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  2. Alan Longmire

    Help me finish this. Carving/lil bushcrafter WIP (edited)

    That wheel would work, but seems a bit pricy. Look at these two from Harbor Freight: https://www.harborfreight.com/6-in-general-purpose-bench-grinding-wheel-62475.html and https://www.harborfreight.com/8-in-general-purpose-bench-grinding-wheel-62474.html. You can usually find a coupon for free shipping from them as well. Even better would be to find a shop that is tossing a broken one. You're basically using it like a lapping plate rather than a wheel, so the condition of the wheel face doesn't matter a bit. These are just a cheaper substitute for the EDM stones that were all the rage ten years ago. If I'd known you were using stabilized wood I'd have said absolutely do not burn it in. All that plastic is terrible to breathe, and might even be poisonous depending on what they used. On the plus side, that block is big enough for at least four handles!
  3. Holes are drilled in the steel, that cobalt drill bit went through like butter I cant believe it. But I don't think I messed up too bad on this one at least. I know I could have done better. Yes I did clamp the knife down to the Drill press table before I started drilling lol. So it stayed in one place. But the brass rod seems to fit its not totaly snug but I think once the epoxy's in there it will secure pretty well.
  4. Alan Longmire

    Arc Welded anvils.

    Ah, gotcha. As big as I can blow up the pics, it looks like older arc weld lines, like it was built up out of two older weldments made from stacked plate, with the face, feet, and upsetting block added. I'd want to test the rebound before I bought either, but I'm not headed to Austria anytime soon.
  5. Jeremy Blohm

    Arc Welded anvils.

    I mean the horizontal lines under the main weld line at the waist. I know what you mean about the torch lines...especially the smaller one they didn't take much time to clean them up but then agan do they dont bother the performance of it. The faces are really clean on both anvils though. I would take either one in a heartbeat.
  6. Conner Michaux

    Help me finish this. Carving/lil bushcrafter WIP (edited)

    This will be the handle material its a pretty cool piece of Stabalized Koa. For some reason the pics make it look really ugly..
  7. Well that was easy. Rather than waiting for cutlers rivets that I would have to have shipped I picked up some brass rod. 3/16 inch. Along with a cobalt drill bit thats just a hair bigger than the 3/16 inch brass rod. I got a foot of the brass rod and of course I also picked up some epoxy sadly the Ace hardware store near me did not have the G Flex Geoff Was suggesting. They had the Plastic Steel Epoxy so I'm hoping that will work okay. If it doesn't lol it was only 5 bucks. So no harm no foul. It should work though. But man I can't believe how cheap grand total spent 15 bucks lmao. I was happy about that though. Now it's just hurry up and wait for the scales to get here..... Alright guess I should go drill holes in the tang lol. Hope this works out.
  8. Today
  9. never stop asking questions especially of yourself, the moment you do the art dies, and you will get the most experience out of your failures when they happen. even the forging on your next knife will be slightly easier each and every time you do it, and then you will get addicted to trying out new shapes and new steels, and new parts ect.
  10. This is all still experimental at this point still yet. This first knife is just the test run. After I'm done with it I'll wind up being glad I'm done with it but ready for the next one. So it's kinda been non stop questions from me about it lol. Once I actually gain more experience though questions will be less and less frequent. But I also lack space and tools so things can go kind of difficulty on trying to figure out just exactly how I'm going to get it done. But I'm sure I'll figure it out and manage.
  11. Conner Michaux

    Help me finish this. Carving/lil bushcrafter WIP (edited)

    Would this work? https://www.ebay.com/itm/K-T-Industries-5-7236-6-x-3-4-Bench-Grinder-wheel-Medium-60-Grit/192252780845?hash=item2cc328a12d:g:klIAAOSwTApZb7N6:sc:USPSPriority!83706!US!-1:rk:10:pf:0
  12. 3 years from now you will look back on everything you made and be like... "I did that?!?" it's good to be detailed but don't stress so much, with how thick your tang is its not exactly going to even flex or stress the handle material with any amount of force your arm will put on it. There is alot of knives that basically have drill bits stuck in them and you would never know, knife makers universally admit to it, just pop a new hole near by and the wood will cover it.
  13. Conner Michaux

    Help me finish this. Carving/lil bushcrafter WIP (edited)

    Okay thanks, Yep I meant burning the tang in Guess I wont do that.
  14. Jerrod Miller

    TIG welding 80crv2 filler alloy?

