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    • Alan Longmire

      IMPORTANT Registration rules   02/12/2017

      Use your real name or you will NOT get in.  No aliases or nicknames, no numerals in your name. Do not use the words knives, blades, swords, forge, smith (unless that is your name of course) etc. We are all bladesmiths and knifemakers here.  If you feel you need an exception or are having difficulty registering, send a personal email to the forum registrar here.  

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Showing most liked content since 03/24/2017 in all areas

  1. 6 likes
    As of yesterday - I hope you don't mind the big picture.
  2. 5 likes
    This was an order based on my winning sword from FIF a few changes the customer asked I change the color and the cross section I also did a bit cooler tsuba. The blade is 29" and the sword is 42 overall the steel L6 the tsuba is wrought with silver and bronze inlay the from fittings are bronze with carnelians set in silver as is the saya and tsuka is wrapped in cow skin
  3. 5 likes
    Dear fellow Keepers of the Flame, My activity on this forum has been pretty nonexistent lately. I am sorry for that since I value this place and the exchange we cultivate here. My work has been as much (or more) on the theoretical end of things as it has been about making dust in the smithy. A part of the work with the exhibition at the Deutcsches Klingenmuseum back in 2015 was the development of a tool for visualising sword dynamics based on the ideas of Vincent Le Chevalier. He has a website where he publish his theories of the mechanics of swords and presents methods to calculate them. I have always been intrigued by his work but because of my own lack of understanding of the mechanical theories, I found it a bit challenging to find a practical application of this. What I really wanted to see was a simple graph that could provide a visual representation of important aspects of things that make up a sword´s balance. Vincent and I had discussed these matters before and he generously agreed to dedicate his time to develop calculations and an online tool that could generate the graphs I needed for the catalogue of the Solingen exhibition. My contribution in this was to provide a body of data of documented original swords that he could work with as well as the limits of my engineering challenged brain that demanded simple explanations. Vincent did all the hard work and I simply helped with saying: -Sorry, but I don´t get this... The goal was to have graphs that showed important aspects of sword balance that were close to what we appreciate intuitively when we examine a sword. It was also important that the graphs did not favour one type of balance or dynamics over another, so that one type of sword came out looking "better" than another. In the end we wanted to make this tool public so that others can benefit from it. Vincent has now set up a page on his website that is open for anyone to use. It includes an introduction and a walk through of the practicalities of the tool. Once you familiarise yourself with the various elements of this graph, you will hopefully find powerful and enlightening. I hope you will find it as fun to use and as useful in designing swords as I have. With this tool you can see the effect of changing mass, mass distribution, the placing of point of balance and adjusting the proportion between blade and hilt length. This way you can try out different values before you dedicate time in actual making. You can also generate a graph that can go with each sword you are making for the benefit of your customer. It is a great way to visualise the dynamic properties of your sword. I used this tool to generate the images that are the basis for the graphs in the catalogue, such as this: Here is the link to Vincent´s page: Sword Dynamic Calculator If you have any questions I would be happy to answer them to the best of my ability. If you have observations or critique you would like to share, I would be very grateful to hear what you think.
  4. 5 likes
    Hello Everyone: I have been shamefully absent from both the craft and this forum since Arctic Fire this last Summer. Here is the first piece I've completed since then. It is based on a sketch by my good friend, Petr Florianek. I really liked the lines and asked if he would be okay with me basing my build on his sketch. He generously agreed. As you can see from the attached original sketch, I departed pretty radically from the theme of the piece, but stole the lines. Standard 1095/15n20 mix on the pattern weld. African Blackwood grip. Cast silicon bronze guard. And yes, the artistic piercing is a result of accidentally grinding through the fuller and then deciding to run with it. It's not a bug, it's a feature! Grins, Dave
  5. 5 likes
    And over to the type XV with some pics of the making of its hilt: The guard came out too clunky, so I refined its shape with files, making it thinner and more slender. Extra care is taken to shape the curving bevels towards the ends of the guard. That´s better.... And a closeup. Note that the blade is not yet in final polish.That is the next step, but I have no pics of that, sorry. Some sanding of the pommel. Testing the fit of the pommel and estimating the final height of the rivet block. One of the things that I found especially elegant with the original sword was how thin the edges of the pommel was, contrasting to the proud mid hubs. In this pic the scabbard core has been glued, shaped and fitted and covered with a layer of linen for extra strength. The blade is in final polish and the hilt has been mounted and gripped. The grip core of wood is bound with a fine cord and awaits its leather cover. Leather has been wrapped while wet and glued with hide glue. It is bound with cord as it dries, which will create a nice cord impression in the leather. I shall dye the leather afterwards.
