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  1. Abre-latas at Winter Cutlery I just finished up the "Abre-latas" (Portuguese for "can opener") rondel dagger. Full write up and photos linked above. It's been in process for a good while: Brazilian Ebony takes about 6 months to darken with light and oxygen exposure, but this piece ended up a lovely coffee color with golden grain. It's finished in a house made oil and wax blend.
    9 points
  2. Getting back into the swing as they say... here are two of my infamous one piece guards fresh forged in the rough... Miserable humid and dripping wet in the jungles of central Florida today,,,, been waiting for the last 24 hours for my leatherwork to dry... Oh well.. Don't need no suana.... I just gotta walk outside... JP (Call me Sweat-Hog) H
    8 points
  3. Today I had a go at casting the last metal piece I need to complete the Han dynasty bronze dao (which I started many years ago). It's the scabbard mouth piece. These are very thin pieces, so casting that was a challenge, even in the high tin bronze they used back in the day. To do that, I made a soapstone mould, which in my experience allows me to cast thinner particularly when preheated (and inside coated in soot). Both the mould and the core are soapstone. I had two cores, so I could do two castings should the mould survive the first one. It didn't quite, as a piece broke off. But I was able to bind it together for a second go. Unfortunately, both cast were incomplete, missing part of the leg or lip or whatever you call it. Still pretty impressive though, at only 1mm thick. The mould had crumbled further after the second casting, but I'm contemplating piecing it back together and making another core. Or I'll just stick to this one.
    8 points
  4. Just finished these. 80crv2 blades and bog oak scales: let me know what you think...
    7 points
  5. Here is last week's work..Just finished these little guys. I have to admit that this is the most popular knife I make..I sell them faster than I can make them.. 1095 Electrite steel...Various hardwood grips, Burmese Blackwood, East Indian Rosewood, Purpleheart, Coco-Bolo, Kingwood and Brazilian Rosewood on these. Phosphor bronze bolster and pommel plates. Just have to wait for the leather sealant to finish drying and up they go to our website!! JPH
    5 points
  6. I have been rehabbing injuries to R hand and L elbow, so work is progressing slowly. But, I do have one new one to show, just to prove I'm still around. 4 inch 1080 hunter, acid washed and stone tumbled. Textured brass bolster Antler spacer Ironwood handle with some nice jewel tones. I had an even nicer piece of ironwood on it, but I went to drill a hole in it and it split wide open. Don't you just love ironwood? As always, thanks for looking G
    5 points
  7. Here's something I've been working on. I picked up this possibly Craftsman/ Atlas bench top metal lathe for $60.00 with no motor. I've been wanting one just cause. I put a 1 hp sewing machine motor with a vfd on it. I also have a drill chuck coming and handle. I'm learning a lot. I'm going to be up to $210.00 so I feel pretty good about that. There's Girl math already, I'm going to start "Knifemaker math". 8
    5 points
  8. Another one. Engraved 1095, bog oak and silver: Let me know what you think...
    5 points
  9. Haven’t posted in awhile but have been working alot just not finishing anything lol. This is a300 layer twist forged to shape. It’s Turkish walnut with gun blue fittings
    4 points
  10. Could we have a "Lipstick on a Pig" category? I've got a few damascus blades that i was never really happy with for one reason or another. We could take before and after pics, like a makeover.
    4 points
  11. Hi All, My apologies for disappearing for the last couple of years. As is my custom, I got pretty consumed by a couple of other hobbies and haven't made a knife in quite a while. I've been itching to get back into it, but I've also been wholly consumed by my real job for several months and haven't had the energy to go out to the shop. I managed to break that cycle a few evenings over the last couple of weeks and turned this little guy out. The blade is made from a "Micro-mosaic" bar I welded up from 1084 and 15N20 specifically to have a pattern fine enough to work on a folder blade. I did a WIP on that bar on here back in the day if you want to go searching for it. Maybe I should have gone a bit tighter with the pattern as you can't quite see how it repeats. Liners are bronze, with nickel silver bolsters. Scales are jigged bone. The blade rides on a bronze blade bushing adjusted to be 0.0006" (yes, 6 tenths) thicker than the balde to provide snappy action with no blade shake. The back spring is 1075 and heat blued to contrast against the bronze. I'm a bit rusty at this after a couple of years. Made a few goofs, and had to refer to a tutorial I posted on here about how to make slipjoints. I'm pretty happy with it though as all I wanted was a new knife to carry around. Here it is next to my current daily carry knife. It has been in my pocket with my keys and change every day for about 5 years. Still works great although I am starting to see some cracks in the bone scales. It was one of my early slipjoints, and I have since learned to make them a bit slimmer and more compact. The blade on the new one is only about 1/8" shorter, but the overall knife is much slimmer in the pocket. Thanks for indulging me. I'll try to be more active on here from now on.
