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Epoxy for Paracord Wraps


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#1 Dan Scott

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 11:50 AM

So I've done probably 4 or 5 handles in the past 2 weeks with paracord and epoxy to seal it. This is pretty usual ground for me, so that fact that I'm having problems is really starting to piss me off :angry: . I recently switched to a new epoxy (loctite 60 min. professional 2-part epoxy), and I've finally figured out this morning that it does not properly withstand the temperature kydex gets to when it is heated for sheath forming, an absolutely necessary requirement for most of my handles. I also learned that, even when fully dried, the stuff is not water resistant. It gets very tacky and sticky when wet for any significant amount of time (found this out while skinning a squirrel, not pleasant at all, think squirrel hair glued to everything :blink: ).

Anyway, I'm pretty frustrated with this since I'll have to redo all those handles. Before I do that, though, I want to ask, what epoxy (brand, set time) do other people use to seal their handles? I don't have the bottle of what I used to use (haven't done an epoxy seal in about a year before these ones), so I can't remember what brand it was, and I don't want to go through this hassle/waste of money again.

Basically, I need an epoxy that will dry rock solid into paracord, won't melt when exposed to soft kydex, and won't dissolve in water. I know there's one out there, because I've used it a lot, I just can't remember for the life of me what it was.

Thanks a lot for the help!

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#2 Stephen Stumbo

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 02:36 PM

I use fiberglass resin on mine, and the first one I made like that I carried all day every day for several months and never had a problem with it.

ymmv though.


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#3 dragoncutlery

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 05:33 PM

west system g flex is what im using comes in bottles im getting it from west marine in town but im sure its available online best part is it doesn't get as brital as most epoxy's so i believe that will help in the long run and it has at least a one hour set time or better cant remember right now
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#4 dragoncutlery

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 05:34 PM

have formed kydex over it and its sold for doing boat repairs so im guessing water tight :)
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#5 Orien M

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 11:56 AM

I use shellac (Rockler brand flake) on my wrapped handles, as it's a little more flexible than the epoxies I've tried, and still quite tough. I have no idea if it "likes" kydex, though.
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#6 Eric Leonard

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 11:56 PM

i would try gorilla epoxy
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#7 Brian Vanspeybroeck

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 08:10 AM

Having tried lots of different things like epoxy on my handles and ended up sticking with super thin CA (super glue) as my final solution. Try it but remember to use the super thin stuff as it is thinner than water and soaks in instantly and is invisible.

It will degrade in the presence of strong solvents like acetone but it works very, very well with paracord and water/blood etc.

Used properly it is invisible and the wrap maintains a very natural look - it doesn't get glossy or "wet" looking. This is CA potted paracord with the guts pulled out of the cord to make a flat nylon tape. It looks very natural but it is tough as nails.

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You might get frosting (A white frost like substance) if you aplly it in high humidity so experiment a bit before using it on an expensive piece that has to go out the door in 3 hours. There is a learning curve to using CA for potting paracord handles but it is worth the effort.

Good luck!

Brian

Edited by Brian Vanspeybroeck, 04 May 2012 - 08:13 AM.

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#8 Stephen Stumbo

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 04:33 PM

Hey brian, do you use the brush on type, or the tube type?

Thanks, Stephen.


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#9 James Weaver

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 11:23 PM

I have good luck using the minwax wood hardener its like thin superglue.

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#10 Brian Vanspeybroeck

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 06:46 PM

Hey brian, do you use the brush on type, or the tube type?


Always the dropper tube. Not that any other type is "bad" just that I started using this stuff many years ago, found what works for me, and never experimented after that. I have been inactive as a crafter for some time and unable to connect with my artist inside but that seems to be falling aside and ideas are again flowing. I use the super thin CA glue and after a bit of experimentation in application I find that the effect rivals anything else I have ever used.

I'm fondling a tanto made in 2007 potted with super thin CA on the paracord at this minute. It's as good as I left it 5 years ago - tight and beautiful and weatherproof. B)

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I have several swords and such done over tha last 15 years or so that use various things. The CA potted ones have held up the best and are functional, durable, beautiful and really appeal. So, as I contemplate re entering the crafting of Japanese style cutlery I have settled on using super thin CA as my potting solution of choice.

It works for me. :)

Brian

Edited by Brian Vanspeybroeck, 02 June 2012 - 06:49 PM.

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