  6. 4 likes
    This sword was the most challenging piece I made so far and it really let me with a wish to achieve some more on my next swords. The blade was mainly made by stock removal, except for the tip and about 10cm of the cutting edge, as the owner wanted it to have some forging on it. It is 1070. Guards and pommel are made from a piece of British wrought iron from the Victorian Age and the inlays are brass. They are heavily inspired on the designs from a type S sword from Gjermundbu, Norway, but it is not made to look like the original. As some of you may notice it also resembles some interpretations of the Gjermundbu sword made by Patrick Barta, although I'm really far from his skills with inlays. At least I have the chance to practice more of this amazing technique on an actual piece, rather than on scraps and left overs. The handle is karelian birch burl from Russia, with one of the most outstanding patterns I've ever seen. The wood was ground to shape and then spent a whole week submersed in linseed oil for stabilization and it got this darker orange-ish color. On the scabbard I used pinewood and it is lined inside with natural wool. Outside I covered it with linen and then painted with very dark brown. The chape is mild steel and the belt bridge is maple wood and although it is glued with modern methods to the linen cloth for safety, the leather strips would do the job alone fairly well. I loved the final result and it really made me feel like a talented crafter, even with all the flaws it have. This excitement is the best part of being a blacksmith/bladesmith. As i usually like to do with swords, the is also a short tale I wrote about it that can be seen in my blog. Here is the link for this sword: http://vferreiraarruda.blogspot.com.br/2017/04/type-s-viking-sword.html Overall length: 94,5cm Blade length: 78,5cm Blade width: 5,3cm Blade thickness at the guard: 0,5cm PoB: 18,0cm Length of the grip: 10,0cm Weight: 1,240kg
  7. 4 likes
    I have been on a bit of a mokume kick as of late. That and working in a fashion that requires me to look at things a bit more closely, and work a bit more tightly. The mokume collar was formed, then worked onto and soldered around a metal core. Each time I have made a knife with a mokume band, I have used a different technique/construction. Each time I learn something new. The blade is 15n20 and 1084, the handle is cocobolo, the mokume is copper, silver, 5%Ag 95%Cu, and 20%Ag 80%Cu, and the inlay for the sheath is salmon skin.
  8. 4 likes
    New season starts this week. And on the 18th:
  9. 4 likes
    Ok. Got into the shop today after facebook reminded me that I was grinding another dagger a year ago today. So, I painted some dykem on the blade, marked my centerline, then went ahead and started grinding. Grind across the center on one side and then bring it back in line on the other. True up the flats on some 80g paper on the surface plate, and then true up the plunges on my home made plunge grinding jig. Trim the corners of the plunges and it'll be on to filing in the guard shoulders come Monday. Some people say daggers are hard. That they're a pain to grind. I learned from watching a video of one of Kevin Cashen's dagger lectures that if you go into it with the mindset of grinding a dagger and not trying to grind a two sided bowie, it's much more pleasant. There is very little about grinding a dagger that even resembles a bowie and getting that stuck in your head makes this process a lot more enjoyable.
  10. 4 likes
    I've had this issue before but only when my bars weren't 100% square or when I wasn't hitting them totally on point for welding and compressed one side more than the other. If your bars are becoming rhombus shaped instead of staying square or are starting slightly off square that could be why they seem to weld and then turn right back around and don't stay together when you try to draw them out.