    4 points
  12. I made a tool this weekend. While investigating how to make the scabbard for this sword, I came across a saya nori, and thought that would be a helpful tool. So I made one. It's ground out of a leafspring, rough cut by angle grinder, and filed to shape. This type of chisel has a crooked hilt, to keep your fingers clear, and a slightly curved lower face, giving a curved cutting edge.
    4 points
  13. Got the last few knives for a festival in August profiled and beveled today! It's the Junction City Scandinavian Festival, and it has primarily focused on 1800's Scandinavian Festival culture (or..what we think we know of that here in Oregon..), but this year they are opening up a "Viking Village" to explore a few (or 9-ish) centuries earlier, AND they finally dropped their ban on selling weapons! I have about ten knives to sell, 6 seaxes and 4 puukkos (some not pictured here), and I'll have some other forged goodies. As a bonus, I got the frame for my Viking tent fit up yesterday, and dip dyed my canvas covering this morning to dry in the heat over the day. Should make for a good booth
    4 points
  14. MB: On these I use caustic soda boiling at 290 F..makes a deep...dark BLACK..very durable cause I let them cook in the soup for at least 45 minutes...an hour if I can... On other stuff i do a nitre blue...GORGEOUS colours but not as durable as the caustic soda...This is in book IV by the way... JP (I am singing the Blues) H
    4 points
  15. Here's another guard I do...kind sexy in a very simple style...this one is iron and will be blued when done..Love the way blued steel looks wioth the wire wrapping... JPH
    4 points
  16. And there it is (go ahead and push play)...
    4 points
  17. So I forged the edge down, ground, heat treated etc. Now for the grooves. The sides are plain iron, it should not be difficult to do. PS. Not the final polish and etch now.
    3 points
  18. https://www.instagram.com/reel/C3lGykZOvMn/?igsh=MTlidzhqcDFuaDV0Yg= (Watch with sound!)
    3 points
  19. Big sandwiches for frankish style seaxes
    3 points
  20. Howdy!! Let me clarify a bit on the zoning.. Depending upon your area..if you get into what they call "agricultural" "Farm" , "Ranch" or "Horse" property you will probably be OK...What to ask when looking is: Is a home occupation permitted where there are NO employees, little to no foot traffic, and it is an artisanal business... Stress the artisan aspect. See what kind of forges will be allowed..I had to switch to gas..no coal due to the air quality..Odd though if I was a hobbyist there would be no restrictions, but since I am not, I get whammed..so LPG is what I use. Also stress that the forge is not very big.. My large one is 1 1/2 cubic feet total volume.. Most "at home" ceramic kilns are much bigger and those are "hobbyist" sizes.. Now some places have restrictions on the type of home business..like no automotive repair or hair dressers/beauty parlours..etc..etc where it will generate an "eyesore" or more "in and out" traffic. Most places have a list of what you can not open..if they do..that will make it easier cause if it is not on the "prohibited" list you are probably OK. Also if they ask about noise... just say it is about as loud as a carpenter's hammering and that you will be inside anyways..Unless you are running a HUGE power hammer you shouldn't have a problem..I run my dainty little 25# LG and the Missus can't hear it in the house and I am 175 feet away in the front yard..my 64 ton press..it just hums,,,no impact..no problem with that one.. Oh also see if there is a horsepower restriction on the size of electric motors you can use...Out here there are none...some places limit you to 5 HP max per motor. Buildings: Some places limit your "shop size" to a certain square footage...My area does not...most places that do usually limit you to a building no larger than the square footage of the residence that is on the property... I have a 1600 Sq Ft building as the main studio with three smaller accessory buildings for storage... I am thinking of putting up a dedicated foundry area but haven't decided as yet. Neighbors can be your best friends or worst problems..that will be addressed as needed.. I live in a jungle and I can't even see mine...but you sound a lot like me..I don't want to bother anyone and I don't want anyone bothering me...Hell's Bells I function check my SMGs and all (Shooting is allowed in my area as long as you have a safe backstop) and no one really cares...Land of the Free down here and all...One of the big reasons we came down here in the end of 2017 I know this is a bit complicated but it is better to deal with this stuff BEFORE you buy than have a nightmare of problems after you do... Just do your research and you will find someplace you all will love for sure.. Hope this helps.. I am attaching some pics of my studio for your enjoyment JPH
    3 points
  21. I used to watch that Longmire show on TV and somebody got murdered every week out there. Seems like a dangerous place. (Joking of course!) Only part of Wyoming I've been to is the Jackson Hole area and Grand Tetons and Yellowstone. Incredibly beautiful and insanely expensive property prices. No idea what the rest of the state is like.
