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Peter Wright Anvil


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#1 Kristopher Skelton

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Posted 28 April 2005 - 12:15 PM

I found a local guy who has a peter wright for sale, says it's 150# and in good shape. he's asking $450

That sounds like a good price, but is it?

What should I look for/be wary of? I'm bringing a sraight edge to make sure the face isn't bowed. And I'll bring a small hammer to check the ring (after I ask, of course :) ) Are small surface pits a deal breaker? What about cracked edges?

Or is this a case of "if you can live with it, then live with it"

thanks (and no, I won't tell you where he lives until after I've seen the anvil :lol: )
Kristopher Skelton, M.A.

"There was never a good knife made from bad steel"
A quiet person will perish ~ Basotho Proverb


#2 Michael Stuart

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Posted 02 May 2005 - 12:49 PM

Hey engineerboy,
I've got one I'm fairly certain is a PW but the logo isn't visible (but the hundredweight marks are). It's not like-new (there is a bit of sway etc) but it's marked equal to 171 pounds and I'm trying to sell it for $325*. So if yours is mint then 450 is a good deal, but otherwise it may be a bit high.

Deep cracks would be bad, small ones can be ground out or worked around. Pits can be sanded/ground out if there's enough of the face left when you're done. Most anvils that age will have a few pits and some sway, and often one edge rolled over a bit from use. If the ring and rebound are good, you should be fine. If there's no ring or a bad sound (buzz or clunk) the face plate may be delaminating, and you should run away. If no rebound or soft face, it may have been in a fire.

*sales pitch: If anyone reading is in NC and is interested in the anvil I mentioned above, email me at michaelstuart at g mail dot com (remove spaces etc) and I can send a photo of said anvil. I'm also selling a big Champion hand crank blower and a bellows. I have to move to FL later this summer, and I have two other anvils I'm keeping.

Michael

#3 Kristopher Skelton

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Posted 02 May 2005 - 01:17 PM

Thanks... I actually picked it up yesterday.
Face was nearly flawless- only 3 hammer marks that I could see, and none of them could be felt or picked at with a fingernail.... superficial is the word I'd use. No pitting! The face was flat against the edge of a steel rule. the rule was placed at 3 different spots, and there was no light shining through, and no bumps to make it wobble. A few small flakes have been taken off the "far" side (if the horn points left) and the hardie has a little bit of chipping around the top. It was obvioulsy used as the cutting plate has lots of chisel marks, and so does the horn. I'm not worried about either since I don't use the horn a lot to strike on; I don't think I'll be picking up and noticeable dents on my bent piece. I also use a cutting plate ove the face when I'm chiseling.

It clearly reads "Peter Wright" on the side and 1-1-16 for the weight. the surface rust was very slight, and I suspect this was kept in a barn or some such that didn't let it take too much exposure. It took about 20 minutes with a 120 grit flap disk and then some 100 grit hand sanding to get a recognizable reflection in the face. There is no seperation of the face from the body- and the weld line isn't even visible.

rebound is superb and the ring is beautiful... I must confess I was a little worried before I saw it. But close inspection and the first hammer blow told me I had a winner. The gent I bought it from is a fellow NorthWest Blacksmith Assn member and knew the answers to the questions that I'd emailed him, so I wasn't really concerned that I'd be driving to look at a piece of yard art.

Overall I'm very happy with the purchase, and managed to use it for about a half hour yesterday- making the 5/8" round staples that hold it to the stump and making a sample fire poker :D A very enjoyable experience- my previous anvil was a 110# "Harbor Freight Russian". I've sprayed the heck out of the Peter Wright with WD40 in an effort to keep the little bit of rust on the feet from getting worse, and to prevent rust in general.
if I can manage some decent pics of the side with the "writing" on it, I'll post those, and other pics, too.... but if the pics suck I won't waste anyone's time with them
Kristopher Skelton, M.A.

