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KA 75 power hammer


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#1 B Finnigan

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 01:21 AM

Has anyone ever used the KA 75 power hammer?
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#2 Bob Ouellette

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 02:00 AM

My school has one. It isn't so much a power hammer when you think of an air hammer, but more of an air opperated striker. Or so my teacher says, we're not allowed to used the fun stuff :P
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#3 R.H.Graham

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 08:29 AM

Get into practice with one and you can operate it like a powerhammer no problem. But yeah, they are a single-blow hammer, and they hit hard. IF you want to do a lot of punching and drifting, and die-work, they work really really well for that. And they don't take up very much room which is nice.
High-powered treadle-hammer is what it's like.

#4 Jared T.

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 10:23 AM

are they good for forge welding?

#5 R.H.Graham

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 11:06 AM

are they good for forge welding?


Yeah, they will work just fine for that. All kinds of little tricks you can do with them to make them work for specific things better. For example, it's a single stroke air hammer... to do the initial weld, you can slap in the flat dies, and turn the regulator on the air supply down a bit, or throw a block under the foot pedal, to give you a nice easy but solid blow to weld the billet, then when you put the steel back in the fire, you can turn it back up, or kick the block out from under the pedal to get full steam to draw out with.

With the KA hammers, you have a lot of controll with some practice... when you drop the pedal all the way you get full air and a hard stroke, but push the pedal partway and you cut back on the air and get a softer stroke. With practice you can get a rythm going and run the thing just like a slow air-hammer. I guy I know who has used them for years to make hammers with, and other stuff, strokes it about 2 strokes a second when he wants too and it's smooth and he has really nice controll over every blow.

It's essentially a treadle hammer run on air, and operates off the pedal the same way a treadle hammer does.
If I had the money, I'd actually have one myself, for punching and drifting especially it's the cats' ass.
But otherwise, anything you can do on a treadle hammer, you can do with a KA, faster.

It's pricey and you need a compressor.... if you do enough work with it it's a good investment though IMO, it can perform a lot of work in a given amount of time.

Edited by RHGraham, 17 February 2007 - 11:08 AM.


#6 Mike Blue

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 11:25 AM

I guy I know who has used them for years to make hammers with, and other stuff, strokes it about 2 strokes a second when he wants too and it's smooth and he has really nice controll over every blow.


You didn't tell about how Nathan has pretty much found, then surpassed, the upper limit of the KA's working range too, because he only knows how to run these hammers at 175 psi and no off button...if he'd only learn how to feather it a little the hammer would last way longer.

He's the only guy I know who can make one of those hammers run like it should though. He gets a hellofalot of work out of the hammer, no question.
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#7 B Finnigan

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 12:18 PM

Great info! I forgot to post the link to it.

KA 75

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After reading the website I saw some very good advantages to it. The small foot print, relatively light weight and the fact that you locate the compressor and tanks away from it. They suggest having a smaller tank right next to it to refill while the hammer drops. It's also fairly affordable and two guys could move it vs a forklift.

Edited by B Finnigan, 17 February 2007 - 12:22 PM.

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#8 R.H.Graham

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 12:32 PM

ANd to get the most out of it, you want a 2-stage compressor of 5 horse, and 7.5 horse is better.
ANY of the fabricated air-hammers that run from a compressor can be helped-out a lot with an extra tank close to the hammer.

#9 mark stephen

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 06:21 PM

I owned one for a while.Great tool for upsetting,punching ,slitting and working with swage tools.Not a great choise for damascus work if thats what your wondering.

#10 DGiesbrecht

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 09:31 PM

Evening all:

Brand new to the forum and I realize that this topic dates back a while but it was a search in Google on this topic that got me here in the first place. I'm interested in this hammer and was quite excited until I read the last post re: "not a great choice for damscus work". Can anyone expand on exactly why this isn't a good option.

Thanks!

#11 Geoff Keyes

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 11:59 PM

Hammers, in general, are not the tool for making damascus, presses are the way to go. A hammer is a violent action and I've found that mine tends to tear the billet apart, particularly in the early welding stages. Also, since each blow is just a bit different, a hammer introduces randomness to the pattern.

OTOH, a press won't take the thickness much past 1/3rd of an inch, so I tend to draw the last thickness with the hammer.

My hammer will handle 2 - 3 inches of thickness, the press will handle as much as I can muscle up between the dies. I've welded an 8 inch tall stack. For the more complex patterns you need the precision of the press.

Now my hammer is only #50, and the dies are small. A big hammer (#250-#500) with big flat dies can weld a huge stack of damascus, but that is a huge machine. My 30 ton press has a 2 x 3 footprint (not counting the power unit which is not actually in the shop).

Other folks may have other opinions, I like both machines and while I could get by with just one, I don't want to have to.

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#12 DGiesbrecht

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 05:46 PM

Thanks for the insights Geoff. So if I understand you correctly the issue really isn't that the KA75 isn't a good Damascus hammer but that presses, in general, are superior for billet welding and initial drawing. Following that line of thinking then power hammers of any type i.e. mechanical, air, or strikers (KA75) are not the tool of choice for this part of the process.

So that takes me to a different question then. The other hammer that I am considering is the Big Blu 65. So, what I'm trying to compare here is a continuous run air powered hammer vs. an air powered striker. Does anyone have any comments on the pros and cons of these devices in relation to each other?

#13 Sam Salvati

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 06:33 PM

LOL big blu won't do anything worth anything, they are the worst (yet most vocal and advertised hammer) on the net.

I suggest an ironkiss 50, it will outwork the big blue 165 all day long, it's a pro machine. Or an anyang, I love mine! Anyangusa.net
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#14 Kevin (The Professor)

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 03:41 AM

If you want a press, go with Uncle Al's at Riverside Machine or with Ron Claiborne's. I have Uncle Al's. You can see a video of a simillar model on youtube. Our own Jesus Hernandez has a video of himself called something like Working the Bloom. The press he uses there looks like the iteration before the one I bought from Uncle Al. Northern Tool or some other group sells ones that look simillar, because Al actually makes them.

I have to limit ALL of my knife and sword making from forging to grinding to finishing so that it fits in one bay of a two-car garage. This press has a footprint of about 30" x 40", and everything is self-contained. He will even put it on casters for you to roll it if you want.

welcome,

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