Jump to content


Photo

Hand forging a little dagger


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 Raymond Richard

Raymond Richard
  • Members
  • 2,122 posts
  • Location:Gresham, Or.

Posted 07 January 2013 - 04:41 PM

Anymore me doing a little thing turns out to be a bigger job than I planned but since that is now the way things are I'll just go along with it.

The first photo is the preform I forged to shape the day before I started this project.
Posted Image

This photo was taken after I forged the bevel on 1/2 of the blade.
Posted Image

In this photo I forged the second bevel.
Posted Image

This photo was taken after I spent more time forging on both bevels. Most of the hammering was done with the cross peen on a 3 pound hammer and was later cleaned up with the flat face of a 16 ounce ball peen hammer.
Posted Image

The last photo is looking down on one of the beveled edges.
Posted Image
Raymond Richard
www.hawknknives.com

#2 Troy Christianson

Troy Christianson
  • Members
  • 876 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Faribault MN
  • Interests:Knifemaking, Blackpowder shooting, BBQ-ing, pottery, outdoor activity, hunting, camping,

Posted 07 January 2013 - 06:17 PM

Masterful work.

Edited by Troy Christianson, 07 January 2013 - 06:26 PM.

Troy Allen Christianson is NOT a "Licensed Bladesmith" so you may treat his posts with the contempt they deserve.

#3 Wade Hougham

Wade Hougham
  • Supporting Member
  • 1,336 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Florida

Posted 07 January 2013 - 07:13 PM

Ray,
You DO have a way with steel. Nice start and thanks for sharing.
Wade
Wade
Jos et löydä rauhaa itsestämme on turhaa etsiä sitä muualta.
If you can not find peace within yourself, it is useless to look elsewhere.
Visit my website http://www.wadesknives.com

#4 Rob Toneguzzo

Rob Toneguzzo
  • Members
  • 1,268 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Northern Territory Australia
  • Interests:Bladesmithing, Bowhunting, Boxing, Fishing, Art

Posted 08 January 2013 - 04:48 AM

Very interested in seeing this one unfold. Great stuff!
"Old dogs care about you even when you make mistakes" - Tom HALL - Old Dogs, Children and Watermelon Wine.

#5 Kevin (The Professor)

Kevin (The Professor)
  • Supporting Member
  • 3,277 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cheshire, CT
  • Interests:reading, Psychology, law, public policy (teaching people to get along, take care of one-another, and not destroy the planet in the process). Bladesmithing, Outdoors stuff of all types, esp. camping and ecology, exercise, cooking. Dogs and Cats.

Posted 08 January 2013 - 04:50 AM

thanks Ray. I have never really used the cross peen to forge bevels in. I have always just tilted the work and used half-face blows, and then worked the bevels up from there. I think Tim Lively's vid may still be the best visual reference for the technique I try to use.

I have seen a lot of people, in person and on vid and in pics, do the drawing down of bevels with the cross peen. Never seen anyone do it with a dagger or double-edged blade before. You did a great job, it appears.

So, after all of that, the question: do you tilt the blade a bit when using the cross peen the same way you would tilt it when using the hammer face to forge in bevels, or does it not matter with the peen?

thanks,
kc

please visit my website: www.professorsforge.com

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs


#6 Raymond Richard

Raymond Richard
  • Members
  • 2,122 posts
  • Location:Gresham, Or.

Posted 08 January 2013 - 02:28 PM

thanks Ray. I have never really used the cross peen to forge bevels in. I have always just tilted the work and used half-face blows, and then worked the bevels up from there. I think Tim Lively's vid may still be the best visual reference for the technique I try to use.

I have seen a lot of people, in person and on vid and in pics, do the drawing down of bevels with the cross peen. Never seen anyone do it with a dagger or double-edged blade before. You did a great job, it appears.

So, after all of that, the question: do you tilt the blade a bit when using the cross peen the same way you would tilt it when using the hammer face to forge in bevels, or does it not matter with the peen?

thanks,
kc



Kevin, As far as tilting the blade while forging I think I have tried it from time to time but I just don't think it makes any difference. As usual I probably approach hand forging all wrong. Pretty sure I leave the blade flat except when it comes time to straighten things at the end of the forging.

Here's a few more photo's of this knife. Used my old standby Godzilla while working on the rear end. The last photo in this group is pretty much how the knife looks right now.


Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Raymond Richard
www.hawknknives.com

#7 Josh McCall

Josh McCall
  • Members
  • 17 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Greer, SC
  • Interests:Hunting, Fishing, Learning Everything.

Posted 08 January 2013 - 10:31 PM

Oh man I love this. Awesome work.

#8 John F. Ellis

John F. Ellis
  • Members
  • 586 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eastern Ohio
  • Interests:Metalworking, woodworking, parkour, survival skills, etc.

Posted 09 January 2013 - 11:01 AM

Love the curl on the end!

My website-

Dunstan Forge


#9 Doug Lester

Doug Lester
  • Members
  • 3,066 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Decatur, IL
  • Interests:knives, swords, history

Posted 09 January 2013 - 11:21 AM

Great work. Gives me some ideas to try on my next attempt to do a double edged dagger. To all those out there who think this is an easy pattern, and it may be after you figure out how to do it, try it sometime. There are a lot of elements to it that can get away from you. It will be nice to see that one finished.

