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those japanese style hammers


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#1 Tristan

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 05:02 PM

what do you think of them, and why? they look sorta odd

#2 Mike Blue

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 05:53 PM

Ya gotta use them to know. I've got five or six. Call Bill Fiorini or Nathan Robertson their addresses are in the archives here somewhere.
There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. Will Rogers

#3 Brian Vanspeybroeck

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 07:45 PM

I saw some of Bill Fiorini's hammers and had a chance to heft them a bit. I'm not a smith except for making a few fittings by forging but I have to tell you Bill's hammers are exciting and seem to be all hand crafted one of a kinds.

Get one, work with it is my advice. Next time I see one I'm buyin' it! :lol:

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#4 Protactical

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 08:53 PM

They are good, the smiths often make them themselves out of normal sledge type hammers, simply cutting the rear face off them.

The idea of having the weight shifted towards the face is found in a lot of hammers, claw hammers for instance. What makes the Japanese hammers look so cool is they really look weight forward. I have several, and I still think it's the workman not his tools. But as a tool maker, I sure like tools that have any little bit of an advantage to them.

I have about a dozen japanese hammers of various types, and they all seem to have welded construction, except the blacksmith hammers. Has anyone seen one with welded construction?

#5 Adlai Stein

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Posted 25 August 2005 - 10:44 AM

I bought a 3.5lb hand forged Japanese style hammer at Quad State last year. I haven't forged with anything else since. Because the head is longer than the peen it is very top heavy not the balanced type of hammer that we are used to working. It took me a little bit to get used to the feel. It moves metal like a dream and welds even better. I need a couple more Japanese style hammers in various weights.
Adlai
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#6 Christopher Makin

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Posted 25 August 2005 - 03:59 PM

I have two japanese style hammers one is one of Bill's that is about 2#that I use for getting out to the edge and tip work.The other was made by Frank Turley and is close to 4# that I use to move steel.The big one in addition to being weight forward is also slightly offset and kind of forces you to work inline a bit.

#7 Adlai Stein

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Posted 26 August 2005 - 06:17 AM

Here is my hammer.

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Edited by Macabee, 26 August 2005 - 06:21 AM.

Adlai
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#8 Mike Blue

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Posted 26 August 2005 - 07:24 AM

I'd bet that's Nathan Robertson's work. Good hammer, good smith, good friend. I've got several of his laying around.
There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. Will Rogers




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