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  1. The OKCA show is coming up in Eugene Or. in just about 8 days. I've got a couple of new ones for the table. A 10" chef forged 1080, integral with black liners, jade micarta spacer and a stabilized Black Locust burl handle. And a slicer/petty (5160) with brass, black liners, red micarta and stabilized Mulberry burl. Thanks for looking G
    11 points
  2. A freshly completed dagger with a pronounced ricasso and reinfirced point. It has carved steel fittings and German silver accents. The byknives include a small utility blade and bodkin pricker. Everything is nestled into a laminated leather and wood scabbard with tooled fac, roped edges and a fabricated/ carved steel chape. This one includes an integrated hang point in the welt. A full description at: https://www.wintercutlery.com/product/germanic-16th-c-rosette-dagger-set/200
    10 points
  3. made this composite image to show the progression of a piece I'm working on. From left, the customer supplied design, my initial revised sketch, the finalised design, the knife after rough profiling the handle, after the initial carving, and almost finished: now I'm trying to get the blade colour back to where it was in the second last image, which was just a test etch at 320 grit...
    9 points
  4. This has been a very long two years moving back to France from the USA, where I had lived for over 10 years. This was quite an adventure, as I had a shop to move, a cat, a dog, and a fiancee who had never left the bay area before and spoke no French. This took a while and we lived out of my parents' house while looking for our own. We found an old "landaise" farmhouse built around 1825 which ticked nearly all our boxes, but it needed quite a bit of renovation to make it work, so I had to focus on that for a while. The barn (large doors on the left) was going to be my new shop. The place had been used to house donkeys for years, so there was a lot of shit to clean up, literally. After the initial cleanup, I decided I needed additional access, a door to the inside of the house so I wouldn't need to go into the rain to get to shop, and a backdoor and window to improve ventilation. Once that was done, we got married, yay! Then we poured a reinforced concrete floor ... and then we realized that the roof tiles were porous, so we had to redo the roof, ouch. The thing about those old landaise houses is that the outer walls are made of dirt, literally. Not fired bricks, just dry dirt mixed with hay. Although most of the walls were in really good shape, the barn wall was not, as the previous owners had neglected to do the repairs that would have prevent it from being exposed to the rain. I would have loved to keep all the walls as they originally were but unfortunately we had to rebuild part of one with cinderblocks. With this done, it was time to coat the walls, so they wouldn't slowly crumble with the vibrations of the power hammer. Next, I installed some better lights This side of the roof of the house is oriented due south, and is pretty large. We decide to invest in solar panels, but I was concerned about the old framing taking the weight, so I decided to add 4 pillars for safety. I went with oak so that they wouldn't look out of place. Oh and we redid all the electrical, so I got a LOT of outlets installed. Finally I gave it 3 coats of paint to seal the concrete. At last I started unpacking the rest of the shop, whih had been in storage for all this time. Some of the tools were a bit rusty, but everything cleaned up nice. First heat! A few weeks later, we moved the power hammer in and the rest of the big toys. I'm not gonna lie, there's quite a bit of work left to do in the house itself (I'll spare you the story of all the work that happened there!), so things will still be slow for some time. Still, this realy feels like a milestone! Cheers!
    7 points
  5. Finished this one and it's ready to ship out. I just need to take some good photos this weekend. 8" by 2" clayed 1095 blade. Water buffalo horn bolster, stainless steel spacer and Buckeye burl handle with nickel-silver pin. This is the best Hamon I have ever gotten out of 1095 steel. As always, comments and criticism is welcome.
    7 points
  6. Trying a new supply of wrought iron. It's the most steel-like WI I have seen. It came from a chain with links made of 3/4" rod. I had to etch it to confirm it was WI. I couldn't get it to split in the first tests. These are steeled with 1075.
    7 points
  7. Trying to clear my books before mailing knives in the UK gets a lot more difficult next month. This is just 1095, antler, bog oak and copper: let me know what you think....