    Another option, since you mention forging it after the weld, is to just go with an autogenous weld (just melt the base materials, no filler).
  15. Alan Longmire

    Help me finish this. Carving/lil bushcrafter WIP (edited)

    Just about any stone will do. 60 grit is good for stock removal, wet or dry. Whatever you can find for cheap. On the handle, that depends on how you want to do it. There is usually some shaping involved with the handle on the knife. And doing that with the blade fully sharp is not a great idea. It can (and will) be kind of sharp, which is why you wrap it in tape when you're working on the handle. The final edge is after the handle is finished. And do you mean burning in the tang? That works and is historically accurate, but it's not easy to do well. On small blades like this one in particular there's a big risk of ruining the temper. If you want to try it, have a hole in the wood that the tang almost fits into before you try burning it in. A too-small hole wastes time and increases risk.
  16. Conner Michaux

    Help me finish this. Carving/lil bushcrafter WIP (edited)

    I was thinking of doing a burn through, seems to be the fastest way. but I have seen people do it on FIF but it doesn't always work, And the judges freak out when ever someone does it. Is that just to make it dramatic or is it actually a really bad idea?
  17. Alan Longmire

    Arc Welded anvils.

    Those lines are evidence of torch-cutting. And flux? If you'd asked one of the old guys that, they'd say what's that? Some used forge-welding compound tossed into the joint, most did without.
  18. Alan Longmire

    TIG welding 80crv2 filler alloy?

    I'd just use mild as filler. Make a stub tang on the 80CrV2 , though, because there will be decarb and other heat-affected zone phenomena at the weld. This will even out during the following forging and heat treating steps, but the mild will pull some carbon out of the 80CrV2 where they touch. Because I don't have a TIG unit, I make a keyhole joint and braze it. The mechanical joint is strong to begin with, and the braze filler I use is around 80K PSI in tensile strength. It's not gonna come apart, in other words.
  19. Joe Wulvz

    TIG welding 80crv2 filler alloy?

    Wow I misread that. ER70-s2 should work fine. although im not sure where to find it but alot of welders used to use 5160 on automotive welds as a filler.
  20. Conner Michaux

    Help me finish this. Carving/lil bushcrafter WIP (edited)

    Could I get a link to a bench grinder stone that would be best for the job? Or can I just buy any? Also should I start making the handle now for wait till the knife is sharp?
  21. Here with another dumb welding question. I'm going to attempt to TIG weld a mild steel bar to a 80crv2 blade for a handle. This is before any grinding or heat treating. The weld will be forged and heat treated with the blade. Initially I was going to use ER312 stainless but realized it will be severely weakened by heating it. So my question is if ER70-s2 is a sufficient filler as long as weld is properly made and heat treated? Or is there a better filler for this purpose? This is simply an experiment to see if there is any viability to this so waste isn't really a concern. If you're wondering why I wouldn't forge weld it the honest answer is that I'm just really, REALLY bad at it. But I can TIG pretty well and I like to experiment with the limits of modern welding techniques. Any information is appreciated.
  22. Okay Vern I'll give that a try, the pins would basically be there to help with the epoxy holding everything together, they wouldn't really be more of say a structurally thing I would think. Unless I make them into a structural piece. Course sand paper? Well I think I'll have to pick up some 60 grit regular old sand paper from HD I need some anyway for other things lol. I am still a bit nervous with the hole epoxy thing. Lol But do you blame me being a noob. That doesn't want to mess up his first knife and make himself look like a complete JA lol. I'm a little weary on actually grinding in slots into the tang itself. If I mess it up Id be afraid that I'd mess up the hole knife. That's my only draw back. That's kind of what I was planning for was letting the epoxy do most of the work. The pins would be to just help with keeping it in place. I guess you would say. I know I'm such a noob. Lol.
  23. You are going to need at least 2 pins on a full tang knife. 1 pin will just create a pivot point for the scales if someone ever drops the knife. Personally, for your first handle, I would just leave the pins straight and let the epoxy hold everything together. Just remember to cut epoxy grooves into your tang and the underside of your scales, and drill extra holes in the tang to help get the epoxy to fully bond everything together.
  24. If you try to pound the pins you run the very real danger of swelling them and cracking your handle material. There are a couple of tricks to get a mechanical lock on the pins but they are really from an "advanced" class. Too easy to screw up without some basic experience. Just scuff the pin shanks a tiny bit by rubbing them on the coarsest belt you have, by hand, not sanding , no power on, to just take the shine off and give the epoxy some teeth to grab. What ever epoxy you use don't get in a hurry to start working on the handle. Let it set in a warm place overnight. Heat from friction can soften the epoxy if you get too eager.
  25. Jeremy Blohm

    Arc Welded anvils.

    What would they have used for flux? The big one looks to have some forging lines in it on the lower part of the body between the feet. I think it's kinda funny looking at the photos the upsetting block on the big one looks way too small and the upsetting block on the smaller one looks way too big.
  26. Geoff Keyes

    Forged in Fire

    On the plus side, my clothes were so bad, I couldn't smell the other guys. G
  27. Jeremy Blohm

    350 lb power hammer build

    I finally made it over to the shop and took a look at the cylinder and it is a 6 inch bore, 1 3/4 inch rod, and a 30 inch stroke with a 250 psi envelope pressure.
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