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  1. Made this for the missus. Maybe 20 inches wide, forged the leafs at each end and then fold and forge weld to the bar. This isn't one of my designs, but I used to sell a lot of leafy hooks at the farmer's markets.
    11 points
  2. Apologies for my spare participation here. The inspiration for the form of this knife is the Japanese kogatana/kozuka. I have long admired the simple form of these knives and the often sublimely beautiful art found on the kozuka handle. My desire to work in iron on the handle led to the idea of forging the iron to the blade, resulting in a one-piece knife with integral handle. Having recently begun collaborating with Nick Anger, I asked him about making a wood-grain (mokume) patterned blade and strategically forging iron to the back in the handle area. Nick’s highly skilled merging of the iron with the steel was impeccable and just what I had hoped for as a canvas for my engraving/inlay. The wrought iron has a lovely natural, earthy grain. The subject of my engraving is a pairing of pine and plum design. The style of engraving for the plum branch and blossoms is called kosuki-bori, practiced by Goto Ichijo (1791-1876) and passed to his student Funada Ikkin (1812-1863). It was mostly used to portray plum branch design. The plum blossoms are inlayed pure silver with rose-gold centers, which have engraved details and punched raised dot stamen-tips. The pine design served as a transition from the patterned blade steel to the iron handle with one small pine branch on the iron and another forward on the steel. The steel and iron both needed specific etch and patina, which were done after all shaping, engraving and polishing was completed. The blade etch was done by Nick with ferric chloride. I did the iron patina with the technique given to me by Toshimasa-sensei as outlined on my website. The shibuichi throat piece was carved in a wood-grain pattern and has 24k gold inlaid lichen. It was patinated with the traditional Japanese niage process. The saya/sheath is made from Wenge wood and was chosen for its pattern and colors harmonious to the iron patina.
    11 points
  3. A while back I posted a piece of the Lady Wife's work, a knitted, very brightly colored, shawl. This is the same pattern, but done in black and grey. We think it looks like damascus. Geoff and Marianne
    10 points
  4. Those that know , know. Last year at the Ashoken seminar Kevin Cashen started a New tradition by donating a knife to raffle off in support of the Saturday night whiskey Tasting/ Memorial I volunteered to continue the tradition and to do this years knife. This is an experimental pattern weld I did for my donation , the steels are 15n20 1080 and 1075, the handle is stabilized Koa and the bolster/ pin are bronze, the edge bard is 150 layer the spine 1075 the rest is mosaic tiles of 1080/15n20. the Idea is a moon lit tree line with a roaring camp fire, the image in my mind, represents some of my fondest memories of the fellowship I have felt attending Ashoken.. There is a more detail build through forth coming on my Pateron but i am happy to answer any question on how i did any of this. I will not be about to make ashoken this year (double booked with a teaching job) but the knife will be there and will be raffled off.. Tim Nue already mentioned how he is looking forward t it being in him kitchen I suspect he will be buying more than a few tickets. MP PXL_20220913_211809783.mp4
    10 points
  5. A couple of months back I was asked to produce a range of simple sgian dubhs for a high end craft shop in Edinburgh. We settled on a very simple basic pattern, to be handled in either plain bog oak, or bog oak with an antler face, with one structural pin and one decorative mosaic pin, and we also discussed a kwaiken inspired style as well. After a month which started with me getting covid, then a ridiculous cold, and then tweaking my neck to the point where I've barely been able to move for the past week, probably caused by trying to work when I was still way too weak, the deadline is fast approaching. I've got the first batch ready for polishing and gluing. I'm pretty pleased with how they're turning out, but we'll have to see how they sell when the place opens in a couple of weeks...
    9 points
  6. I learned how to make this forge right here, on this forum, 20 years ago. Still use it for carbon damascus & blades. Just switch the same burner over to the drum forge for big pieces & stainless billets. Thanks again, Don.
