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  2. Brian Dougherty

    What I might make

    I got to see Lin forge one of those, and agree he has tweaked and tuned both the design and the process to a high level. He handed out a neat diagram of his forging steps along the way. I don't have one, but he might be willing to send it to you if you ask. As a side note: In the demo, Lin moved more metal in one heat than I can in three, and he exerted less energy in the process. Of course that is because he is a real smith, and I am a simply guy with a forge and an anvil
  3. Today
  4. Alan Longmire

    Tempering, I'm confused....

    The "longer time" thing is as Joel said. It does not, however, mean that if you leave a blade cooking overnight that it will be softer than one cooked for two one-hour cycles. I haven't had enough coffee yet to explain further, hopefully someone else will chime in...
  5. Jeremy Blohm

    ABS Journeyman test of production knives?

    This video?
  6. Joël Mercier

    Tempering, I'm confused....

    Ok, i'll try to answer this one Tempered martensite gives more "room" to retained austenite to change into martensite. So, the relatively long tempering is to allow that change of phase and temper the newly made martensite.
  7. Ibor

    Celtic Iron 3

    A long and straight stone whetstone.
  8. Doug Lester

    ABS Journeyman test of production knives?

    A lot of people have made the mistake of thinking that the ABS test knife is the way to make a knife and not a test to see if the applicant can make a blade with certain attributes. Doug
  9. Jeroen Zuiderwijk

    Knifemaker Interview Series, a biography workshop

    Yeah, I had even one involved in a little experiment, using his 3D printer to print out a 3D model of an artifact found online, which I then cast in bronze. The conclusion was that the models and printer did not give the quality in detail required. It would have been a lot easier and more precise to make the model from scratch.
  10. Gerhard Gerber

    Tempering, I'm confused....

    I've run into what I feel is conflicting advice regarding tempering, even here. This is not about one alloy in particular, so if the mods feel this belongs in another section please feel free to move it...... My understanding from the charts that I've looked at basically comes down to resulting hardness being a function of time and temperature, with more heat, longer time or both leading to lower hardness and increased toughness as result etc etc..... Generally the temperatures quoted are the same, but I've seen 2 x 2 hour temper cycles being recommended. I can fully understand wanting to draw back hardness on some types of blades e.g. swords and machetes, but I've watched the Real Engineering HT video several times and I'm getting closer to understanding what happens to steel during the HT process, but tempering is still a mystery to me in many ways. First and foremost I struggle to understand how a relatively low temperature can have so much effect, but also the role that time plays. Am I missing something or perhaps interpreting the charts wrong?
  11. Gerhard Gerber

    Heat treat 5160

    I followed this recipe yesterday, 3x 5160 cleavers and a 52100 draw knife. I found the kiln drops about 100C while taking out a blade, took slightly less than 10 minutes to get back up to temp in each case. What really bothered me was same as the Bowie, the cleavers looked like carbon balloons when I took them out. After quenching the first blade I had doubts that it hardened, went a bit deeper and it was obviously the decarb. I've been lucky with 52100 so far, but accuracy meant the HT on the draw knife was just lovely. The draw knife was forged from a bearing casing by my neighbour Mike, good news is the bucket full of Timken bearing races I have is obviously good steel.
  12. Gerhard Gerber

    ABS Journeyman test of production knives?

    I was under the impression that a JS test knife is as good as it gets....obviously didn't think that through. The topic that's actually on my mind is what performance we can get out of the same steel as opposed to a production knife company.
  13. Doug Lester

    ABS Journeyman test of production knives?

    Ok, I misunderstood the question. I would lean towards saying that you would be hard pressed to find a production knife that would pass the performance test or at least all elements of it. I imagine that you could find a knife that would do the hanging rope cut, chop a 2X4 into twice, and then shave the hair off your arm (or leg if you're into it) but I think that the bend test would be a problem. I don't think most commercial knife factories consider doing a 90° bend with their blades and don't differently harden the spines. That leaves me with a question. If you wanted to buy or make a knife to use why would you want a knife that would bend like that, unless it would straighten to true. Even then I would suspect that it would have cracks all through the blade that would leave it weakened. I would wonder if the blade that straightened back out was made with a mixture of martinsite and bainite. Doug
  14. Adam Weller

