3 Dave Stephens

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 10:37 AM

I'm wondering about the ring on the hilt. He's taking it to a very high degree of finish before it is (welded? soldered? brazed?) to the crossguard. I would have thought one would do so at an early stage, to avoid your cleanup of the joints marring your finish work.

Peter, I wonder if you might share how you permanently affix the ring element?

Thanks,

Dave

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#4 Jim Kelso

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 10:48 AM

A pleasure to watch such skill in action.

Jim

#5 peter johnsson

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 10:51 AM

Hi Guys!

I prefer to use an oxy-acetylen welding torch when building complex hilts. How far to bring file work before welding is always a balance. I find that some details are easier to do when parts are still unattached. With the gas welder it is possible to have pretty local heats so that scaling is limited to the area closest to the weld.

Before dong the final weld I file V-groves around the edges that are to be melted together by the torch. I strive to fill the gap from the bottom up to make sure I get a good fill and avoid pores. I hate those pores. After the actual welding, I brush the flame over the weld several times to heat cycle it. Hilt furniture is normally made from 1050 so grain growth and hardening is an issue to take into account. If all goes as planned, the weld is both strong and invisible.

I have a love-hate relationship with complex hilts...
;)

#6 Dave Stephens

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 02:02 PM

Thank you, Peter.

Do you use any filler rod when you join the elements of the hilt, or simply melt the pieces together?

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com


#7 peter johnsson

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 03:20 PM

Dave, I use a regular filler rod, but also work with the material itself.

#8 Sam Salvati

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 03:34 PM

Awesome Peter, cool to see you work!
Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

#9 Al Massey

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 06:04 PM

Peter, I recall during a blacksmithing conference in Nova Scotia after some home-made mead myself and a fellow smith speculated that some basket- hilts might have had some pieces "squeeze-welded" together with tongs or such after being brought to a welding heat rather than welded on a stake or anvil. I've welded soft iron wire rings together in this way to make closed links for a maille project, and I imagine much larger bars of a typical basket-hilt would hold the heat at least as well. This would minimise distortion, imho, and with different shaped jaws on the tongs would allow you to get into tight spaces that would be a pain to hammer shut.
Just a thought.




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