  11. 4 likes
    Here's Grace... an Aussie with a tail. Talk about protective and always by your side. She's not much help forging though... maybe I need to teach her to get beer or something.
  12. 4 likes
    My doggie sweetie. Took this picture the other morning, she didnt want to be out of bed yet but doesnt like being alone in the bedroom..
  13. 4 likes
    A good friend and professional mentor of my wife used to be a pro skateboarder until a career ending injury sent him down the path of art and photography. Dear wife mentioned that I make knives sometimes so he casually remarked that I should make him one sometime. I thought it would be fun to make a skateboard inspired one so here it is. Blade is 1/4" ball bearings and 4600KC powder and handle is old busted skateboard decks that I glued together. Turns out skate shops in Austin will give you all the broken decks you want for free, they just toss them in the dumpster when they get too piled up anyway.
  14. 3 likes
    In another topic I document the progress of a rapier blade, here I will post pics and progress of a hilt that I wanted to make for a long time but did not dare because of the incredible time and effort needed for such a piece. I am no artist and not very artistically talented, so the result will not look like if Cellini or Negroli had made it . However, you have to start at some point... This is the original that it is based on: I will modify it because this is basically a sidesword hilt that doesn't give enough protection in the right spots for rapier fencing. The mods will become clear as I go along. Here is the humble beginning, just bent bars of carbon steel (the originals usually are made of softer steels, because it is easier to work with and they didn't have tools as good as we do). Furthermore I will heat treat the hilt so it is more resilient to damage when sparring. This awful lot of work should last at least some time. Next is lots of filing. I am using small machinists files, precision files and needle files (all from a very very good german company, St.Egydyer files). It looks quite rough in the beginning, and gets finer and more detailed later on. This project also made the decision to finally buy a pneumatic engraving system. We went for the Enset machine, because it can go at slow speeds and can chisel with power. So this another area that needs practising! This is going to be a longterm project, so please have some patience... If you have any hints or techniques to speed things up, please let me know!!
  15. 3 likes
    Two rather simple seaxes I recently finished. I've been quiet here lately, working on a very challenging commission that has me upgrading much of my equipment, the heat-treatment in particular. These two blades are part of the first group of blades heat-treated in my new furnace, and I needed something new to take to Tannehill, so I went ahead and finished these out. The blades are forged from 1084 and are just under 1/4" thick. Both were grinded down to a zero edge, then refined with a tiny micro-bevel... They are very sharp and cut well for being so thick. One is 10 5/8" overall with a 5 11/16" blade and maple handle. The smaller one is 8 11/16" overall with a 4" blade and bog oak handle. The sheaths are embossed leather with bronze fittings.
  16. 3 likes
    I want to share my progress in making this dagger. It all started whit a chunk of rusted iron my gf dug out of the garden and she challenged me to make a knife. I decided to forge whitout cleaning the steels and added RR (deaminated scrap i was testing whit) and some bandsaw leftovers for the core. As you can imagine the welding was a slow process of deamination refluxing and compacting. Against my exaptations the resulting billet was solid but not fitted for any kind of edge. I decided to add a file in capturing the billet and a birds beak construction for the tip. The result is pleasing as it contains some fun welding and it survived the quench. Now for a handle design.... Let me know what you think, thanks for watching.