    9 points
  7. Here is the first knife I have finished in quite some time. This is a slip-joint with bronze liners, bone scales, and nickel silver bolsters. The blade is made from a “Micro-mosaic” bar of steel I made a couple of years ago, but hadn’t made a knife from yet. You can see more about the steel here if you are so inclined: Micro-moasic The mainspring is 1075, and heat blued. I like the look of this, and it holds up surprisingly well in the pocket. My own knife still shows it blue color after 2 years of daily carry in the same pocket with my keys. The mechanicals of this knife are of my own design. I believe I have shared it on this forum before, but would be happy to put up the PDF pattern if y’all want. This knife will be my contribution to iron in the hat at the Bowie Memorial event coming up soon. Show up for a chance to win it Bowie Event Info Now for the pics:
    9 points
  8. A little time expensive though
    8 points
  9. Just finished this 1095 / 420 SS San Mai ,with Iron Wood handle and stainless fittings.
    8 points
  10. It's not knife related, but I've been waiting for a couple of months for this kit to arrive I've got the barrel and butt-plate inletting finished. It was 99.5% done as it came. An hour with some Prussian blue and a small chisel, and I had the parts fitting with no gaps. It's going to be a pretty stock
    7 points
  11. Finished my competition cutter for the hammer-in. It's butt-ugly, but the point is functionalism, not beauty. The fit and finish is ghastly, but it had to be done this weekend. 1.5 hours forging and normalizing, 2.5 hours grinding, 3 hours for HT, 1 hour adding guard and handle scales, 3 hours putting the edge on it. All done by eye, no measurements taken except for a length check while forging to make sure it was under 15 inches. 5160 forged from 1" round, bronze guard, walnut scales with steel pins, 400 grit machine finish flats, 120 grit machine finished spine, 200 grit machine finished grip, edge polished to the point that 15 micron film leaves visible scratches that are only removed via stropping with white diamond compound on leather. It's one of those blades that's so sharp the hair pops out of its way before it even touches it, paper shreds cleanly with no tears, and leather parts with zero effort. If I did the HT properly it should do okay provided I do my part. I have no delusions of winning, but as long as it cuts and doesn't chip I'll be happy. I really don't like sculpted handles for cutting. They look great, but I find them limiting. This beast has a half-octagon section with rounded bottom and a slight indent for the little finger just ahead of the bird's-head end. I find this indexes very well. You always know exactly where the edge is, and you can shift your grip in midswing. You may notice in comparing it to the rough-forged pic from two weeks ago that it lost the coffin-handle profile in the grip. The practical reason is that a swelled coffin end like that makes for a hot spot at the heel of your hand during heavy chopping. The embarrassing but true reason is because I forgot it was full tang and not a frame handle, and the guard wouldn't fit over the end. If I ever get hold of more 9260 I might make a pretty one.
    7 points
  12. Forged this guy from 1084 a while back. As forged texture on the ricasso, spalted mango scales, and bronze pins.
    7 points
  13. Just need to do a little final polishing on the bolsters, and sharpen the blade. Then this one will be done.
    7 points
  14. Finally finished up the first batch of Sgians for a high-end craft shop opening in Edinburgh in a couple of weeks. They're getting collected tomorrow, so just in under the wire. 3 1/2" blades of clay hardened 1095, about 7 1/4" o/a. Bog oak and antler handles with copper and mosaic pins. Back seam sheaths covered in lambskin leather. let me know what you think.
    6 points
  15. I have learned that for me, it's best to set a hard cutoff date when prepping for a show. If I don't, then I'm rushing to get one more done, and it's neve my best work. These just slid in under the wire. I've been seeing folks making pocket stone/fiddler/worry stones out of all kinds of materials, micarta and G10 and other stuff. This one is bone and ironwood and a mosaic pin, because I like natural materials best. I think I'm going to more of these, they're quick and I have lots of small scraps of good stuff. It's quite satisfying to do, and I'll have to make one for me, now that this one is done. The boot knife blade is made from an experimental damascus billet I did for a friend. It's 80crv2 and 15n20. There isn't much contrast, it's more like hada than damascus. Handle is ironwood and bone (familiar somehow) with a mosaic accent. The blade is a single side grind and the bone side of the handle is flat to fit against the person. A little different. Geoff
    6 points
  16. Falling down this rabbit hole still
    6 points
  17. Thank you Here's a bit of fancy work with the leaf, handle for a poker
    6 points
  18. Starting to get there! I still need to fix up the threads at the base of that set screw hole for the stop and make the wood handles but then the tool itself is done! I think it would be better to make single sided cutting bits for ergonomics and safety, I plan to make a set for a number of different radii (maybe four) and throw in a blank or two for whatever the recipient might think up!
