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Swedish powder steel


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#1 DannyB

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Posted 13 March 2005 - 10:17 PM

Hi everyone
Could somebody help me?? I need info on swedish powder steel. I would like to know if it's good steel. Is it a good choice for a sword? everything you have.
Thanks

#2 Ken Burns

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 08:14 AM

dannyb -- my 'cutting' sword was made in Japan supposedly with Swedish powder steel. The only fault I find in it - at least in my opinion is the heat treat was slightly off ( mune is too soft). Or maybe that is the way it was meant to be. The hasaki is very hard - holds an edge very well. Cuts very nicely when I do my part.

ksb

#3 DGentile

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Posted 14 March 2005 - 09:57 AM

Swedish Powder Steel??

I know that there are many types of Powder Metallurgical "Swedish" steels...
so before I could help you I'd need at least a correct description/name/number...


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#4 DannyB

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Posted 19 March 2005 - 09:44 PM

Swedish Powder Steel??

I know that there are many types of Powder Metallurgical "Swedish" steels...
so before I could help you I'd need at least a correct description/name/number...
dan

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Sorry but that's all I have. That's the kind of info a receive from a guy who was said by another guy that swedish powder steel was good" If you know what I mean??
Thanks anyway..
Danny

#5 DGentile

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Posted 20 March 2005 - 04:52 AM

Then I'm sorry, but I can't help you...
for the simple reason that I can not give you an answer about "Swedish Powder Steel" which would fit on all Swedish Powder Steels....

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#6 Giuseppe Maresca

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Posted 23 March 2005 - 04:57 AM

Maybe you refer to ASSAB K-120C powdered Swedish steel, used to make Paul Chen katanas?
Mourir pour des ides, c'est bien beau mais lesquelles?

#7 mete

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Posted 23 March 2005 - 09:09 AM

'swedish powder steel' like Crucibles CPM steels denotes a way of making steel not the alloy. So unless further defined it can be any alloy.

Maybe you refer to ASSAB K-120C powdered Swedish steel, used to make Paul Chen katanas?

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#8 jonas.j.holmberg

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 10:07 AM

It might be the Damasteel produtline you are thinking of.

Jonas.

#9 Kevin H

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 12:39 PM

Actually, saying Swedish powder steel doesn't even specify the production method. Hoganas AB, headquartered in Hoganas, Sweden, the world's predominant producer of iron based powders produces iron/steel powders by at least 3 different methods - direct solid state reduction of iron ore, water atomizing molten steel melted in an EAF, and gas atomizing I believe from an induction furnace.

#10 DannyB

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Posted 02 April 2005 - 06:16 PM

Thanks guys
That what I taught.....that's not a new magic steel. Is it 5160 best steel to do a sword. We want to do tameshigiri with it.

#11 DGentile

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Posted 03 April 2005 - 03:13 AM

Thanks guys
    That what I taught.....that's not a new magic steel.  Is it 5160 best steel to do a sword.  We want to do tameshigiri with it.

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For a Katana type sword I would not go by 5160...
5160 can work of course... but if you plan on going the "hamon-way" 5160 tends to be not so responsvie...

Best would be (if you don't want to fold things) something from the 1060, 1070, 1075, 1085, 1090 or a W1 or W1...

basically try to stick to any "plain" carbon steel with 0.6 (0.5 works too but I don't like it that much) to 1.0 %Carbon...
Water hardening steels and either use polymers or heated brine (salted water) ...
this delivers nice results.
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#12 DannyB

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Posted 22 April 2005 - 09:44 PM

Thank you Daniel
I was thinking of trying the 10... category after I watched Wally Hayes tape ''How to do Katana tac''
Thanks for your time and knowledge

Danny




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