    7 points
  8. So here is a Leuku forged in 90mcv8 and pure nickel. the handle is composed of reindeer bis, birch bark and curly birch on through tang. As well as a case tattooed on both sides of a stylized crow and a Sami motif. With pleasure for your opinions
    6 points
  9. Just finishing this Nakiri up. I already packed the SC powder, so it's going to stay this way.
    6 points
  10. Today I resumed work on a tanto blade I started over two years ago, just a few weeks before my life was going to change more than I knew. I mean, the blade has issues for sure, but getting to this point feels pretty good. First, because I originally really struggled with copper contaminated tamahagane (original thread), so I'm glad I've managed to get *something* out of it, but also because it took a lot of effort to rebuild my shop in the last two years in order to get back to this point. I posted a few photos of the process of coverting an old farmhouse barn into a moden shop in the Photography forum if anyone's interested. Cheers!
    5 points
  11. Here my first try with the Scabbard chiseling Right side the driving pitch was not cold and the lines not clean. The left side is more better. Now im make first the scabbard with a 0.75mm sheet. And here the work i want make : Ruggero
    5 points
  12. Alright, managed to finished front side of the book, so now I'm about half way.. Not counting the locking mechanism. This cardboard paper cutout represents the dimensions of the book covers. Now I start working on the fittings for the other side of the book. Oh, and I managed to reduce the production time pr. corner down from 13 to 9 hours. I suppose I've found the technique...
    5 points
  13. 5 points
  14. Hi everyone, hope everyone has had a good start of the week - monday and all! I've been working a bit on the metal parts for my little book, and I thought I'd give a glimpse into the process and a preview of the early results: So, from the above picture I start off with having forged out a piece of railroad steel, the machine it flat on both sides, then scribe the outlines of the shapes and machine them using a small bit. These are later cut out and filed to their final shape using needle files. I've then scribed all engraving outlines, and I do inlay channels and inlay first, then cut out the background, and drill holes for the thread. (these will be sewn onto the book covers. Here's a closeup of the top right corner of the book. I just finished the bottom right corner about an hour ago, and will spend the rest of the week completing the other 6 pcs. I'll give a little update when it's all done. Each piece at this stage takes about 12 hours. The "corner" in the image above is in railroad steel, inlaid with 24kt gold and set with one 0,03ct natural white diamond. And that's all for now folk, have a good one!
    5 points
  15. The big news is the shop building is now onsite! Now to insulate and drywall it.
    4 points
  16. Some more of my Things Made This Month...a stacked leather/brass/micarta single-edge dagger a la scian-dubh and sheath, French-style sabatier in 80crv2 and patnered meat cleaver in 1084 with cocobolo, brass corby's and dovetailed bolsters with (respectively) cherry and walnut scabbards, and an ebony and copper hunter from 80crv2 with the best hamon I've accomplished yet. Etching is a voodoo I have not mastered yet..regardless of steel type, I try ferric chloride, then vinegar, and always finish in coffee. Invariably, I hate the first or second etch, polish it out completely, and start over. I keep hearing to clean with alcohol or acetone but for me these always end up leaving streaks and I get a crappy etch. I start with these to get the bulk of polishing compounds off, then wash the blade in simple green and hot water and that seems to be the best.
    4 points
  17. i was practising my wood carving, lot to improve...
    4 points
  18. Hi all, I've been working on my "corners", and I am currently on my last one. During the process I decided to take some progression images to show each process step. Have a look. Alright, that's all for now. Chiao!
    4 points
  19. I started another dirk. Howard Clark gave me this blade to mount many years ago, but I could never quite figure out what to do with it. As it was made from a broken katana blade, I knew I wanted some Japanese influences in the mounting, particularly in terms of some figurative design in the metal fittings. My initial idea was a hound and hare hunting motif, but last month the two most important dogs in my life died within a few days of each other, so that's turned into Abe and Rosie chasing each other (and possibly a rabbit) around the ferrule, and probably both of them napping on the pommel. We'll see how it goes...
    4 points
  20. Another one finished today. Engraved and clay hardened 1095 blade, carved bog oak handle, silver mounts, copper scabbard covered with lambskin, and hand cut Skye Marble cabochon for the pommel setting... let me know what you think...
