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Things revealed in the quench


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#1 Jeff Pringle

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Posted 05 June 2007 - 01:48 AM

So, have you ever pulled a pattern-welded blade out of the quench, admired how the different steels are individually illustrated by the way the scale blows off of each, and thought to yourself: no matter how fine a finish I put on this blade, no matter how many hours of labor get spent putting just the right hilt together, this blade will never look as cool as it does right now…
There’s something about how the intrinsic nature of the material gets revealed at certain points in the process that makes Damascus an endlessly fascinating field of study.
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#2 Sam Salvati

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Posted 05 June 2007 - 03:54 PM

Jeff, i have to agree with you! But I agree sort of on another point and style of blademaking, having to do with the hammer finish. When forged to so close to final shape, after thequench it is pretty much done(other than putting an edge on), and you see all the little surface pits and stuff from the forging, and it just tells so much more of a story than high polished blades. Sweet kris blade too!!!!!!! That pattern is out of this world.
Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

#3 Bennett

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Posted 05 June 2007 - 04:53 PM

So Jeff, when are you going to teach me how to weld like that? :P

Very unique looking blade! I meant that as a compliment BTW :)

#4 Jeff Pringle

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Posted 07 June 2007 - 09:26 AM

Indeed, the hammer texture will tell the story of how the blade was shaped, but if you are working in Damascus the layering will convey that information as well, even after you polish all the hammer marks out. The patternwelding also reveals the internal structure of the steel, in addition to that ‘how I was shaped’ info. All that process evidence is cool, in my book - from hammer marks to steel structures only revealed under a microscope. B)

So Jeff, when are you going to teach me how to weld like that?


:)
Next time you stop by Oakland on a Wednesday night, Jerry – that’s when!
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#5 Sam Salvati

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Posted 07 June 2007 - 11:57 PM

GOod point, i'll have to try soem damascus now.........;).
Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

#6 Bennett

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 06:26 AM

Indeed, the hammer texture will tell the story of how the blade was shaped, but if you are working in Damascus the layering will convey that information as well, even after you polish all the hammer marks out. The patternwelding also reveals the internal structure of the steel, in addition to that ‘how I was shaped’ info. All that process evidence is cool, in my book - from hammer marks to steel structures only revealed under a microscope. B)
:)
Next time you stop by Oakland on a Wednesday night, Jerry – that’s when!
;)

I'd love to sometime. I need to go see the red woods, and pick up some of your awsome black sand.

Also, on the subject of steel structures, you should try using the pitch lap polish. It opens up the steel beter than anything I've seen. You can bring out a pattern weld, without using etchant. Although not quite as contrasty, it brings out "3d" aspects that etching does not. Ask Jesse, he tried it I believe.




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