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Why do blacksmiths use a post vice rather than a conventional vise?


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#1 Brandon Buford

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 01:36 PM

What is the reason blacksmiths use a post vice rather than a conventional vice? I am sure that there is a reason, I just can't figure it out.

I have several conventional vices that I could mount on any kind of stand. What would I gain from a post vice?

#2 jake cleland

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 01:40 PM

conventional vises really don't stand up to heavy forging operations - they're not designed for the hammering and bending forces that post vises are regularly subjected to, plus the jaws tend to be hardened and can crack from a stray hammer blow.
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#3 Brandon Buford

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 01:44 PM

Okay, thanks. Does the stand up nature of the post vice lend itself to being stronger in the twisting?

#4 Greg Thomas Obach

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 01:53 PM

yes

leg vise is bolted to the table or post... twistin is no prob
leg vise are almost alway made of wrought iron or mild iron ...

so far conventional vises that i've run up on are mostly cast iron ... good for boat anchors or use for hand filing blades

just look at the size of the acme screw on a 4 inch leg and compare it to a conv vise... tells alot

G

#5 pieter-pauld

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 02:18 PM

also a post vice is in direct contact with te ground, making it behave a bit like an anvil and giving it a bit of rebound.
this is what i learnt anyway.
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#6 Alan Longmire

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 03:02 PM

On top of all the above, a post vise is designed so the screw is free-floating in the frame, and thus takes no shear forces when hammered on. A regular bench vise is held together entirely by the screw, which takes all the load no matter what.

#7 Brandon Buford

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Posted 01 August 2012 - 03:32 PM

See, I knew that all you experts would have the answer!




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