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  1. Just got this finished 52100 / 420SS San Mai with stainless fittings and a Walrus handle. a
    10 points
  2. Just finished the sheath for this one. 1095, bog oak, red deer antler and copper, let me know what you think...
    10 points
  3. 52100/15N20 stretched crushed W's with curved stainless fittings and Iron Wood handle I have made a lot of knives with Iron Wood and never seen a piece like this.
    9 points
  4. I'm one of those lucky people who got today off, so I had the time to finish this project.I got the tooling a little off, but that's the way she goes sometimes.... I also fell slightly short of the dimensions when compared to the original. Stats: Blade length is 422 mm. OAL 460 mm. Blade width at base is 33 mm. Thickness at spine is 6 mm. Bronze fittings and the handle is walrus ivory and stabilized walnut burl. Gotlandic style sheath with bronze hardware. Sorry about the cheesy back drop, but it's been raining for two days straight and I don't know when I'll be able to get some good pics. For now, it's the cell phone and a terricloth. Here's the package. The handle The blade. Oh yeah. I decided to peen the top of the peen block and erase the visible pin.
    8 points
  5. These are two of my newest kitchen knives. They're both from a batch of five that I forged at the end of 2020. All five for about the same size and shape. These two are the only ones that got a hand finish for the blade. The blades are a little under 6" (152 mm) long and the total lengths are 10.5" and 11" (267 mm, 279 mm). Both handles are maple burl and buffalo horn.
    7 points
  6. New little dagger I just finished up. Kinda a frontiersy flamberge integral.
    7 points
  7. Things keep getting between me and the shop, but I finally got some things done. These need edges and a final once over, and then they are out the door. The steel is 1080, the handles are black locust burl. Even though these blocks are all from the same chunk of tree, there is a ton of variation in them. The petty is pin burl, the slicer is very flamed, the chef and the cleaver are twisty. Thanks for looking Geoff
    7 points
  8. Trying something new. Dovetailed bolsters and scales on a folder. Temporary assembly pins, the scales aren't drilled for the spring tension pin yet. Lots of work left to go, but the bolsters do actually line up. The pic is just a bad angle. Two firsts for me, the dovetailed bolsters and using horn for the scales. So far so good...
    7 points
  9. I've long been on a search for how to recreate historical brass and dovetail pipe tomahawks as the British imported during the North American fur trade but was never really happy with my personal results. Even worked with a foundry to cast my own, but discovered I can modify the modern imported ones into nice reproductions that have proved popular. WIP of my process on my blog post https://www.irontreeforge.com/post/import-trade-tomahawk Here's a couple pictures, two of mine and one original for comparison. Thanks for looking!
    6 points
  10. Tooling done on one side.
    6 points
  11. Yay, I have something to post again! I cast this blade over 15 years ago, when I was still doing living history in Archeon. The blade is based on a find from Monnikenbraak, Netherlands, dating to 1800-1500BC (probably the latter part of that). It's a so-called Wohlde type sword (analog to bronze age rapiers from the UK). The blade was cast in a clay mould. The mould halves were made from a 50/50 mix of clay sand, that was first dried to leather hard and then had the blade carved out. I don't know if this method was used in the bronze age (rather then using wooden models), but it was something I wanted to try out. Both halves were then assembled, and then wrapped with a layer of clay/sand/horse dung mix. The mould was further dried and fired. The casting was done 15 years ago in Archeon, using a bronze age style pit furnace. This is the only sword blade that I cast that way that was sort of decent. Here you can see the cast straight from the mould, with flashing and sprue (at the tip) still attached. I had started finishing it authentically, but I found that the cast was still not good enough to complete it that way. So it ended up in my pile of unfinished casts, where it stayed for 14 years. Last year I decided to start and finish this one, starting out with making the hilt. The slot for the tang was burned into the wood. This took a few attempts until I had a hilt I was happy with. Mostly because the first piece of wood appeared to have a drying crack in it, which I found when I started carving the hilt from it. This was actually great though, since I could split open the failed hilt and see the result of the burning process from the inside. I was quite surprised at how clean the burn was, since there was only a very thin layer of blackened wood on the inside, only a few tenths of a mm deep into the wood. The burning was done with the hilt plate being still