  17. 3 likes
    Here’s my latest non-culinary blade creation... I posted over in the sales area, and some folks commented on it over there, but now that it's sold I wanted to bring it in here in case anyone else might see it and find it interesting! The overall theme of this dagger is one of selecting disparate swordly elements and combining them in a dagger size and conformation. The wire-wrap grip is more of a renaissance Italian feature, while the wheel pommel and quillon guard can be found on medieval arming swords of Oakeshott typology. The grip itself is a carved walnut core of ovoid cross section, tapering uniformly to the butt, with four spiral flutes of 1-1/4 twist over the length. This is covered with a herringbone wrap of iron wire which is conformed to the flutes, and trimmed at the ends in 3 lead 7 bight turk’s head knots of twisted copper wire. Overall the feel is slim and grippy. The pommel is forged of coarse wrought iron from an old wagon wheel, etched to show the circular grain flow from forging, and features an integral peen block up top where the mild steel tang end is peened over tight. My “Torch in Cirle” Promethean Knives logo is subtly etched into the center of the obverse side. The guard is forged of the same wrought iron, hot-punched to form a blade seat, and hot-bent at the tips, with a shield-form boss at the grip center. Grain is etched to reveal forging flow. The blade is a composite of merovingian, viking, and persian pattern welding styles, being composed of four bars of left/right twist merovingian style layup, with a center-grind bar of “zanjir” pattern running down each side. The “zanjir” means “chain” in Urdu, and is a historical pattern that can be found in Persian weapons from the 1700’s, as well as much earlier blades from the pan-Celtic world. It is composed of three, five layer bars- a central chain or snake bar with two straight edge bars. Technically that makes this blade a 10-bar composite. It is made of 1080 and 15n20 steels, and tempered into the Rc 58-59 range. It features 8” hollow grinds and is currently razor sharp. This dagger won “Best in Show” and “Best Damascus Knife of Show” at the OKCA knife show, Eugene Oregon, April 8th 2017. I'm keeping the plaques, but there are two additional smaller metal plates with the awards that will come with the knife, suitable for display with knife or to be installed on a display case/box. Measurements: Blade length, tip to front of guard- 11-1/8” Grip, front of guard to end of pommel- 5-5/8” Overall length- 16-3/4” Guard width, 5-1/8” Effective grip length, rear of guard to beginning of pommel- 4-1/8” Blade width at guard- 1-3/8” Blade thickness, midrib at guard- .300” Pommel width, 1-1/4” round Balance point is 1.5” in front of guard. Overall weight is 14.75 oz. Enough yakking, here’s pics and a vid! Enjoy! Edited just now by Salem Straub
  18. 3 likes
    Been fairly busy lately with shop improvements. Had time to get a few pieces done. Found a new leather guy. I will not be making any more sheaths myself. This guy is amazing... and is reasonable. Made a custom butcher block cutting board and had it laser engraved for a client. The hunter had 2 other brothers, but they sold before i could even get them home. One with eastern red cedar, one with osage.
  19. 3 likes
    Awesome knife. Love the integral bolster and, as Chris already pointed out, the transition from the bolster to the handle with the convex grooves is elegant. Thanks for keeping this thread about the knife and not about the politics associated with the donation guys! Dave
  20. 3 likes
    Hi All! I'm pleased to offer for sale a big seax with a serpent in the blade. It was fully hand forged of 80CrV2 tool steel, wrought iron and the serpent of 23 layers. The handle is sculpted from: brass, leather, Hungarian Plum (the root part), leather and the big piece of wood is elm. Plus 3 copper pins. It is rather for a big hand. Some dimentions: Ov. len. 365mm / 25,9" Bl. len. 239mm / 9,75" Bl. wid. 32mm / 1,30" Bl. thick 6mm / 0,25" Asking 180$ and I think it is reasonable price. New price 170$ Shipping: 15$ standard, or 25$ express. Contact via PM here or email me: krylip (at) gmail.com I have also some other blades available here:
  21. 3 likes
    At the risk of sounding overly dramatic, here's one of the last knives that will be leaving my shop for quite some time. As I start the next chapter of my life (graduating college), I'll have to move to a more suburban area outside of Austin for work. I'm hoping I can find a house and continue stock removal out of the garage, however we'll see how tolerable the neighbors will be. Anyways, here's a nice little bird and trout (?) knife that I kinda just came up with one day. It has ebony bolsters and is finished off with burmese blackwood. Steel is W2 quenched in peanut oil.