    4 points
  21. Finished this Cru Forge V blade with Juma ivory handle, (I had posted a prelim photo here in February). The hardware is square wrought which I hammered flat and joined with silver solder hidden so I could get the thickness needed to shape the way I wanted. I used Mark Lee Blue express #1 and followed directions to the letter. The end result color is brownish which I am okay with and I’ve seen this before on wrought. For hand-sanding Cru Forge V, I found EDM stones helped the process substantially rather than just sand paper. Still it took a long time. Now to screw up a sheath! Gary LT
    4 points
  22. here two pics from outside Afrer clleanig the scratches, the sword is ready. Now i make the sheet scabbard Ruggero
    4 points
  23. Hi all, yesterday i finished the sword : Ruggero
    4 points
  24. Hello everyone, This is a unique piece. Knife forged with two sections of a boat chain link from Louis XIV: King of France, Call the Sun King. (1630 to 1715) the heart of the blade and make up 6 carbon steel sections to continue rendering the pattern. The case and tattoo of a frigate: bateay used at the time, as well as on the other side a kraken tantacle for the sailors' stories.
    3 points
  25. Finally finished this one. 3 1/2" forged suminigashi blade with knotwork and runic engraving, boxwood handle carved as a viking style falcon with buffalo horn eyes, copper mounts with engraved silver overlays. Copper scabbard covered in deerskin, with a copper and silver clan crest and mounts, and a buffalo horn scabbard throat: let me know what you think...
    3 points
  26. All of you are incredible. Thank you each so much for your advice. Over the last few weeks we have worked to remove all of the metal that we planned to before heat treating. We drilled holes in handles, ground the blades, did some general smoothing over and cleaning up, and we were finally ready tonight to do the heat treat. We used a small propane forge, and took it up to heat very slowly, using table salt as a rough temperature measure to let us know when we were in the ball park. Each boy put his own knife into the forge, carefully watched the color and checked magnetism, and then quickly quenched the blade in the Parks AAA that we had in a steel ammo can. Everyone stayed safe, we had an absolute blast, no warping or cracking, and everyone's knife skated a file very nicely when we were done. Next week we are doing rough shaping on the handles, and I will make sure we follow the advice above about safety when sanding and shaping the micarta. We will also be parkerizing next week if we have time. The following week we will be doing handle mounting with epoxy, final shaping of the handle, and overall polishing. We are then going to do the kydex sheaths, and finish with final sharpening. Thank you again for your advice, it helped tonight and the last couple weeks to go incredibly smoothly. I'll make sure to post pictures of the end product when we finally wrap up.
    3 points
  27. Getting this one worked up for assembly. Getting a pretty good surface finish. I'm not usually a polished guy, but what the hell. All on the grinder.
    3 points
  28. I got two more finished, plus a piece of jewelry. I should have pics of that tomorrow, but here are the last two blades for OKCA,
    3 points
  29. I cant emphasize enough how much I recommend a papr. Its so much better than a dust or cartridge mask. I feel better, work better, and just might live longer. With this one I'd recommend ear pro since the air line is right under your ear, but I always have earbuds at a minimum anyway.
    3 points
  30. Thought I'd give a little update before I hit the sack... Been working on the locking mechanism for the book, and currently finished the back-side of it - the hinge: I will be fastening it with two nails. I think it will hold just fine - shouldn't be that much tension on it. I have to wait with the rest of the locking mechanism as I will have to finish binding the book. Only then will I be able to cut the length of the hook. And the hook also needs to be sanded flush with the locking mechanism for side A of the book, so I can't really engrave it until this is done. I'll start working on a "holder" for the dagger tomorrow. I want it to stand upright in a presentation holder - so I need to design and make it. It will be simple, nothing fancy... Don't have time for fancy I'm afraid...
    3 points
  31. Made some leather modeling tools I've wanted. W1 rod and knurled stainless tattoo machine grips.
    3 points
  32. Back in the day you'd have been the court jeweler to the king, dude...
    3 points
  33. Over the weekend I did some finish sanding on the K-tip.After surfacing to get it straight, the hamon started showing around 220 grit. I took it up to 1000 grit and will probably get to etching it today.