below red hot, and the wood quenched in a bucket of water after each burn. The final hilt was made from a piece of hazelwood. The real challenge was lining up the holes in the tang with the hilt and the slot, which I fortunately got right. Having a drill press being able to drill straight and precise holes helps a lot. No idea how they managed that in the bronze age. Well, I have some ideas, but never put it into practice to see if they work. The hilt is fastened not just with the rivets and washers, but also with a resin/charcoal dust/fat mixture. I've found in the past that just rivets aren't enough in this construction, as the slightest play between the rivet and the holes would result in quite significant movement of the blade inside the hilt. And if you look at the originals, the rivets are anything but a tight fit inside the holes. The finished result:
    5 points
  12. Dear fellow bladesmtihs, I am happy to announce upcoming classes in the series Sword Reflections that Zack Jonas is hosting with me as guest tutor. The first class is Messer Madness, 13th - 19th of April 2023 During the weeklong class “Messer Madness” we will travel in time to learn about the faschinating weapon that is the ancestor to both the cutlass and the bowieknife. The ”Messer” (German for “knife”) could vary in size from sturdy but compact Bauernwehr (Farmer´s protection) to medium length lange messer (“long knife”) to the large kriegsmesser (warknife) that was a two handed weapon for war. Being both very practical and supremely efficient weapons, they saw widespread popularity among people from all walks of life, from humble farmers to the highest elites in society, during the 15th and 16th centuries. During the week we will look closely at aspects of design and construction concerning cross section, distal taper and balance as well as the traditional forms of guards with their distinctive “nagel” that served to protect the knuckles. Each attendee will have the option to make a single handed or a hand and half sized messer with a choice of different blade and hilt designs. Each attendee is required to bring a blade blank made to our specifications and ready for heat treat on day one. The second is Scabbard Class, 22nd - 26th of April 2023. On popular demand we will again arrange a five day class about the construction of a medieval wooden-core, fabric-lined, leather-bound scabbard, built for your own sword, dagger or messer. The craft of scabbard making has a lot in common with book binding, from the materials used like texitle, leather and glue to the decorative techniques involving carving and embossing of leather. Various options for belt attachment will be part of the curiculum as will be the manufacture of scabbard chapes. It is a class that is both pleasant and rich in content with long working days. These century old techniques may as easily be applied in the making of scabbards for contemporary custom blades as for period pieces. A well made scabbard can be thing of real beauty that complements and elevates any hand made knife, dagger or sword. Both classes will be held in the workshop of Zack Jonas in Warner, New Hampshire. Please contact Zack via email (zackjonas@gmail.com) for more information and application. These classes tend to be well attended and slots are quickly filled.
    5 points
  13. Hi, i just want to continue in this existing topic. Recently i was trying to carve some reindeer antler, i used some not really good dremel clone and i was following instructions from Arctic fire video with Petr Floriánek. I have to admit it was fun and i really like this craft. I am looking forward to my new rotary tool which has narrower shaft so the manipulation with it should be easier. It should be the face of Durin, the father of dwarves. I plan to patinate the antler when it is finished.
    5 points
  14. It's been a long time since I completed this project but I recently found some photos on how I put together the wolf tooth pattern and put them in a blog post; this also includes a comparison between the original and my first recreation: https://www.provos.org/p/forging-a-pattern-welded-spear/ Here are the photos but take a look at the blog post, too, if you are interested.
    5 points
  15. And done. Yeah, you can see the pin. The first one locked the action and had to be split, cut, and punched out. Makes for a non-recoverable flaw. Then the horn delaminated at the center pin, which shows up as a hazy patch. Those fine scratches on the tang are not visible except via camera. Dunno what's up with that... The dovetailed bolsters did great. but I have learned to respect horn. After affixing the scales with Loctite A330, the humidity changed. The horn shrunk, which warped the scales. That little gap at the butt end will probably shrink in high humidity, but that's what caused issues with the pivot pin. Live and learn! Also found out Horn is too soft to buff with white diamond compound. Leaves it looking muddy. Red rouge is the stuff for this.