  22. 3 likes
    This fighter has a blade of 336 layer random of 1080 & 15N20. The raised clip has an actual sharpened edge. I gave the blade a slight recurve mainly for aesthetics. The integral sub-hilt guard is a 21 layer Damascus turned on edge so that the layers would follow the sub-hilt when forged to shape. The handle is a black walnut burl with 416 butt cap & pommel nut. This is the first raised clip blade that I've made in quite a while. Let me know what you think. Gary
  23. 3 likes
    I would say the science is diffusion and grain growth (which is kind of like a diffusion process). Normalizing after the long soaks probably help solidify the weld as well due to the grain refining across the weld interface.
  24. 3 likes
    I cannot guarantee that this will work, but it's worth a shot. During your initial weld everything seems to stick, then it comes apart when you try to draw it. So take it apart, clean the adjoining surfaces, flux and re-weld. Let's assume it appears to weld together. Next heat, reflux, let it soak at welding heat for 15-20 minutes... This will strengthen the bonds between the rods. After 15-20 minutes, gently yet firmly hammer it together, treating it like it didn't weld the first time. Reflux, and let it soak again. Now see if it holds together when you draw it out. I do not know the science behind it, but these long soaks have allowed me to save a few multiple bar billets despite the experts saying it can't be done. Be sure to normalize the heck out of it afterwards to get the grains back down to a reasonable size.
  25. 3 likes
    Here’s my latest non-culinary blade creation... The overall theme of this dagger is one of selecting disparate swordly elements and combining them in a dagger size and conformation. The wire-wrap grip is more of a renaissance Italian feature, while the wheel pommel and quillon guard can be found on medieval arming swords of Oakeshott typology. The grip itself is a carved walnut core of ovoid cross section, tapering uniformly to the butt, with four spiral flutes of 1-1/4 twist over the length. This is covered with a herringbone wrap of iron wire which is conformed to the flutes, and trimmed at the ends in 3 lead 7 bight turk’s head knots of twisted copper wire. Overall the feel is slim and grippy. The pommel is forged of coarse wrought iron from an old wagon wheel, etched to show the circular grain flow from forging, and features an integral peen block up top where the mild steel tang end is peened over tight. My “Torch in Cirle” Promethean Knives logo is subtly etched into the center of the obverse side. The guard is forged of the same wrought iron, hot-punched to form a blade seat, and hot-bent at the tips, with a shield-form boss at the grip center. Grain is etched to reveal forging flow. The blade is a composite of merovingian, viking, and persian pattern welding styles, being composed of four bars of left/right twist merovingian style layup, with a center-grind bar of “zanjir” pattern running down each side. The “zanjir” means “chain” in Urdu, and is a historical pattern that can be found in Persian weapons from the 1700’s, as well as much earlier blades from the pan-Celtic world. It is composed of three, five layer bars- a central chain or snake bar with two straight edge bars. Technically that makes this blade a 10-bar composite. It is made of 1080 and 15n20 steels, and tempered into the Rc 58-59 range. It features 8” hollow grinds and is currently razor sharp. This dagger won “Best in Show” and “Best Damascus Knife of Show” at the OKCA knife show, Eugene Oregon, April 8th 2017. I'm keeping the plaques, but there are two additional smaller metal plates with the awards that will come with the knife, suitable for display with knife or to be installed on a display case/box. Measurements: Blade length, tip to front of guard- 11-1/8” Grip, front of guard to end of pommel- 5-5/8” Overall length- 16-3/4” Guard width, 5-1/8” Effective grip length, rear of guard to beginning of pommel- 4-1/8” Blade width at guard- 1-3/8” Blade thickness, midrib at guard- .300” Pommel width, 1-1/4” round Balance point is 1.5” in front of guard. Overall weight is 14.75 oz. Price is $2000 plus insured shipping. NOW SOLD. I can include a few pictures taken during the making of it as well, in case of any interest in that…. I will ship internationally, provided item is legal in destination country and all additional shipping is paid for. Enough yakking, here’s pics and a vid! Enjoy!