    3 points
  22. Another arrow Julian is thrilled and for a good reason. He is holding a perfectly preserved 1400-year-old arrow in his hands, which we recovered in 2019 near the melting ice in the Jotunheimen Mountains, Norway. The arrow looks like it was lost yesterday! This type of socketed arrowhead is rare among our ice finds. Normally our iron arrowheads have tangs that fit into the front end of the shafts. But there's always an exception to the rule! We have recovered more than 200 arrows from the ice in Innlandet County, with the earliest dating back 6000 years. Most of the arrows are from the Late Iron Age, around 1400-1000 years old. They were lost during reindeer hunting on the ice.
    3 points
  23. Got the furring installed and will hang the drywall next trip out. We also bought a logsplitter and started splitting, barking, and stacking some cordwood.
    3 points
  24. Ever wondered how much steel you lose to the forging process when making Damascus? How much does all that forge scale add up to? This a 192 layer billet for the CuMai Kopis build. YMMV. Started with 16 layers of 1084 and 15n20 in varying thickness from 1/16 to 3/32. Forged it out to approximately 20 in, cut it into 4 pieces each with 16 layers. Forged back out to approximately 18 in, cut it into 3 pieces of 64 layers each. Forged it back out to 16”x2”x3/8” Started with 5lbs 11.9oz and ended up with 3lbs 0.7oz you can see the whole process here. Medusa's Revenge Build Pt 1 https://youtu.be/5NYXlaXZAPQ
    3 points
  25. ""I was hoping you'd chime in! Being the master of bone and all."" Geeze Alan...that makes me sound like I am, a 1980's porn star... JP (Bone Man) H
    3 points
  26. MB: Here ya go...I can't make these fast enough.especially with a PW blade... Alan: I just noticed the smoke..that is kinds neat.. It feels damn good to finally be back making stuff...now i have to tackle all these back orders..working on a batch of sgains roght now...if only that leather would dry... JPH
    3 points
  27. Some more work on the nakiri. Buffallo horn stinks. I could call it done but that copper buttcap is begging for some irogane work. I haven't done any of this in a couple years so that feels like a great excuse to get back into it.
    3 points
  28. Solvang is basically a Danish settlement from what I understand... From Wikipedia: "In 1910, Danish-Americans created the Danish-American Colony Company in San Francisco. Later that year, suitable land was found in the Santa Ynez Valley northwest of Santa Barbara, and in 1911, they acquired and founded Solvang.". Its Scandinavian though, and Norway Denmark and Sweden has always been close, even during those days when we plundered large parts of the known coastline from Norway to the Byzantine empire.
    3 points
  29. With the shop all packed up and everything suddenly changing from the original plan, I am looking at finding something to do with myself during the bursts of downtime for the next couple of months. So I decided to learn a new skill, or expand on my limited skills, however you want to look at it, in carving. There are some great carvers that have graced this forum whose work I greatly admire and would very much like to emulate to some degree. So without hesitation I would like to begin by thanking a few of them for the inspiration along the way. Jake Cleland, Adam Weller, and Petr Floriniak are the top three that come to mind. I hope none of you mind me copying some of your work because I think the best way to learn is by doing what others have done before me. As always, if anyone has any tips, suggestions, or criticisms along the way, don't be shy about speaking up. The last time I went out to New Mexico, I cut up some rock maple into small handle sized pieces to use for practice. I would have gotten some antler, but I gave away all my North American antler (I don't like that stuff) and the other stag antler I own is packed away in a box somewhere. I pulled out the 6x48 sander and went to town at 60 & 120 to take the corners off and smotth them out a bit. Then I finished 4 of them to 220 by hand. I also bought a small set of carving knives as my set of larger ones is also in a box somewhere and I could always use some small ones right? I also bought two of these little battery powered rotary tools and found my box of rotary bits. Now to check my inspiration folder for some pics of stuff I'd like to try. Thanks for following along.
    2 points
  30. My very first forging experience was with a forge very much like this. Horizontal, 2 inches of wool, inside a cage of fence wire, an old hub cap wired onto one end and some bricks to close up the other end. The burner was a piece of pipe stuck in the side with a 1/4" copper line from the gas tank in a hole in the pipe. An old hair dryer provided the air. It glowed like a pumpkin in a dark shop, and it only had one speed, 2 if you count off as a speed. It worked and we didn't die, so it's all good. I think that was the work of Gene Chapman, a mad genius if ever there was one. Geoff
    2 points
  31. Ha! Most of y'all call me out in public! And that's fine, that's how one learns stuff.
    2 points
  32. I'm not done yet, it may take another 15 years Yeah, this is one of the longest waiting projects I have, doing just a little bit of work every once in a while. But the good part is that due to the time passed, I've learned things new things about them along the way, which will make it better once completed. I still miss a lot of information to do it entirely correct, or at least to a level of accuracy which I can do for example European bronze age swords. But I do need to finish it at some point.
