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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/28/2021 in all areas

  1. Hello all, Long time lurker, first time posting! I wanted to share with you the first blade that I forged from some crucible steel. I first found wootz about 8 months ago and instantly fell in love with the watered pattern, I had to make a knife. I watched tons of youtube videos, read research articles until my brain went numb and got lost on sketchy Russian/Ukrainian websites searching for bulat with google translate. In the end I followed pretty closely to what is outlined in the Verhoeven and Pendray research articles about wootz. However, I pulled significant amounts of inform
    12 points
  2. My mother commissioned me to make this one as a gift for her grandson (my nephew). He likes to fish and hunt, and my sister actually picked out a pattern from one I'd made years ago. It has contemporary elements like the ricasso and and etched logo, but I had to incorporate the seven pin bird-head handle to keep a little 18th century vibe going. I forged the blade from 1084. The handles are, as Dr. Jim would say, bovine ivory (cow bone). The pins are 6p finish nails. Leather sheath dyed with iron acetate and hardened with heat and bee's wax. 4.25" blade, 8" overall.
    12 points
  3. My humble beginnings began when I was just a kid. Always fascinated by fantasy, I made some wooden Legolas swords from the Lord of the Rings, and Aragorn's elvish dagger out of metal. Unfortunately this was before I had a camera, much less a camera phone (they didn't exist) so I don't have a photo of those. Moving on to 2014, halfway through college, the knife making bug bit me when I made the knife in the first photo. Un-hardened stainless steel from some scrap with plenty of scratch marks and mistakes.... but it looked cool I guess! Started a low output business, ran it successfully for a fe
    11 points
  4. 1080/15N20 forged by maker, eyed crushed W's with stainless fittings and a Walrus handle.
    10 points
  5. Hi everyone! Hope you've all survived the Holiday feasting without too much abdominal pain! (and yet we have New-Year eve right around the corner! ) Anyhow, I've been working on this Seax inspired blade... It is not exactly historically correct - but I weighed my need for self expression higher than historically accuracy in this project. Below is a preview of the blade itself. Currently I am working on the handle - more specifically the rear bolster. Engraving is a time consuming process I'm afraid... The blade length from where the tang meets t
    10 points
  6. Hi, I based on the archaeological find from Gniezo (Poland). It is dated to early-medieval. Blade length is 20 cm. Wolf's teeth have been made "unplugged", I used only basic and historical tools. I used several kind of the materials, mostly scrap.
    10 points
  7. Hi, i finally finished another long time project. Rohirrim spear. It is made of k720 steel and wrought iron. Horse heads are bronze, silver inlayed and they are brazed to the socket. I hope you will like it!
    9 points
  8. My son got this Red Rider when he was a boy. He's been giving his son some highly supervised target time with it. The factory stock was proving to be too long, so I volunteered to make him a short stock for it until he grows in to the big one: I couldn't stop at a slab with eased edges... I had to go presentation grade. A cool project for a snow day.
    9 points
  9. In October 2020 I finished up this gate project with an automatic opening system, lights, the whole shebang. It was nerve racking that I couldn't stage anything before setting it in place. I made sure to measure everything thrice and rig up the anchors so they were in the right spot when the footings were poured. The leaves are made from old boiler pipe sections from an old industrial laundry factory that was in Durham, NC. It's been over 2 years since I last posted to the forum, so this is a long overdue update on what I've been up to. A friction fo
    8 points
  10. Alright, finally managed to get the handle together and finalized the damn thing with a pommel nut today. My 2nd pommel nut ever, and first in pattern welded steel w. gold inlay. So, the handle wood is stabilized maple, with 925 silver and vulcanized fiber spacers. The bolster, pommel and mid-section are forged from railroad steel, engraved in a deep relief with 24k. gold inlay and set with two 0.03ct diamonds, four rubies and four sapphires. The runes of bolster and pommel reads: Hrothlitnir synir Sons of the Famous Wolf Skol ok Hati Skol a
    7 points
  11. Hi everyone, This will be my first attempt at producing a tamahagane blade, so be warned, this may or may not go anywhere I'll be aiming for a modest size tanto to limit my losses in case I completely mess up, since I might just end up making expensive wrought iron instead. The bloom was smelted by Pierluigi Ponzio (IG: katana_kaji_japanesesword) with ore from the Rio Tinto river in southern Spain. Spark testing shows consistent high carbon throughout (1.2-1.5% according to Pierluigi): I am more or less following
    7 points
  12. I etched the end grains of two bars I forged out yesterday. Planning to try my hand at mosaics
    7 points
  13. Forged this last weekend to see if the shop gremlins were still active. Cleaned it up yesterday. Did the HT this morning, and since I unexpectedly had the rest of the day free, went ahead and hafted it. Needs some work on the bevel to blend everything. Mild steel body, file edge with teeth (they'll show up as it ages), curly ash handle. Wood finished natural with boiled linseed oil to bring up the stripes. This is some nice ash, I'll be sad when it's all gone.