"There was never a good knife made from bad steel"
A quiet person will perish ~ Basotho Proverb


#4 Protactical

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Posted 28 August 2005 - 01:03 AM

I got one free from a pal, who was interested in wraught work for a while, but gave up on it. Mine is a little dinged, but it rings and rebounds really well. I didn't realize it was anything special until some guy used one on the Woodwright shop.

#5 csc

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Posted 28 August 2005 - 11:00 AM

$450 for a 150 lb is probly the going rate in certain parts of the country, you might be able to find them cheaper somewhere else but by the time ya ship them or drive somewhere at $2.70 a gallond in gas the price evens out. surface dings aren't a problem as you can weld them up and actually I like a little bow in the face of my anvil. I got a 163lb pw for free and then I paid $200 for Ken makel to true it up and reharden it and surface grind it.
there are lots of anvil collectors out there and they make the prices go up.

congradulations on your buy
chad
abs journeyman
www.carrollknives.com

#6 Kristopher Skelton

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Posted 28 August 2005 - 02:04 PM

Thanks Chad. Yes, I considered that the anvil needed very little dressing to be completely useable, and that shipping for a new one was going be about half as much as I paid for this one and for me to pick it up only took about 2 hours round trip back in May. I'm thoroughly enjoying it and when I make the new base, it'll be even better (wood box filled with cement, basically)

Anvil collectors are really starting to irritate me. A railing fabricator whom I met with to discuss working with him had over 48 anvils ranging in weight from 50-450# and didn't use a single one of them!! He'd never even heated metal and hit it with a hammer. They were just sitting off to the side in his shop stacked on top of each other. Any wonder it's so hard to find a decent anvil anymore?

Anyway...... :)
Kristopher Skelton, M.A.

"There was never a good knife made from bad steel"
A quiet person will perish ~ Basotho Proverb


#7 BSchermann

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Posted 30 August 2005 - 02:16 PM

I had a Peter Wright anvil given to me. I'm pretty new to anvils and was wondering how do you use the numbers on the side to figure the weight?

Mine is stamped 1.2.20

Thanks,
Brent

#8 Alan Longmire

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Posted 30 August 2005 - 02:35 PM

On English anvils like Peter Wright, Mousehole, and so on, the weight markings are in the old hundredweight system. The first number is whole hundredweight, or 112 lb increments, the second is quarter-hundredweights, or 28-lb increments, and the last number is straight pounds. So, for one marked 1 2 20, that means 112 + (2*28) + 20, for a grand total of 188 lbs. That's when new, they tend to lose weight from rust and abuse over the years. My PW is marked 1 1 3, or 143 lbs. Actual weight on a bathroom scale seems to be 141.5!

American anvils like Hay-Budden and Trenton are marked in pounds. Fishers are marked in tenths, i.e. a Fisher #20 weighs 200 lbs.

#9 BSchermann

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 01:02 AM

Thanks Alan, 188lbs......The Farrier that gave it to me said it was only about 150, guess he doesn't know how to read the markings. I almost gave myself a hernia moving it last weekend :P

#10 henl

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 08:52 PM

I found a local guy who has a peter wright for sale, says it's 150# and in good shape. he's asking $450

That sounds like a good price, but is it?

What should I look for/be wary of? I'm bringing a sraight edge to make sure the face isn't bowed. And I'll bring a small hammer to check the ring (after I ask, of course :) ) Are small surface pits a deal breaker? What about cracked edges?

Or is this a case of "if you can live with it, then live with it"

thanks (and no, I won't tell you where he lives until after I've seen the anvil :lol: )



#11 henl

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 08:54 PM

I just bought a PW from a guy in Vt. $300. it is marked 1-2-10 so I guess it is 188 lbs (feels all of that) the number 3 is in the "wrought" circle, came from a blacksmith shop beside Eli Whitneys wotkshop in Londonderry Vt.. It is in great shape. I'm not sure how to tell it's age or worth, but am happy with the buy from what I've seen written in these forums.
Any info someone can add about these would be welcome.




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