Doug
HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

#10 Raymond Richard

Raymond Richard
  • Members
  • 2,122 posts
  • Location:Gresham, Or.

Posted 09 January 2013 - 02:01 PM

Here's an old photo I took in October of 09. At the time I was into making socketed spearheads. I wanted to show the many shapes the spearhead became while I was hand forging it. There was probably 10 to 20 minutes between each time I traced the work on the big sliding door of my shop. Forging the blade of the spearhead is exactly the same as forging a dagger.

If you look at 10 I had just forged the bevel on the one side. 11 I had forged the second bevel which had straightened the blade out.

Posted Image

Edited by Raymond Richard, 10 January 2013 - 01:22 PM.

Raymond Richard
www.hawknknives.com

#11 Troy Christianson

Troy Christianson
  • Members
  • 876 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Faribault MN
  • Interests:Knifemaking, Blackpowder shooting, BBQ-ing, pottery, outdoor activity, hunting, camping,

Posted 09 January 2013 - 08:08 PM

Clever! Ever so descriptive.
Troy Allen Christianson is NOT a "Licensed Bladesmith" so you may treat his posts with the contempt they deserve.

#12 Rob Toneguzzo

Rob Toneguzzo
  • Members
  • 1,268 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Northern Territory Australia
  • Interests:Bladesmithing, Bowhunting, Boxing, Fishing, Art

Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:08 AM

Love the note to self on 4.
"Old dogs care about you even when you make mistakes" - Tom HALL - Old Dogs, Children and Watermelon Wine.

#13 vihalvor

vihalvor
  • Members
  • 152 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 11 January 2013 - 03:05 PM

Dude .. that shape-sequence on the socketed spearhear is spot on what i have been looking for ..
*yoink* - copied !! :P

thanks friend :)

-vidar-

#14 Raymond Richard

Raymond Richard
  • Members
  • 2,122 posts
  • Location:Gresham, Or.

Posted 07 February 2013 - 04:33 PM

I finally got around to finishing off the little dagger. Instead of using wood for scales I used a couple pieces of 1/4" thick sole leather. Not sure if it was processed differently than the normal leather. Its stiff and quite hard. One of the reason I didn't want to go with wood was the handle area was not perfectly flat and I did not want to try and grind it. After I Barge cemented both the knife and the leather I put it in my vise to put pressure on it. It made a real tight seal and then I used some iron telegraph wire WG had given me to make rivets out of. Pretty pleased with how it turned out. Also added a few photo's of the sheath making precess I use. The finally pictures of the sheath was taken after I applied the leather dye. The knife was forged out of 1084. The blade is 4 1/2" and 9 1/2" overall. Guess it isn't all that small.






Raymond Richard
www.hawknknives.com

#15 Cody James

Cody James
  • Members
  • 64 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brimfield Ohio
  • Interests:Knives, Blacksmithing, Photography, Digital Art.

Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:32 PM

Very nice! like the sheath to.
VIKINGS Just pile your gold up in the front door, set your house on fire, die now and save yourself the trouble.

My Blog and DeviantArt profile

#16 Justin Chenault

Justin Chenault
  • Members
  • 151 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Richwood Ohio

Posted 07 February 2013 - 08:05 PM

Great hammer control and a very well executed knife I really like the shape.



#17 Kevin (The Professor)

Kevin (The Professor)
  • Supporting Member
  • 3,277 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cheshire, CT
  • Interests:reading, Psychology, law, public policy (teaching people to get along, take care of one-another, and not destroy the planet in the process). Bladesmithing, Outdoors stuff of all types, esp. camping and ecology, exercise, cooking. Dogs and Cats.

Posted 07 February 2013 - 09:52 PM

thanks for sharing this Ray. I like the leather idea to avoid grinding.

 

I have found that, in small areas at least, you can use cold blue and some texturing to get the forged look back if you need to file something to fix it and want the, "as forged" look. cool sequence of drawings, too.


please visit my website: www.professorsforge.com

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs


#18 Kip Kaiser

Kip Kaiser
  • Members
  • 1,292 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Williamston, SC
  • Interests:Knife making
    Learning blacksmithing
    Hot glass
    Woodworking
    Camping
    Fishing
    Hunting
    and being in the mountains
    with my Wife and Kids

Posted 07 February 2013 - 10:14 PM

Raymond

 

Awesome post very helpful and inspirational, thanks so much!!!

 

Kip 


A man is no better than his word! Check out the web site @ www.thekaisercustomknives.com


#19 Raymond Richard

Raymond Richard
  • Members
  • 2,122 posts
  • Location:Gresham, Or.

Posted 08 February 2013 - 12:29 AM

thanks for sharing this Ray. I like the leather idea to avoid grinding.

 

I have found that, in small areas at least, you can use cold blue and some texturing to get the forged look back if you need to file something to fix it and want the, "as forged" look. cool sequence of drawings, too.

Kevin, That's a trick I have known for years. Cold Blue is our friend.


Raymond Richard
www.hawknknives.com

#20 Rob Toneguzzo

Rob Toneguzzo
  • Members
  • 1,268 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Northern Territory Australia
  • Interests:Bladesmithing, Bowhunting, Boxing, Fishing, Art

Posted 09 February 2013 - 05:19 AM

I've been waiting to see this...very nice forging...turned out great
"Old dogs care about you even when you make mistakes" - Tom HALL - Old Dogs, Children and Watermelon Wine.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users