    6 points
  19. This set away in the morning. I am increasingly favouring the K-tip design chef knife with its depth of blade further out toward the tip. An 8 inch K-tip, a 5 inch general purpose and a His n Her steak knife set in the travel case all in cryo quenched NitroV with ss pins in the Camel bone handles.
    5 points
  20. Just finished up a neat little commission. A small but stout english style baselard, 30cm blade which is a whopping 7,2mm thick at the base and tapers down to 3mm 2cm from the tip. The grip was deeply fullered to bring the balance point about 2cm in front of the grip. And oh this was an incredibly messy glue up with all those pins and six scales The sheath is double layered leather and got a chape from Tod cutler. I still am amazingly bad at estimating how much leather stretches and shrinks so the outer layer end up a bit roomy but with some burnishing and massaging I gathered it around the sticthing to the point it almost looks intentional scribing in some vines Cut and trying out my new gas powered soldering pen to open up the cuts And then a whole bunch of tooling and now I want to make a really big one if course
    5 points
  21. Found something for ITH this weekend.
    5 points
  22. Forged this from 80CRV2 for a friend of mine. He asked if I could leave the forged texture on the flats which I hadn’t done before… I was pretty pleased with how it turned out in the end though. Guard and pin are silicon bronze with a black fiber spacer. Handle is Euro Red Stag. Blade is 9” and the knife has an OAL of around 15 to 15-1/2”
    5 points
  23. It’s done! The pull stroke seems to have less chatter, but the push has more power. You do need to get a bit of a “feel” for the cutting to make it work, just like its less sophisticated predecessor.
    5 points
  24. It’s in the home stretch! I ground four different cutters: 1/2”, 3/8”, 1/4”, and 1/8”. I also made two “blanks” which are just cut to length and have the corners broken on one end. The handles are pretty simple, everything is nice and rounded to accommodate a variety of grips. All that’s left to really do is to put oil on the grips. I want to do some testing of the cutters to make sure they work as intended, and then it should be ready to ship out!
    5 points
  25. Thanks Brian. I'm not sure it lives up to the quality of work other's are putting out this year. Anyways the twist is done. Just need to sand out some defects and then quench.
    5 points
  26. And Kanna Is done! Not the set I had hoped to put up, but I'm happy enough with this guy. If I get a chance to forge between now and the deadline I'll try to get a Sayanomi chisel sorted out, too
    5 points
  27. I have always done a bit in the kitchen and have made our own bread for many years among a few other daily needs. I started a big soup yesterday with the shins and necks from a couple of deer. Started this morning at 4.45am by doing a bread bake and setting it asside to rise in the tins, then striped the meat and removed bones etc from the soup starter before adding the rest of the dry goods and fresh vegetables to make a decent pot. When the soup was cooked and had been given a good few minutes with the stick blender it was set outside to cool for decanting later in the day and when the bread was within an hour of being ready to go in the oven I got a batch of rusk slice ready so that it could go in the oven and be finished in time for the bread to go straight in after it. Soup cooled later in the day so got it all into the (pint) containers for the freezer so that we can have it for sabbath evening meal so my wife does not have to cook and can enjoy the rest. Later when the bread has properly cooled I will slice it all and put into 6 bags in the freezer to keep me going for a few more weeks. Wife has bought bread now to suit her dietry needs.