    5 points
  16. For some reason I got the urge to try a redo of one of my failed tantos from the past. This one is 12 fold hearth steel, part of a longer term project to make a blade and koshirae that mean something to me. Last night it lived through heat treatment and has a hamon the whole length of the edge which is a huge relief! I don’t have much time to work on this for the next few months, but there will hopefully be more to come!
    5 points
  17. Hey guys, finished this guy up just before the New Year (Hope everyone here had a great holiday season!) This guy has an 11" blade forged from 1095, bronze guard and pin, dyed maple burl handle, and a mustard patina. This was commissioned by a friend of mine at work for 'sticking' pigs at butchering time, and it oughta manage that pretty well lol
    5 points
  18. I finally got around to building myself a disc grinder, I was kind of scared of the electrical wiring as I'd never done something like that before, but it really wasn't hard at all. One horsepower motor with cheap vfd from amazon, I already love it for squaring handle blocks.
    4 points
  19. This the blade with the found pattern. It's really hard to get a picture of it. I think this is part of an experimental billet from several years ago. The steels were 80crv2 and something else with a similar makeup. It's got 2 hours of etch at this point, and there is hardly any depth to it. It's more hada than damascus, Itame or O-Mokume. It does make me wish that I had done a differential HT, but it's way too thin at this point to retry. I've got the handle components pretty well squared away, so it should be done early next week. Geoff
    4 points
  20. I got the main bronze pieces worked out. I screwed up and only bought one piece of 6x12 bronze sheet and there are no more available at my typical suppliers. This is going to be tight. Templates Drilled and decorated I soldered the two top pieces together and dry-fit them to the sheath.
    4 points
  21. Finally back at this one. Time to make the sheath. Now there isn't much to go by in terms of period sheaths, but the blade isn't period at all, so why bother? I'm going to try a Gotlandic style deal. Clamping yesterday. There were a couple more in this at the very end. I had to dig around to find them..... I removed the clamps tonight. It still needs a little dry-time
    4 points
  22. Yesterday a younger and very talented smith came out to my shop to learn the ways of pattern welding. We made him a very nice billet of ladder pattern using the press method, and a small bilet of W's. Here are a few shots of Corey Dunlap making steel. Hot cutting the ladder billet to fold and stack hot. Cleaning the W's in preparation for a stack. The ladder billet coming out of the press.
    4 points
  23. I've been practicing scratching up steel on purpose... I have one of Ron smiths scroll work books and that has helped tremendously with my designs. Shading lines are still hard for me to get my head around though. These are both with a hammer and three different gravers. I bought a used graver max machine and made a couple cuts with it before it started smoking and making an awful noise. Good news is I got a very good deal on it and it came with a lot of other good tools, and I might be able to fix it. Until then, back to the hand tools.
    3 points
  24. I've just restarted on another project that I started 15 years ago, the reproduction of a Han Dynasty ring hilted bronze dao. This is a type of sword that oddly enough gets very little attention, while being historically very significant. These are the earliest single edged long swords in East Asia, making them the ancestors of the later dao and quite likely also the katana. But at the same time, these were also the world's last bronze swords. Nevertheless, information about these swords online remain very sparse, though that may be my language barrier. At least I see very little new info on these swords since researched them 15 years ago. There are two basic types: the thick and heavy variant with multiple fullers, and they very thin, single fullered variant. I am making a reproduction of the heavy variant. The example I'm reproducing can be seen on this page: http://chineseswords2.freewebspace.com/photo6.html Other examples can be found here: http://thomaschen.freewebspace.com/photo.html and https://new.qq.com/rain/a/20221114A05XEC00 and https://www.sothebys.com/en/buy/auction/2021/important-chinese-art-5/an-archaic-gold-inlaid-bronze-sword-dao-han Since the information is very sparse, I have to do quite a bit of estimation/guesswork. I know that one example of such a sword is 93cm in length, so that's what I used. I have no data on thickness, weight etc. From the photo's on the site above, I estimate that the thickness is around 8-9mm. Contemporary steel daos have spines 10mm thick. Since bronze is a bit more dense, that brings it approximately to the same weight, though the fullers reduce the weight of the bronze sword a bit further. Also interesting is that the heavy bronze dao is the first sword to include a habaki (not sure how this is called on Chinese daos). Photos will follow
    3 points
  25. Thank you! That makes sense. I found some videos about cooking whole tails and it seems pretty involved (like burning off the hair) so it would make sense that butchers wouldn't have it. I did find a "whole animal" butcher near me, who I will call tomorrow when her shop is open along with a few processing plants nearby. I did find these chews, but they are advertised as al alternative to rawhide, so I'm not sure if they are skin-on: https://www.sanchoandlola.com/products/new-ox-tail-chews?variant=43103942738141 I don't have any immediate friends or family with cattle, but I will keep asking around. One of my grandfathers was a rancher and my step-grandfather had a farm and raised cattle a long time ago so I may be able to find a contact. Also, by searching in Russian, I was able to find a few relevant videos that show how this process works:
    3 points
  26. First try of feather(by myself).10 layers that were previously stacked 3 times.
    3 points
  27. My hobby equipment often gets usurped for projects at work. We have something going on where we need to cast a prototype manifold in aluminum. I told the young engineer on the project to get some of the 3D printer filament that is intended to be used as investment casting positives. Neither of us had ever used this material before, so I suggested he print off a few trial run parts. Of course he prints off something that he didn't think was castable. I didn't think it was either, but it is shocking what you can get away with in a vacuum machine. I don't know much about setting up sprues, but it still came out pretty ok.
    3 points
  28. Its about 30 min a piece with the soft steel. But I need to upgrade my big wheel to 14". I have toyed with the idea of flat grinds, but hollow would be better. I think I d ground straight edge and back edge without trying to copy the shape and then grind gladius tip by hand like th eone on the picture. Also I switch for grinds to 72X2" machine, its much stiffer. That would give me decent edge options and a tip to open cans. I think I ll use N690. Very decent steel for the money. I need also to keep the costs down. Most veterans in our club have no money.
    3 points
  29. Proof! Converted 1.25" round wrought iron to 1.25" x 5/16" bar and forged the head, forged the rest of the bar to 1.5" x 3/8". Next I'll forge that last bit of round down to 7/8" round or so, after which it'll go on the lather to be turned into the bowl. In a couple of months I may start a WIP thread on it. The intent is for this to go in Iron in the Hat at this year's Bowie Memorial Hammer-in. Much appreciated! If I didn't have a disk grinder with a tilting table I wouldn't have tried the dovetailed bolsters. Most folder makers that do that mill the liners and bolsters from solid 416 stainless using end mills and dovetail cutters. I used the disk grinder to bevel the bolsters prior to soldering on the liners, then used it to put matching bevels on the scales. It's an experience...
    3 points
  30. I think you should work out your design in a mono piece of steel first ….. and then when you are happy with your results use some damascus… on the other hand making damascus is good woodshedding also…. this is a life long pursuit …. failure is a learning experience as you seem to all ready know….. I’ve never made anything that I could not make better the next time….
    3 points
  31. 80CRV2 blade, stabilized buckeye burl, and 416 stainless pins. Handle is on the bigger side by request, but it still is quite comfortable to me either choked up or held normally
    3 points
  32. I don't want to hijack your thread but here is another conceptual view of how this comes together. This illustration simulates a fuller but when you move closer to the right the steel has not been removed and the pattern looks closer to what you have. As Alan mentioned, not enough removal of material, so you end up with the pattern that's right at the surface of the twisted bars.
    3 points
  33. In my continuing quest to master small, single-blade folders, today I learned I'm getting really good at making Factory Seconds. Didn't peen the pivot pin enough while assembling one of my mini Barlows, so the pin is not only visible but tactile. The action is perfect, though...
    3 points
  34. Cleaned up a little and blended the grind lines. Needs a little more work but I think I like it.
    3 points
  35. The broad sax is now finished! It feels surprisingly agile for the width and thickness of the blade, possibly due to the long handle. I think I’ll use end caps on wrapped handles going forward. I also finally settled on a way to make these rivets. These are soldered together from rod and pattern wire. I also forged this kurzsaxe, I want to improve my groove scraping abilities, so this will hopefully have two narrow grooves on each side.
