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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/30/2021 in all areas

  1. Hi everyone, I just finished a tanto I had been working on for the last 3 weeks . The blade is W2, uchi-sori with a 7 1/2" nagasa, and the fittings are copper with shibuichi inlays. Here are the photos of the build: Profiling: Hardening: Polished: Now for the part that's really time consuming, the fittings: For this blade, I decided on a ginkgo leaf theme, a symbol of pe
    12 points
  2. Hi guys, I recently posted a preview of a blade I have been working on, and I have now finally been able to finish the complete knife - sheath not included... thought I'd give a bit of a new preview of the whole thing. All inlay in both handle, bolster and blade are 24 karat gold wire, 0,7mm in thickness. Bolster is in meteorite iron - which is nerve wrecking to work with when doing inlay. Some areas are more fragile than others, and if you look closely at the "R" - you'll see the outline of a
    10 points
  3. Coffee etch and a little oil.. very happy with it. My grinder finally broke down so no handle or any more knives for a while, but there’s an ameribrade 2x72 coming soon.
    10 points
  4. I got the photo proof back yesterday from Whetstone studio of my full set. Some of these you have likely seen already. These are the five that were in the judging room
    9 points
  5. Hi everyone. When I was a teen there was an illustration in a Dungeons and Dragons book of a sword that was shooting a lightening bolt, or energy, or something. The drawing showed the sword encased in wavy, crackling energy or magic or something. Here is my attempt to capture that feeling in pattern weld. Minor inclusion near the base of the blade, but . . . meh . . . still looks okay. This is an Oakeshott XII blade, copied pretty exactly from Peter Johnsson's design. I haven't come up with a hilting plan for it yet. Probably bronze fittings and carved black
    8 points
  6. A "scholars" knife. 1 ci of damascus, a bit of copper and some bamboo. Ebony spacers. This was fun G
    8 points
  7. I had 2 goals for this design. I wanted to leave the shanks and bows as-forged, and I wanted the scissors to close without having to close my hand. The blades are mild steel with O1 cutting edges and rust blued. I've decided this style - bows created by bending the shanks - makes more sense for my shop than the punched and drifted style I had been making. Scissors have lots of surfaces to finish. This design eliminates the grinding, filing and polishing of the bows. It also lets me easily change the size and shape of the bows. To avoid sharp corners, I forged the shanks round befor
    8 points
  8. Finished this one up today. It has a 3 1/8" blade and a 4 1/4" handle. The steel is 1080 and the handle material is brass, bighorn sheep, and amboyna burl. This is probably one of the cleanest EDCs I've done yet. I used alignment pins and did most of the handle shaping off the blade, and the handle actually came out looking like I wanted it to. Thanks for looking. Faye,
    7 points
  9. It's been a while since I've posted anything so I thought that I'd show you one that I just finished for the Arkansas Show: The blade is a two pattern mosaic of 1080-15N20 & 1084 powder. The guard is a wheat twist made from four 1/4" round rods (hot blued). The handle is mastodon bark with 416 & damascus spacers.
    7 points
  10. Thanks Alex! Though today that may not be the case because it’s polishing time! This is the blade after about an hour on a 120 grit Sun Tiger stone. I’m hoping this was the longest stage of polishing because I had to even out the dips from filing and warps from hardening as well as thin down the edge. Not sure exactly how high I’ll take this on stones, but I have plans for the final polishing step. Next up is 220, then starting the handle!
    6 points
  11. I was recently contacted by someone through my FB page asking about a dagger I made several years ago (2016?). He wanted to know if I could make another one and how much it would cost. Now you know why I use templates! I have the blade, guard, and handle templates from this dagger and can reproduce a fairly accurate copy. This is a 9-bar blade, and it's accordion cut, so I need a big hunk of steel. Here is the starting billet. 3.25" x 1.5" x 5.5"
    6 points
  12. Made some progress on fittings and tsuka for a tanto:
    6 points
  13. I'd like to share two rapier hilts I've made during the past year. I practice historic Italian rapier (techniques of Capo Ferro primarily) and so it's a pleasure that these are being used in practice. I did not make the blades on either sword, however, I'm realizing I cannot find a blade that I am fully happy with and so am preparing to make one to my own specifications in the near future. Maybe I'll post here of my progress on that when I start. The grip on the first is Irish bog oak. On the second is ebony. The second hilt utilizes a few old fencing blades in the design as per t
    6 points
  14. Still gotta work on the tang some more, but here’s an afternoon’s work before it got to be too hot to work any more lol. As in the title, I forged this from a length of 1/4”x2” 80CRV2. I forged a distal taper into the blade, and am excited to get this thing ground and ready for HT. It will be the first knife I’ve ground on my 2x72 grinder, so I’m looking forward to not using a 1x30 for everything. Thanks for looking, and I’ll post updates as I get stuff done *Edited to add* I have done some profile grinding to the spine and edge, but I mana
    6 points
  15. I’ve been kicking this one around for a few months. I’ve always loved the old Mexican Bowie knives and I’m a native Texan.. a cowboy in a world that no longer has a use for me. This is my take on a bowie I’d have worn if I had time on my side. 1084, nickel, and figured walnut. I actually clayed it but the hamon was a bit nuts. My pictures aren’t excellent. She’s a big girl. A smidge over 10” blade. The nature of the finish makes it nearly impossible to photograph..