    5 points
  28. Scabbard core covered in linen. I used waterproof glue for it to help seal the core And then leather sewn on. And a dry fit of the hilt components just to see how it looks and then a lot of little fiddling to get the parts to fit better to each other Making pins for the upper guard. And then a peen block that fits quite snugly inside the pommel cap. I could have made it much thinner but this way someone could still demount and rehilt the blade as it passes down from one chieftain to the next and now that all the parts were finally fitted it was time to finish samding the blade. Appleseeded the edges and sanded it to 800 grit for the etch Vinegar acid works great. First I let it sit for a couple of hours and then scrub all the oxides off with 2500 sandpaper, second soak was about two hours again with scrubbing and the last soak was overnight The vinegar is mild enough that that long soaks don't really eat much into the steel as the oxides build up and slow the etching down. And then going over the whole blade with 2500grit backed with a rubber block And assembly time Thick leather pieces in the vise protect the blade while I peen One of the things I don't really like about pattern welding and specially on big blades like this is how difficult it is to take good pictures of it. and I still find this so interesting, the polished horn looks almost like marble and then when held up against the light you can see the tang, nails and pins going through it And now back to the scabbard. Though the original didn't seem to have any metal fittings I do think it should have some as even though they were rare on the british isles they were common on the continent For the chape I started by making a form And then it was annealing and hammering and annealing some more followed by more hammering
    5 points
  29. Here's how I currently grind scissors. It's based on my understanding of how scissors are supposed to work and the tools available to me in my shop. I do most of my grinding freehand on a 2x72 using both platen and contact wheels. I grind the inside faces flat on the platen. Then I add a hollow grind to those faces with an 8" contact wheel. I use the same wheel to grind the primary and secondary bevels on the outside face. After grinding, I sharpen the edge using diamond stones. The stones are pretty demanding when it comes to flat and straight. I don't grind much before the heat treat. I do grind the blade ends even, the inside faces flat, and I start the primary bevel. I leave the profile grinding for later, because the hollow grind gets difficult if the tips are pointed. I use an electric oven to normalize, austenize, and temper the 1075. I quench in Parks 50. I get very little warpage. After heat treat, all grinding is done to 320 grit, which seems to be fine enough for the rust blue finish I use. I start on the platen to get the inside faces flat. I also grind the cutting edge straight. More on why the edge needs to be straight later. Switching to the 8" wheel, I grind the primary bevel on the outside face. This bevel is mostly for weight reduction and cosmetics. I aim for a thickness under 1/16" at the edge. The hollow on the inside provides clearance for the cutting edges. The hollow extends from the tip to the pivot hole. What remains of the flat face is referred to as the ride line - where the blades contact each other running the length of the cutting edge and wrapping around the pivot hole. This hollow grind is why my scissors have straight edges. My blades have straight edges because I don't know how to grind a curved hollow with the tools in my shop. This is the tooling I designed to help me improve the secondary bevel grind. I borrowed the idea of the guide rod from the sharpening system I use. It is set to grind 35* off 90. Said another way, it's a 55* included angle on the blade. Finally the profile is done. The next steps are to sharpen the edge, make the screw, blue everything, and do the final assembly.
    4 points
  30. I'm not really sure what to call these things, I've seen some other makers doing them, mostly in micarta and other synthetics, but I like natural materials, so I made a mix. Micarta Some sort of G10/fiberglass stuff, In person it's green curly maple, cut offs from a project for a Ukrainian friend from before the invasion Walrus and bark ironwood, wonderful texture Walrus and bloodwood, to hold or hang This came in a bag of ivory scraps, but I think it micarta or Bakelite. It's got a very fine texture of stacked "V" lines These will all be on the table in Salt Lake priced between $20 and $100 Geoff
    4 points
  31. Spent the morning with a can of Ballistol dusting stuff for Show and Tell. Now I'm off to the shop to pack tools and such.
    4 points
  32. I came out of retirement to take a job and save the economy. (yeah….sure!) So I’ve been traveling too much but take it while you can. right? I managed to finish some on and along, just to keep the addiction active. However all are on the fly with little time for extensive planning, so I just wanted to post a few…….. I’ll be at Bowie next weekend and looking forward to meeting everyone, as I am really looking forward to this hammer-in.
    4 points
  33. So I just got my forge this year and haven't had much time to make things but I decided I wanted to try making Damascus for the first time. This is a 1095 Cumai Damascus knife, low layer count at only 5 layers but I am happy with how it turned out for my first attempt at Damascus. Also, the brass finger guard is smelted from 9mm and 357 casings that my wife and I shot at the local gun range.