    7 points
  14. So I happened to pull out the design drawing and see how much of a curve the edge needed and I noticed that my latest sucess fell drasticly short of the required demensions... Yay for me, I made another one! Outside of a rather forceful hammer blow on the edge that has to stay, it came out fairly well. It is etched and has a handle rough shaped. I do wish there was a little more damascus showing, but at this point that is something I can live with so long as I get this off my bench. My next hair brained idea is to inlay some antler peices into the handle about half way up.
    7 points
  15. My little sister wanted to get the big sis a knife block for Christmas, but couldn't find one in town. She enlisted my equipment operating skills (much to her chagrin) and we put one together ourselves from red oak and black walnut. In this project we discovered neither of us are particularly adept at woodworking. It is fully funtional, not very square or flat, and held together with copious amounts of glue and shear stubborn will power. It was a fun little break from knife orders, though both of us are glad we got it done today.
    7 points
  16. This is my most prized piece to date. I’m just 1 year into physically bladesmithing. I’ve been studying and reading for about 5 years. Minimal tools in my shop, no press or power hammers. A home built 2x72. Critique is welcomed
    6 points
  17. And actually got a commission to make a knife for once. 115crv3 core with a damascus cladding the I made so long ago I have no idea about layers in it The ebony in the grip is just amazing but my phone just really can't pick up the deep colours and tones in it
    6 points
  18. Hi, it‘s been so long that I last made - not to say posted anything knife related. Late last year the bug bit me again and it bit hard. So without any design process it kind of broke out of me… I had a decent bar of an older german tool steel (1.2519), brass and stag at hand so I decided to go for the style of the old Sheffield bowies. The blade is flat ground all the way with approximate half an inch towards the cutting edge worked down to zero on the slack belt to get some more stability. Blade is a hair over eight and a half inches.
    6 points
  19. A little while ago @Jeff Amundsonshared that he used a laser on a pair of scissors he was working on. That kind of got me to thinking. I've always struggled with symmetry on my handles, in part stemming from finding it difficult to establish a true center line after primary shaping. His idea prompted me to use the laser on my chop saw to help draw a center line. I started with roudlghoing out the general profile of the handle. Then lined it up to the laser on my chop saw. And roughed on some marks. Then I played out a rough profile of what I w
    6 points
  20. Early medieval battle axe. I used wrought iron (old 19-century wagon axel) and medium carbon steel (1045). I based on the archaeological find from the Płock area (Poland). The eye is wrap and forge-welded, the cutting edge is symmetrical.
    6 points
  21. I took the day off and spent some time forging. A day's work in four photos. It doesn't look like much, but it sure feels like a lot.