  26. 3 likes
    Gotta get some better pics but she's nearly done. A little more cleanup and finish work to go.
  27. 3 likes
    21 1/2 inch spring steel blade with mild fittings and charred oak handle topped by a 20 side die as a pommel nut. I thought i'd just have a little fun this time, the next will be a little more historical. let me know what you think
  28. 3 likes
    W2 and Curly Oak: Single Twist, Gidgee, Wrought Iron and Ivory inlay: San-mai and Bakelite: Laddered Ws and Koa:
  29. 3 likes
    Hi All: Many of you may remember Arctic Fire 2013, where a group of us made a blade from smelt to finish in just a few days. If you don't know what I'm talking about, here is the video: So, you may have wondered, if you watched the event, what ever happened to the backup blade? Well, I've had it for these last four years, and I'm finally getting around to finishing it. While I cannot promise a blade of the quality that was produced at the event (for the simple and self-obvious reason that I'm not the equal of Jake or Petr when it comes to carving, or Jul when it comes to jewelers work, or hell . . . the list goes on of all the guys I'm not equal to!), I'll do my best to do justice to this piece. I have a few bits I've saved from the 2013 event, such as a nearly complete wax carving by Jake of the lower guard that he abandoned for a reason I forget, as well as a rivet block that has a porosity hole in it that I plan to use by filling the hole with a garnet set in silver. I like the idea of incorporating a few bits of the original build in this "homage" piece. Also, of course, while I did most of the forging on this blade, it was 90% ground by Michael Pikula, and Shane Harvey helped with some of the pattern weld. So, this will still be--in a sense--a collaboration. Also, if you remember from the video, the upper guard was lost due to my kiln being too short for a complete burn out, so Petr had to carve an upper guard out of antler instead. In this build, I plan to complete the original upper guard design. Here are a few photos of the blade after polishing and etching. You'll note the difference the hairpin core has on the overall aesthetic. The core has the same number of layers that Arthur's war band had in it (it was going to be one of our clues). The edge material is 1200 layers or so. Also a shot of the bits and sketches I have left over from the 2013 event. I'll post WIP photos as the build progresses. Cheers, Dave
  30. 3 likes
    And the crowd goes wild. Or not. This is the close cousin of the earlier one, I probably forged them about the same time. No, I just realized, the first one is an old blank that had a really different form, more of a spear point, and I never liked it, so it sat in the rack . I decided to re-grind the tip, and that happened about the same time as this one. Another small bowie BL 7.5" OL 12.250 Steel 1080 NS guard and butt cap Handle Indian Stag, Bloodwood and Osage This one has a really different feel, very substantial in my hand, whereas the other forces me into a fencing grip, this one fills the hand for a cut. There is a lot of texture to this one, I really like it. This will be on the table in Eugene in a week. Geoff
  31. 3 likes
    @Wes Detrick @Jon Cook @Richard Furrer @Gerald Boggs @Joshua States Hi guys, Thanks for the encouragement and the kind words. Really helpful. I grabbed 30 mins last night a built the pillow block mounting plates for the drive shaft on my belt grinder. A small but important task which will get me that little bit closer to the completion. While this conversation is not in person, it helps me no end. To share some personal information about myself, I suffer with PTSD and at times its very hard for me to connect to others, so this forum and space is the first time in years i have 'put myself out there' if you will. And its been a really good experience. I have been disconnected from all forms of 'social media' for 3 years now. Anyway, just saying thanks I guess is the reason for this post.
  32. 3 likes
    This is Grouvolk Bruno von Gruff as a young feller navigating for us out on a hunting trip. I am Von Gruff on all the other forums I visit. Tired after a hard day doing what dogs do And in his prime
  33. 3 likes
    here is my Holly (kelpie, border collie and aussie shepard), doing her best "I can totally help fix the wood splitter by being this close dad" look.