    6 points
  16. I did some forging that I am quite happy with, my new gas forge really is a time saver. on the left a sheet metal template, the right is straight from the forge, almost a shame to grind it. This knife will be subjected to ABS journeyman testing, I finally got some time to spend on that next to commissions and daily life.
    6 points
  17. Ameribrade 2x72 has arrived Tool arms get here soon. This will be a game changer for sure
    5 points
  18. 5 points
  19. I guess that by now my love for nagel equipped blades comes as no surprise Forged from a harrow spring and is 5mm thick at the front of the bolsters and tapers in all directions from there, no plunge lines and the tang is deeply fullered under the scales. Having no truly parallel surfaces really does make assembly fiddly but it helps capture the look and feel of the originals and is surprisingly light for it's size. Scales are second grade ebony that I actually prefer over first grade ones as they have a lot more interesting colours. I got various chunks of
    5 points
  20. My brothers girlfriend is a avid hiker, naturalist and forages for mushrooms etc. I built a foraging knife for her, it’s a small blade with stabilized box elder handle and mosaic pins . I used 1084 and 15n20 for the blade. I wanted the brush to be simple and replaceable so I used a natural fiber threaded through a ¼” hole at the butt of the handle and used a whipping to secure it. The sheath is a Sheridan style with a fringe I made from some 3 oz leather. I am a beginner and want to thank all the experienced bladesmiths who post because I am learning a lot from you all.
    5 points
  21. The Old Dominion Blacksmith Association held a chisel forging workshop at the Floyd Center for the Arts. Welding on the high carbon for the edge turned out to be an excellent way of introducing new folks to forge welding. Since it's just a piece of 1" square sitting on top of the chisel body, the only tricking part was being steady while putting it into the fire and removing, only had one fall off, but he got it on the second try :-) Everyone, including some novices were successful in getting the weld.
    5 points
  22. The inspiration for this was an old cleaver my grandpa had in his kitchen that was his grandpa's. It was most likely made by a country blacksmith. The spine was dented and banged up from being hammered through pig and cow carcasses the handle butwas chipped and worn but it was still usable and razor sharp. I don't know what happened to that cleaver but we decided to make one in homage to that old cleaver. We wanted it to look like a country blacksmith made it and to have small imperfections because we thought it would add to the over all look. The blade is 5160. The handle is Mexican desert ir
    5 points
  23. Had to do some fieldwork today. Not fun, but the temporary office space was nice.
    5 points
  24. And the last one of those. Clay hardened c100 steel, 3.2mm at the shoulder and had a convex distal taper. 58mm tall at the heel and a 22cm cutting edge. Buffalo horn, tin and cocobolo in the octagonal handle
    5 points
  25. 5 points
  26. I've done a few projects with found steel and wood, so I figured I would do it for the KITH this year. In addition, I am finally taking the advice I got from a Design and Critique thread from a while ago and will be adding a few more "rules" to try and get a finished knife that captures the spirit of older pieces. All of the materials for the knife and sheath were found or harvested by me. That includes the glue and finish, which will be pine pitch and birch tar respectively. In addition, I won't be using any power tools or sandpaper for the shaping. I was thinking about making a few scrapers,
    4 points
  27. Big afternoon with all the handles on and in the clamps under the lights for the night. There is from the left canvas micarta, giraffe bone, rosewood, spalted maple burl, desert ironwood hickory burl, amboyna, koa, double dyed box elder, and two of hickory burl
    4 points
  28. Hey everyone! Here's a project I'm nearly finished with! I started messing around with some ideas for a small wolf tooth fire striker. This is the prototype, with teeth about the same size as the ring I made a while ago. Made from iron and folded steel. Next one will be in my own home made materials. IMG_0745.MOV Around the time I finished it up I got a mail call! An original wolf tooth spear that I cleaned and etched and sealed. I started to reverse engineer the construction of the spear based on other examples I had seen and
    4 points
  29. Finally finished it last night.
    4 points
  30. Thanks guys! This is a project I've wanted to do for a while. I wasn't quite happy with the forging. This is the first case of doing things differently than I normally would; the end of the tang wasn't pointy enough, which would have been a pain to fix with a file. A little hammering and now there is less tang and more blade which is also somewhat narrower. This is going to be a hidden tang with homemade glue, so I wanted it to have a good taper to develop some holding force when I pound it in. I may do some filing tonight when it's not 100+ degrees in the shop.
    4 points
  31. Those of you that know me, know that I love making the historical style of knife which usually means large. Recently however I accepted a commission to design & build a knife for a customer who has a collection of knives that are <5" OAL. For this I decided on a boot knife of random pattern damascus with a full tang which I left proud for some rope roll filework. The scales are blackwood with 416 bolsters. Not my typical post but I occasionally enjoy making something different. Let me know what you think.