    3 points
  34. Its some kind of walnut, but I suspect the piece was cut from where the branches meet. Its from the blade I did the other day.
    3 points
  35. Ended up with the Optrel Swiss Air. Price is good, parts are available, works with a beard and glasses, fits under a grinding shield or regilar welding helmet, allows choicenof earbuds, headphones or earpro as needed.
    3 points
  36. I fear there is more art than science to hamon production. I have been wrestling with it for years now and it was always hit and miss for a long time. This is the best I have had so far in terms of activity. Here is my process after a few years of trying different things. I finish sanding to 220 grit before applying the clay. I use two different clays in my process now, satanite and something I mixed up with some red oxide cement color and some boric acid powder. I also harden on the low temp side around 1450F. Quench in Parks 50 oil with no interruption just straight in and bob it up & down. Hardness chisels after quench said the edge was harder than 64 HRC. Tempered back to 61 HRC. Here is the clay for this blade. Mare than that, I cannot say.
    3 points
  37. Just managed to finish this one after far too many delays. 1095 blade with a frame handle with antler on one side and bog oak on the other, and a thin steel frame separating the scales. Silver gallery wire mounts with a blackened steel bolster. Top mount is set with a customer supplied beryl. Copper sheath covered in deerskin with silver mounts: let me know what you think...
    3 points
  38. This was my second attempt at created a traditional style tanto. The first blade broke in the quench but the second seemed to have treated well. I tried to base it as much as I could on artefacts, particularly one I found from the kamakura period. Glad I got some good pictures before shipping it to the customer.
    3 points
  39. Managed to finish the Book -plaque for the book today: Forged meteorite iron inlaid with gold and copper. Here's a video as well: Now I need to start working on the edges of the book, 8 pcs. Have a great Saturday everyone!
    3 points
  40. After the window was opened up, I used a *hand hammer* to break some of the hardened concrete spills from the outside, and I could hear some of the wall flaking off inside the barn. Some parts of it were pretty bad... We call it "torchis", I think it's called "wattle and daub" in English? The whole house is made like this, though the other walls are in MUCH better shape, this one was battered by wind rain and insects. Amazing that it lasted this long really.
    2 points
  41. Big moves! Congratulations on all fronts.
    2 points
  42. My first post, not my first knife. Just finished this today. 80crv2, jade micarta, brass guard, bolsters, and liners. Now I need to do a sheath. Or maybe a scabbard with throat and chape..I have some copper brazing wire I've been itching to try.
    2 points
  43. Why are all my photos upside down? Well, just stand on your head, then.
    2 points
  44. This "shaped" guard and pommel seemed like such a good idea when I was designing the blade. NOW I realize how finicky the fit up is! I like how its turning out though. 10" 240 layers of 1084 and 15n20 with a burl handle and steel guard and pommel. I will probably hot blue the fittings for final fit up. and waiting on this mosaic pin to mount into the handle ( this one is already sold )
    2 points
  45. Been working on the hinge for the locking mechanism of the book recently: It is starting to take shape, slowly. I am worried the lock in its "square" form might be a bit too big on the book. It has to be properly attached though, so I need space for at least 4 pins going through. Simply sewing these two parts on will not do - as they will be under constant tension. Also - I've been playing with the layout of the knife in it's display box: I've landed on the layout above. I am however - uncertain as to how I will attach the knife, sheath and book inside this display case. I thought about magnet behind a padded board - but the steel will become magnetized - and I definitively don't want that. I could buy some foam, cut recesses in it to fit all the parts - but then I'd be hiding the engravings on the sides of the handle and the sheath. I could attatch them using leather straps, or perhaps something elastic directly on a padded flat surface though... In regards to elastic bands - those would loose their elasticity over time - so I don't neccesarily want to do that. Leather straps would have to be very slim - as not to cover the engravings.... I suppose I'll let the ideas cook a bit in the back of my mind while I concentrate on the locking mechanism for the book...
    2 points
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