    4 points
  34. I decided a long time ago that this type of thinking was detrimental to my business and counteractive to my basic philosophy of life. There is absolutely no reason whatsoever that beautiful objects cannot be used for any purpose, when designed to do that purpose. why does my hunting knife have to lack extraordinay aesthetics?
    4 points
  35. I need a final clean up and and edge on these and they can head off to thier new home. NitroV stainless with black cherry pealised polyester
    4 points
  36. Hello everyone! I wanted to share with you a recent process build video of mine - I forged a Gyuto/Santoku hybrid out of 102cr6 steel and paired it with a traditional Japanese scarf joint called Kanawa Tsugi. Making a Kanawa-Tsugi joint on this micro scale is well... somewhat complicated. In western terms the joint translates to a half-blind tenoned, dadoed, and rabbeted scarf joint. The joint is carefully measured and adjusted slightly against traditional ratios/angles in order to compensate for the small scale. It's a joint that is typically used for joining beams together by timber framers in Japan. I've made a few of these knives now and they are all holding up well but with this variation I've opted to stabilize the handle with G-Flex epoxy resin in order to deter any moisture or material degradation. This keeps the handle rigid and allows me to drill the holes for the hidden knife tang without potentially loosening the wedges. I'm happy to answer any question regarding the process. This santoku/gyuto hybrid is forged from 102cr6 steel. It has been normalized three times before receiving a 10 minute soak and quenching in fast quench oil. Following the quench it was tempered at 200 degrees in 2 stages of 2 hours each. I would love to hear your feedback - this is a direction I'll continue to pursue as I hope I'm bringing something unique to the conversation of knife making. Thanks a lot for watching!
    4 points
  37. Little Bird and Trout. Pattern welded blade, Stabilized Malley capped with a brass bolster Total length 18 cm blade 7.5 cm. Executive Approx 366 layer pattern welded blade, the handle is a little unusual it is a piece of a swordfish bill I kept it in the original shape, onside is a bit rounder than the other and each side is a it different in color and the fittings are sterling silver. Total length 19.5 cm, blade 9 cm
    4 points
  38. Getting close to finishing up my contribution for iron in the hat at the Bowie Memorial gathering...
    4 points
  39. "Over the Weekend" my butt BUT!(eh-hehehe...butt..) I did get it Carved! That small crack is very minimal and left-over from the natural checking, it doesn't appear to hamper any functionality, and is actually hard to see in person. I left it because the dai was getting a little thin for my liking and I didn't want to make it so thin it would flex when using it. I have everything functioning, and it took some thicker ribbons out of a pine board and some thinner/wider shavings from a 1/2 oak board. This is from a quick 600grit polish, so I 'm hoping that with some sharpening and stropping it will perform adequately. It is a little wonky to get seated straight, but it CAN be done! lol On to completely flattening the Bottom, chamfering the corners, and cleaning up what I can on the insides! I may just make the deadline for at least a Kanna...