    5 points
  22. I'm not particularly sure what to call this seax, but the goal was to make this a seax that would have been accessible to the normal everyday person. I had a lot of fun and learned a lot from this, hopefully many more to come! Forged from 1065, and I did clay it but less for any real reason and more for practice mixing, applying, and working with a clayed blade. Handle is made out of burn-pile rescue Madrone, so it did have some checking in it, but I'm not too worried and it's not big enough to cause any pinching in the hand. I added a bolster of antler fr
    5 points
  23. So my very first hatchet attempt got seriously reprofiled after I ground down to solid welds. It's pretty but not very correct. I'm not sure if its a mutant hybrid, or if there is a technical name for something that looks like a tomahawk and has a hatchet style poll. I used red oak for the handle and used Don Abbott's iron acetate recipe to dye the stripe. The damascus turned out way cool on this one. I was thinking about keeping it, but I put a picture on my facebook page and have a couple people who want to buy it. I have a hard time selling rejects though, so it will probably end up as
    5 points
  24. I completed the foundation forging: This looks suspiciously clean, and since this is the first time I'm doing this, I figure I'd etch so I'd get a better idea of what I've actually been doing: There are definitely questionable spots here. Good thing there's more folding to do, that should give me plenty of opportunities to add more of them.
    5 points
  25. This one is my drop point hunter with a teardrop style handle. The blade is 8670 carbon steel and 4 3/4” in length. The scales are Mexican cocobolo, with green liners, brass pins, and a brass lanyard hole. Opinions welcome!
    5 points
  26. Hello, i have one chef knife without an owner so i would like to offer it here. The blade is made of K720 which is comparable to US O2 steel. The handle is made of wenge. Lenght of the blade - 18 cm High of the blade - 5,4 cm Lenght of the handle - 12 cm Price - 220 USD and shipping from Czech Republic Thank you
    5 points
  27. Have this one put together just need final sanding/polishing/touché mark. Dang, stout, heavy folder, suppose to be a pocket knife but it’ll pull your pants down! GT
    5 points
  28. The industrial controllers generally allow the operator to adjust the setpoint in "vanilla" PID control (no ramp/soak), but anything beyond that often requires a God-level passcode that allows access to absolutely everything. I have had a knifemaker, with an oven I'd built, call me because he'd hit a wrong button whilst working through a menu and changed the thermocouple type from N to R or S. He was smart enough to recognize that he was getting temperatures in the tempering range when set for the Austenitizing range and called me. I'd made a similar mistake in the past, so quickl
    5 points
  29. My oldest grandson was given an old pair of spurs. His great grandfather on his dad's side used to work with horses and accumulated a lot of tack. These were in a pile in the barn. Leather completely dry-rotted and the rowels were rusted til they wouldn't spin: I cut, punched, and riveted all new leather. Two days soaking in Breaker and a good wire brushing and I got the rowels spinning freely: His new t-shirt: I suppose I should not encourage their obsessions with cowboys and mountain men and such, b
    4 points
  30. Those are quite cool. Gotta ask, what's with the bottom one? Today I sorta finished(will need touch ups) the first chef blade of the pair. I started to machine the bolster but I realized it was too narrow and I'm going to have to start over...no big deal.
    4 points
  31. This is my 4th knife. Thanks to the advice earlier in the build I finally finished my Sgian. Blade is 1084. Bolsters are copper from my great grandfather soldering iron which I blacked (only partially successfully it left a bit of corrosion on the blade and may have another go) and peened the front to hide a multitude of sins. Handle is Australian Blackwood from my childhood property and a brass pin. Stone was found on my favorite stream. Now I have to work out a sheath. Thanks again, advice or hint aprechiated.
    4 points
  32. The epoxy has had enough time to set, so it's time to do the first test run! Pretty much the most reactive food prep I could think of, I now how six tomatoes worth of salsa (no cilantro because it tastes like soap to me) . As advertised, the stainless steel remains unstained. The food release was ok, but I still want better. The grind is convex with a fair amount of asymmetry (no steering that I can tell though). The edge is definitely thin enough, which I used to have a lot of trouble with. I can't remember where I saw it first, but I picked up this method from a video and it has
    4 points
  33. Had some down time this afternoon in between projects. Threw this together as a thank you to the buddy that donated the .30-06 brass for my most recent build. Pretty simple really, but a nice little distraction from flat surfaces and sharp edges.