    2 points
  33. This project is the sort of thing that always made this forum stand out to me, compared to other blade forums I'd seen. Not that some of those aren't good, but this place attracts the sort of person who'd spend 15 years reproducing an ancient bronze sword, just for the sake of doing it. Very cool.
    2 points
  34. Didnt do anything, but finished that battle ready seax with weird profile yesterday. Just boast with the welding setup.
    2 points
  35. I installed a taper attachment on my lathe last night and got it all finished up and put back together this morning. I had to move a ton of stuff around so I could climb over the machine to drill and tap the mounting holes.
    2 points
  36. Short answer: carbon content and carbide formers. All wootz is crucible steel, not all crucible steel is wootz. Long answer: Wootz/bulad/fulat is/was made from a very high carbon source like cast iron, melted together with certain organic materials. It tends to be 1.5%+ carbon, up to 2%, verging on cast iron, but by virtue of the carbide formers (often cited as vanadium and/or chromium from either the organic materials or the ores) and lengthy time in the furnace, the carbides are deliberately segregated to form a pattern of extremely hard martensite with embedded carbides in a matrix of soft perlite/cementite that holds it all together. Western crucible steel/cast steel as produced from ca. 1760-1900 was made from carburized wrought iron in the form of blister and shear steel, melted in a crucible to remove all slag. Carbon content is rarely over 1.2% (usually much lower), and there are no deliberately added non-iron carbide formers. Any patterning is purely incidental. Don Fogg asked this very question back in the day, and got a much better set of answers here:
    2 points
  37. This blade was also from the second ingot and upon close examination of the blade you may be able to see some patterning that I tried to do. It was a twist on the Kirk Nardeban rose and ladder pattern. I chose to do Xs along the length of the blade. One side it more apparent than the other.
    2 points
  38. Here is the finished knife. Then here is another that I did from the same steel but different ingot. White G10, Purple G10 liners, Gray G10 pins.
    2 points
  39. Lovely set @Gilbert McCann, and very interesting to see work from someone who got into knife making from the culinary side of things! Interesting, I'll have to take a look around, though it will be a while before I make more blades, likely. I've actually been planning a trip for some time this summer to the UK! Shame about the museum of London being closed at the moment, but there are a lot of things I want to see in the British Museum as well. The National Museum in Copenhagen also has a nice collection and I have a list of pieces I want to try and replicate eventually as well as a few in progress. There are a few others locally that friends have recommended as well. I'll also likely be in the Netherlands for a few months next year for research, so I will definitely try and find some places to visit while I'm there.
    2 points
  40. Just finished another folder. The decoration on this one represents my dad's Métis heritage and his career in the army as a master bomb disposal tech. This knife features a tapped screw hole and a screw with a hexagonal hole to tighten it.
    2 points
  41. The surface is ready for the goldwire. I etched with nitric acid Ruggero
    2 points
  42. I messed up the heat treatment on the first screw I made yesterday and the threaded end cracked off. So I made a new screw for my newest folder. Rotary broaches are pretty neat tools.
    2 points
  43. Thanks, Dick. I submitted photos to ABANA's online exhibit called Tools As Art and was lucky to be chosen to be in print, too. I think it should have been called Tools As Art?, because it raises all kinds of questions folks on this forum deal with all the time. I know some of my scissors end up hanging on a wall. I've made some changes to my process. For my first fuller, the first photo from above, I now create a v-shaped fuller. This v-shape gives me a clear target for aiming the intersecting fuller later on. I've also started adding a tiny wave spring under the head of the screw. I did this to create a little more tolerance in the adjustment of the screw when I peen the end, converting it to a rivet. It's made that process more predictable and repeatable for me.
    2 points
  44. I'm going to drywall everything. I also spent almost $6K to gravel the area. This is the full view from the shop roll-up door.
    2 points
  45. The existing shop is all packed up and the new shop isn't ready yet, so I needed something to do (i.e. practice) that won't take a bunch of tools. So, I got a new toy to start carving some wood scraps.
    2 points
  46. Still need to do the final polishing, but the blade is looking better and better. I'm going to cast the scabbard mouthpiece and slide some time in the future. I'll have to start making models/moulds for those. The mouthpiece will be a tricky cast, as they seem to be of very thin metal. I may do it in a soapstone mould, by which I can make the thinnest casts from my experience.
    2 points
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