  34. 3 likes
  35. 3 likes
    My best friend (again) and his new best friend, and the reason I have been so quite recently. Please all welcome him to our community. This is my two week old son, Sebastian Bailey. Born, 11/03/2017
  36. 3 likes
    I was happy to pick up one of George Ezell's blades a little while ago and finally got everything put together. BL 6.5", OAL 11.5". Handle is pacific yew with bronze and deer.
  37. 3 likes
    My home has been invaded! All sexy!
  38. 3 likes
  39. 2 likes
    http://www.smbc-comics.com/comic/dungeon-classes
  40. 2 likes
    Also a bit of a rundown of how I plan out something like this project.
  41. 2 likes
    This is a blade that's been in the work for months, finally I am happy to be able to show it off! This concept came to me quite some time ago, and it took me winning Forged In Fire to finally scrounge up to the funds to move forward on. The handle and general blade shape was waterjet cut from 1/2" thick 5160 spring steel, then forged to shape from there. Had to get inventive with some stuff - sanding the twisted areas was a nightmare - ended up leaving bits of forge finish some places because I wanted to allude to it's forged nature. I gently hot blued the handle to protect all the nooks n crannies. Overall I am very happy with this knife; it's sharp as the dickens and light in the hand. Let me know what yall think, Theo
  42. 2 likes
    Is there any chance you're decarburizing the outer surface and raising the welding temperature without knowing it? Also, Emiliano hits on a good point. I found that when I became really anal about squaring things off, the welds took much better.
  43. 2 likes
    another shot of this guy I forgot to post earlier. MP
  44. 2 likes
    SOLD 105mm edge length Sole authorship Damascus blade, flamed walnut handle, shibuichi spacer, silver pin Very light, very comfortable in the hand. Comes with a brown ostrich leg sheath. Price is $450.00. PayPal and (basic) shipping included
  45. 2 likes
    here is a how to vid to show how I go about forging a kitchen knife blade.
  46. 2 likes
    Progressing slowly... BTW I have a question about the grip. Is it better to make it from one piece of wood or from 2 halves? I usually make grips from one piece but in this case I consider hot peening the pommel first and then gluing 2 pieces of wood.
  47. 2 likes
    Well still a bit of clean up on the blade but it's getting there!
  48. 2 likes
    Hi Gents This Bowie has a blade from W-1, a full flat grind, blade length is 260mm, blade thickness is 6mm on the spine, the blade width is 43mm and the overall length of the knife including the pommel nut is 395mm. The gun blued S-shaped hand guard has a vine and thorns filed along either edge and clam shells on each end. There are three brass coined spacers with the gun blued bolster, which has a filed centre groove and tram lines around either edge. The Sambar stag handle has a gun blued butt cap filed to match the flutes in the antler and is held in place with a gun blued pommel nut. The sheath is of a Mexican loop style dyed mahogany brown with a python skin inlay on the front panel of the sheath. I hope you like it, thank you for taking the time to look. All comments and critique very welcome. All the best Steve image hosting no registration image hosting no registration image hosting no registration image hosting no registration image hosting no registration image hosting no registration image hosting no registration image hosting no registration image hosting no registration
  49. 2 likes
    This Bowie has a 300 layer Damascus blade of 1080 & 15N20. The look of a low layer on the spine and a high layer on the cutting edge is solely from the way that I beveled it as it's all the same billet. The handle is African Blackwood with a raised checkered area.. The butt cap is a drop off from another Damascus billet turned on edge. The remainder of the fittings are 416. This is the first time that I've done a partial checkering this way. Let me know what you think. Thanks, Gary
  50. 2 likes
    I am a retired woodworker and have been making the odd knife for about 35 years so this is how I would cut that block. I have numbered them so that you would get a pair of slabs that would be matching as close as possible on each side of the knife. The ones on each end would be about an 1 1/2 x 1/2 (less saw cuts) and the ones in the center would be closer to 2 x 1/2