    4 points
  34. This one has an 8670 carbon steel blade, India rosewood scales, and steel pins. It’s almost ready for it’s sheath.
    4 points
  35. Recently finished this one up for a buddy of mine. Blade is 1/8" thick 1084/15N20 san-mai. Didn't get as much differentiation between the layers as I would have liked , but you can see the transition if you look closely enough. The main handle wood is Walnut that was harvested from an original M1 Garand stock, with African Blackwood and brass fittings. .30-06 shell casing inlaid into the pommel. It's also the first blade that I've ever marked.
    4 points
  36. Great job on All of these,Faye,good for you for persevering,and working your way through the inevitable challenges.Right on. All of the axes above would sooner qualify as "poll-less". That extra mass at the poll is fairly difficult to come by in a folded-type of pre-form. It Was done,but the starting stock would have to be 1" thick minimum,or even better. Alternatively,that mass was added by welding on an extra piece,or in later years by slitting&drifting the eye. It's a very odd idea to use an axe in butchering game in the field. It ruins the me
    4 points
  37. I'm so glad that the forging and grinding are done. Now I'm just having fun.
    4 points
  38. Finished up this Mosaic Chef knife yesterday. I really like how you can see the forging in the pattern. 8.125×2.125 inch blade with a Damascus bolster, g10 and silver spacers and a Spalted Maple handle.
    4 points
  39. Finally got to the knife I glued up Christmas eve. Done with grinder work on to hand sanding today and probably some void filling since it is Spalted maple.
    4 points
  40. Made a stand for my post vise,plan on adding 2 wheels on the back at a later date
    4 points
  41. Sunday I gave myself a couple Christmas presents. I've been wanting to get organized this really helped. A tool cart and small tool box just for knife making drill bits and milling bits.
    4 points
  42. I just recently finished my second Bowie knife. I’m learning more about fit up with hidden tangs and dealing with guards. I used a technique I read on the forums by drilling out the inside of the antler and using the marine putty. I forged a s shaped guard for it but it was not very tight fit so I used brass. It’s 13 inch blade, 150 layer Damascus, with red stag handle. Pictures below are right after fitup without final sharpening.
    4 points
  43. I don't know how familiar you are with PID temperature control generally. I set up PID controllers in my day job: I'm certainly no expert, but I'm not completely clueless. There were a couple of things I didn't fully understand about the process when I built my first HT oven. With the benefit of hindsight, I would have appreciated being told. Pottery kilns tend to provide "Heat-Work" and the important parameter is the average temperature maintained over several hours. The workpieces usually have considerable thermal mass which helps damp out temperature fluctuations.
    4 points
  44. These are some photos, of my first attempt at recreating the essence of the diamond pattern. I say essence because it isn’t an exact replica as the elements don’t exactly replicate the originals. So I suppose a better term would be proof of concept of this pattern type using elements, like my 4 petaled flower, that I had laying around the shop. Four of the photos were of the blade post heat-treat. The last photo is a better look at the pattern after it’s been ground on a bit. I would be curious to hear your thoughts. one last thing I will add, is that this b
    4 points
  45. For a while I’ve wondered if I could make a “dishwasher resistant” knife. A quick look around found advice for how to do it, but didn’t see any actual knives, though I’m sure it’s been done. I decided to get the materials and try it out for myself. I made one knife to test for a few months and one as a gift for someone who isn’t the best at caring for knives. The blades are AEB-L, with a machine finish buffed to a high satin. The handles are paper micarta. At first I thought it was a little funny but I actually like the red. The handles are attached with the only stainless cutle
    3 points
  46. Yesterday I rough ground, quenched and tempered these two knives. This is what I found this morning. Then I finished coating the big HT forge with Mizzou Now to go work on the Dirk pommel cap.........
    3 points
  47. This build is an order, and it will be used to split elk carcasses so a convenient place to hit it with a hammer is nessesary. I prepped another attempt today doing it a little different than the others. Instead of grinding the cheeks while its flat, I wrapped it around the drift and cleaned it up with the grinder and a file. The bit goes all the way to the eye, unintentionally, but I think I'll leave it that way.
    3 points
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