    4 points
  32. This was a fun diversion between knives: Made this for a guy at work. A little forging and a little welding. I only have a Lincoln stick welder, so I used some 1/16 rods. Man, I need a MIG.
    4 points
  33. Introducing......the mammalian protuberance pommel.
    4 points
  34. Every so often you just have to make something for your self. This one came out of a "Serbian" cleaver project. The cleaver went off to it's new owner (and he's happy with it. I hated it.) I had no luck HT'ing this stuff, it just turned into a potato chip, so I left them as found (pretty hard) and cut them with an angle grinder and ground them carefully. I'm waiting on some parts, so I decided to finish up some quick stuff. Steel "?" 1095 at a guess Handle: Stabilized black locust burl Very light very sharp. G
    4 points
  35. Did some profiling today, And played with some clay... Dirty hamon etch (220 grit!) between tempering cycles, because I'm that impatient. Looks like it worked out okay, curious to see what that'll look like with the final polish.
    4 points
  36. It’s been a hot minute since I updated this, but I got the blade quenched just a bit ago and it’s now in the oven for tempering… The pattern isn’t even from side to side, but I’m still extremely pleased with myself for getting this far on this one. Can’t wait to finish her up and show it off to you guys.
    4 points
  37. Forges work by radiant heat. With solid fuels like coal, the steel is in contact with the burning coke, getting mostly radiant heat with a little conduction. With gas, the idea is to contain the heat of combustion as efficiently as possible, which usually means an enclosed space. Insulation helps efficiency since it reflects heat, or at least keeps it from dissipating. Hard firebrick is a heat sink, and does get very hot indeed. They rarely (the thick ones, anyway) get hot enough to glow on the outside since clay is such an inefficient conductor of heat, but they heat up very s
    4 points
  38. Hi all, yesterday i grind the bevel edge. The seax its ready for hardening. I make it this evening. Ruggero
    3 points
  39. Another puck of similar composition as the last bar made and set to the side to keep the momentum rolling. Perfect melt. Super undercooling. Due to extremely slow cooling, the structure solidified with the cementite moving from primary dendrites to GBC. The center, last to solidify probably did so in more of a jolt in comparison to the rest with the presence of dendrites. Should be a super, easy forging with the health of the ingot and composition. No graphite formation. Carbon looks to be around 1.6-1.7%.
    3 points
  40. Took some time out this morning to play with something I had wanted to try for a while now but first I had to make a hot cut which is essentially just a blade on a stake to fit in the hardy hole on the anvil so the easiest way to get one was to convert a cheap hatchet so that was the first step. With that done I cut a strip off a plate of 5/8 thick steel and split it to over center from the top and the bottom but on opposite faces. Into the forge and started the splitting process It took a couple of heats to get it formed and flattened.
    3 points
  41. This statement, coupled with your latest pics, tells me that you have a very bright future in this craft.
    3 points
  42. I made this as a trade for some silver pieces for another knife, which is on the back burner for now. 1080 acid washed and stone tumbled, about 4 inches flat back grind, like a yari Black dyed walnut (also flat backed) and a blackened steel spacer The new owner wants as plain as possible, it was a real effort not to do some sort of embellishment. I hope she likes it.
    3 points
  43. Hello my fellow magicians! Allow me to present to you my (hopefully successful) project of experimental archaeometallurgy, which I am writing my dissertation about. After 30+ burning cycles, ultimately ending in various degrees of failure, I introduce to you my very first buttons, created by the 'co-fusion' process: and weighing in at 40 grams: Meet my button 'A', rapidly cooled: And button B, cooled with the furnace: A sneak peak of the dendritic structure on sample 'A'. Button 'B' has unfortunately leaked a
    3 points
  44. Using different alloys to obtain different patterns..
    3 points
  45. My very first hamon.
    3 points
  46. Simple tools, and the ability to use them, are all you really need. That, and a decent amount of dedication to learning the craft. From a bladesmithing standpoint, all the information you need is available here somewhere. You just have to look around and do the reading. A lot of it is useful for general blacksmithing as well, but thats definitely not the focus of this site. A fairly accurate saying is that any blacksmith can be a bladesmith, but not any bladesmith can be a blacksmith.
    3 points
  47. OK here goes. Some of your new comments give me more to work with. The 300+ layer PW is something of a universal benchmark and definitely something to be proud of. The steel (at least the side you have chosen to show us) looks very solid with no weld flaws or voids. Serious kudos for that. The design leaves much to be desired, Seax inspired or not. The break from the spine of the blade to the spine of the handle looks like a mistake. It looks like it should be a straight line, but you missed it. If you wanted to have the blade spine sweep upward, it should do so with a gentle curve,
    3 points
  48. Trying out my new forge. Why build it if ya not gonna use it eh?
    3 points
  49. It still looks like a +3 hit/+3 damage sword to me!
    3 points
  50. Thanks for all the advice fellows! Through some hammering and filing I’ve got what I was after. Now to finish everything else..
    3 points
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