    WIP - Sami influenced gift knives

    Haven't had a whole lot of time for this project the last couple days. I did manage to get them all sanded. Next step is the sheath. I'm trying to decide if I want to inlay antler in the sheath or show off more of the pretty wood... Or maybe both options. We shall see. Adam
  15. Troels Saabye

    1200L Charcoal maker

    Jerrod - I can't make a cinderblock construction due to restrictions from the folks my charcoal make is being housed. I see yeah the wiring to keep it in place before the weather protection is mounted. Randy - I can put some in this thread when it is up and running - fuel is just scrap wood or pieces not fit for firewood in our fireplace. The ones I have now look alot like the one Jeremy posted - just two barrels longer.
  16. Gerhard Gerber

    ABS Journeyman test of production knives?

    Thank you gents for some fascinating insights. That was actually my next question, which would you rather own and use, something in the size from ESEE or TOPS, or a knife that would pass the test?
  17. Jeremy Blohm

    1200L Charcoal maker

    I'm going to build one similar to something like this. And the big one I'm going to build is just an upscaled version of it. The main body of this one is a 55 gallon drum.
  18. Jeremy Blohm

    1200L Charcoal maker

  19. AndrewB

    What I might make

    Give it a go I’d be interested to see how it turns out.
  20. Joshua States

    What I might make

    I say go for it Jason. XRhea knives are very cool. You should post a WIP thread on the ABS forum (unless I missed it somehow) Lin would be tickled to see someone doing it (and he might give you a few pointers along the way)
  21. AndrewB

    Dremmel Wood Carving Bits

    Yea I was actually looking at the inverted cone bit I have seems like it would work well for doing what I want I just have to be careful not to carve out too deep for the tang lol.
  22. Joshua States

    Dremmel Wood Carving Bits

    In one of the Arctic Fire videos, Petr Floriniak did a bunch of carving on Boxwood (he called it "Antler for vegetarians") with Dremel tools. I think he used an inverted cone for most of it. Possibly in this one.
  23. Joël Mercier

    ABS Journeyman test of production knives?

    One of J.D's student actually made one that completely sprung back. I've seen the vid, it was quite impressive. My guess is the knife was integrally tempered quite hard and the spine was just thin enough.
  24. Joshua States

    First Casting

    I have an old friend (now lives in TX) that does some sort of Tufa-form casting of silver jewelry. For those of you who do the IG or FB things, look for Jay Chatfield or Chatfields Artisan Jewelry. He gets some great results. The reason I like the delft clay is that you can make the form from anything really, wax, wood, pieces of bent metal, whatever you want and reuse them over and over again.
  25. Joshua States

    A pair of commissions

    Thanks Alan. Every once in a while I do something right! A small amount of progress today. After pinning the scales to the tang, I scribe a pencil line around the perimeter and cut the excess off on the bandsaw. These bolsters will have a beveled front edge. I didn't show the whole superglue and grind process for the dovetails, but it is basically the same as this series of operations. With the front edges ground and polished to 400 grit pace one of them on a flat surface up against at straight face. Install the pins and put 3 drops of superglue on the inside face. DO NOT get the superglue where it will glue the pin in place! Slide the other bolster over the pins and press together up against the straight face. I have an adjustable tilt work rest that I made for my KMG. If you have a similar platen arrangement as this one, you can just tip the platen backwards and achieve the same result. I prefer the tilting rest because I can look at the grind face easier (at least it seems to be that way). Lay the bolster package on the rest and grind the bevel into the front face. Flip it over and do the other side. I do not grind the bevel all the way down to the bottom. I leave a little bit of flat there. This accomplishes 3 things: It leaves the front edge exactly where you positioned it to drill the pin holes. It allows you to see when the bevels are even. (the flat parts are the same thickness) and it adds another facet to the bolster. Facets are crow bait. They catch light and attract the eye. The bevels were mechanically ground to 400 grit (A45 Trizac) and are ready for buffing.
  26. michael cross

    I want to see your Hamon

    Very nice, love the bolster. Good clean line, what did you use to produce the hamon?
  27. Geoff Keyes

    ABS Journeyman test of production knives?

    I'm not sure I understand. What is it about such a knife do you think is a problem? g
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