    4 points
  40. Thank you Gary, this feels a bit like a journal sometimes, I’m glad some others are getting something out of it too. I actually got a small hard covered notebook to keep up with this stuff, my various note pads pads and scraps of paper have often met wet, dusty, or charred ends. I’ve been steadily cranking away with the run of material from my previous post, some of the updates are in my Hearth Steel Seaxes thread. Pucks four and five are completely consolidated, with four being about half gone from use in a few seaxes and a funayuki experiment (did not go well, I forgot photos though). Pucks after one heat and three folds. Previous failures have led me to really focus on cleanliness. Lots of brushing and each fold is preceded by a thorough scrub and forging with water to blast off the scale. I’m also getting more used to the press and not popping welds nearly as often. This is the entirety of puck number five combined with a prior wagon tire melt that proved to be well behaved (no hot or cold shortness). I originally got into this to make Japanese blades, which is where this material is going. Sources from two feed stocks combined after six folds, which from what I have found is one of the ways to hada was manipulated in nihonto. Here’s the results. The 12 fold bar weighs 700 g, meaning it should be enough for two tanto with a kobuse construction. The left is the largest piece of puck two at six folds. I left it there because it gives me a few options; combined with more material I could prepare it for a Japanese blade, it could be folded a few times for edge material, or it could be added to pattern welding (though I will probably test all of my wrought and hearth for etch contrast before I do that). Finally, here are a few etched blades. The hearth steel tends to weld to wrought iron very readily and sometimes with carbon diffusion it’s like the cladding gets “transparent” when you grind it close. It gives a lovely ethereal look like the narrow sax balde above. The small seax is my best “warikomi” (I feel it happens a lot that the only word around for stuff like this today is Japanese, though I’m sure there was a name for it elsewhere) with this material. Because both materials have layering and a bit of silica, it’s very hard to pick out the weld line before etching, even though a hamon would pop out immediately at coarse grits. I guess this makes sense as many old nihonto are “hon-sanmai”, which means they have both a hamon and a weld line running along the length of the blade, but only the former shows clearly in the polish (I’m sure connoisseurs can pick out both). Based on metallurgical analysis of contemporary finds, the sax that was given a Japanese polish was likely a composite too, but looks basically like mono-steel with a narrow hamon. The point of that tangent is that with a shallow hardening, layered steel welded to wrought iron, I found I needed to etch frequently to make sure the grind exposed the hearth steel in a similar, and visually pleasing, way on both sides. This is what I have done on my last few blades, with decent results. That’s all for now, thank you for looking!
    4 points
  41. First I fuller vertically to divide the blade from the shank. The tooling is mounted in a treadle hammer. The steel is 1018 CRS, 516" X 5/8". Next I weld the cutting edge - 1075, 5/32" x 5/16". It took me a while to get used to putting the cutting edge on top like this. It looks wrong if you're thinking knives. The weld is blended in and forged back to the original dimensions. This is a combination of hand forging and power hammer. The shank is drawn out square. The horizontal fuller is the tricky one. It provides a thickness target for subsequent forging and grinding. It also provides some clearance in the pivot area. I have to eyeball its location relative to the first fuller. This is on the treadle hammer again. I have to take it slowly, because the little humps sticking out the sides of the bar get real big if I don't correct it often. Next I draw the blades out to uniform thickness. This is done on the flat dies of a power hammer, taking little bites at a time so the blade grows in length but not much in width. There's plenty of hand forging to keep the cutting edge straight. As I approach the final thickness, I focus on flat and straight. It makes for easier grinding. The last forging will be to draw out the shanks and bows.
    3 points
  42. Well, here's the guard.. Not quite finished yet, but almost.. at 73 hours on this guard, I suppose 75% finished: The guard is forged out of a piece of railroad plate (the one between the railroad and the wood), engraved and inlaid with 24k gold, and some copper. Two diamonds, or rubies will be placed on the holes in the middle of the flowers, but I've yet to decide what will look best. I am starting work on the other side (handle side) today I think.
    3 points
  43. Here's the rest of the hot work on these scissors. At this point the shanks and bows can take many different shapes. I've been designing shapes that are usable as-forged, because I don't like the grinding and polishing that's required on the inside surfaces of the bows. This design uses a very long taper, mostly round, that gets wrapped around a mandrel to form the bows, like this post. I use drawing dies on a power hammer as much as I can, but these small pieces go wonky easily, so I spend plenty of time on the anvil. When I'm rounding everything, I have to remind myself it's what I do instead of grinding. Pivot holes are next. I use a laser to help align the blades to the centerline. I drill one side, then transfer punch to drill the second. One hole is tapped, one is reamed. You can see that the blades are different lengths. That's because I forge them to thickness, not length. I align the shoulders of the shanks, not the ends of the blades, before I drill. The shanks are formed. Everything needs a tool. This is the fixture for shaping the bows. The oval mandrel is adjustable left and right. The mandrel is replaceable with a different shape or size. For this design the center of the mandrel is offset 3/4" from the centerline. I use an o/a torch to do the wrap. The laser helps me keep track of the centerline in space. This pair has asymmetric bows. The thumb bow is moved 1/4" closer to the pivot to better match the anatomy of the hand. These are ready for a pickle before grinding.
    3 points
  44. Update: Was at the venue this morning moving equipment, and got a couple of pics. Here's the outdoor portion in front of the main pavilion, taken from the parking area. The demo tent will be right in front of the building with the demonstrator's spot to the left by the tree at the corner of the building. For the indoor demos (engraving, show-and-tell, Bowie lecture) here's inside the main pavilion: And the view off the back porch of said pavilion: Robin says not to get too excited, a family of otters moved in last year and ate all the fish. Oh, and we've added another great demonstrator Saturday: None other than Jason Knight, ABS Mastersmith and sometimes judge on a little-known TV show called Forged in Fire, or something like that...
    3 points
  45. A bit of necromancy here, but I figured I should update this. The link in the first post doesn't work any more, I believe sections which were originally referred to as " Lapska föremål" in that collection are now called "Samisk historia", my best guess being that it was done as Sami is a more respectful name for that group of people, though I don't know the exact details of the change. Here is a link to a new search: https://digitaltmuseum.se/search/?q= Samisk historia knivar&o=0&n=156
    3 points
  46. I decided I needed a knife for the cutting competition, and I sold my last one years ago. So: 1:00 PM 1-inch round 5160. 2:30 PM: A little rough, but I don't have time to make it pretty. This one is pure function. No tools used but hammer and anvil so far. Hammer includes power hammer, treadle hammer, and hand hammer, plus a handled hot cut, but still, this is all forging, no grinding or filing just yet.
    3 points
  47. Never made a buckle before and not entirely sure how exactly the ones from this era are supposed to work Began with a 4mm brass rod, annealed and bent it into a square, silver brazed it and then did some shaping with a small hammer but it ended up looking alright and it works everything oiled up and wrapped in cloth before going in the box. The inspector is making sure the box is up to standards This project led me to spend hours looking for methods and how to do both filigrees and cloisonne, filled my head with ideas for blade patterns and reminded me yet again how nice it would be to have the needed equipment for casting.
    3 points
  48. Here is the fist knife to come out of my new forge. About 14" long, black walnut handle and display stand, bear claw mosaic pin and bear etch. Braided leg strap. New owner is very happy with it.
    3 points
  49. Thank you! I've been trying to post daily on Instagram, I think some folks here might enjoy that #seax is quite popular there these days. It has been a challenge with 0-3 bladesmithing sessions per week, but it does mean I have a lot of pictures and I wanted to make a point of continuing to post here. It's nice to have a place where content more than a day or two old still gets seen by people who might care about it! Anyways, on to the work from the past few days. The left is a knife inspired by iron age finds I saw in the Danish national museum when I went there with my (very patient) partner on a recent vacation. The right is a short Viking Age inspired knife that I intend to handle and sheath with some puukko like features. Both are made from leftover scraps from the narrow sax I made too large because when an archaeologist says a "blade" is 45 cm long, they mean that the blade and tang are 45 cm long together . I started making hearth steel because back in 2020 when I made a tanto for the KITH I wanted to be able to do some different things with the hamon. Now after a bit of dabbling, I have a few blades that really are digging into that style. Both are kobuse with the 12 fold material and anchor chain. At the spine there's a lot of iron, but the steel gets thicker and the iron gets thinner down towards the edge. Here they are at the sunobe stage. In the left picture there is a sheet steel kata with a ~10" blade and the right is a quick test blade I whipped up out of W2 based on a (very beat up) sunobi tanto I bought a few years ago. These have taper in width and thickness, and after the photo I cut a reverse tip into each so the hearth steel flows with the edge and has god steel at the tip. Both are hira zukuri (no ridge on the blade) which made turning the sunobe into a blade pretty straightforward. I did the math for these, and used the weight of my W2 test blade, and I was suspicious at first, but I was able to get adequately sized blanks for two large tanto out of 700 g of hearth steel, which was nice as quite a bit of time went into that material! That's all for now, I may have time to grind and heat treat these tomorrow, or it may be a while yet.
    3 points
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