    3 points
  36. Years ago I had planned to make a video to visualize the pattern welding process. It turned out it was too much work and instead I turned it into a blog post with computer animations and concept photos: https://www.provos.org/p/pattern-welding-explained/ If you find any inaccuracies, please let me know and I will correct them! Otherwise, please, let me know what you think!
    2 points
  37. All three were forged from 1084 towards the end of 2020 and were recently finished. The first 2 were finished with fine Scotch Brite. Both handles are from the same piece of dyed and stabilized maple burl. The handles have a pin with my logo inlaid on one side and have been sealed to prevent changes in color or food being absorbed into the wood. Top knife Overall length: 10-1/2" Blade length: 6-1/8" Bottom knife Overall length: 11" Blade length: 6-3/16" The blade of the next knife is just over 5-3/4" long and the handle is 4-5/8" long for a total length of just under 10-1/2". Asking $500 The blade is slightly less than 1/8" thick at the spine and 0.006" thick at the edge. It has a partial forged finish and the other part is have polished to 400 grit. The handle is dyed and stabilized maple burl cut into an irregular octagon that butts up to a buffalo horn bolster hand carved and cut to fit the tang of the knife. Both pieces were polished to 400 grit sand paper before being finished with mineral oil and wax.
    2 points
  38. I had a stomach bug 1st week of my annual leave, basically watched YouTube videos when I wasn't on the loo. The algorithm put one of the Youtube fantasy knife challenge videos on my feed, and that sent me down a rabbit hole. This video specifically inspired me, so I decided this is what I would do instead of the chef's knife I was supposed to....as soom as I felt better. I made several mistakes, most major being I took a lot of the texturing on the spine away when I did the final grind, upside being its a knife, not a glorified axe. Initially I wanted to wrap the bone in canvas (with resin), that didn't work out so I switched to Mohair wool, turned out nice and I believe this gets rid of any worries about the bone cracking. The bone goes into the copper collar right up to the guard, wool micarta builds up the handle to the level of the copper. Guard is basically three pieces of copper soldered together. Every time I use copper I say never again!
    2 points
  39. From the blade itself, the outline of the hilt edge on the blade and the rivet size. I took further information from contemporary bronze hilted swords, such as these from the Dystrup sword hoard:
    2 points
  40. Upgrade on the spanner on the big grinder and leg to support that long arm.
    2 points
  41. Yesterday I had Corey Dunlap back out to finish his W's bar. We took the little cutout and some 1095 powder and he made his first cannister billet. Today I finished up 3 sheaths.
    2 points
  42. As predicted the blade was full of flaws, o ground and etched it any way to look at the finished pattern. mixed results.. I think i may try welding up the last one again with a really thick jacket and a LONG soak MP
    2 points
  43. Once again, I'll take this opportunity to advise folks to get Mark Aspery's first book. it has quite a bit of information and how-to on making and using punches and drifts, including steel section. He also has number of Youtube videos which support the book.
    2 points
  44. Nope. Absorbing on the way up (thus the dark line) giving it up on the way down (bright line). It works for all water-hardening and almost all oil-hardening steels. Once the chromium level gets over around 10% decalescence gets iffy. For things like A2, D2, and all the martensitic stainless steels it can't be relied on, which is just as well since those all require a fairly long soak at critical* to fully redistribute the carbides. But yeah, all the 10XX series, 5160, 52100, and anything that doesn't require a soak longer than a minute or two, it'll work every time. * edited to add: "critical" is different for each alloy, it is NOT when the steel goes nonmagnetic. It is when the crystal structure changes from body-centered cubic to face-centered cubic, allowing carbon to go into solution. For 1095, this is around 1425 F, which is 10-15 degrees above non-magnetic. For 5160, this is around 1550 F, 125 degrees past nonmagnetic. For low-alloy stainless steels like AEB-L, this is around 1925-1950F, about 540 degrees above nonmagnetic, plus you then hold it for ten minutes at that heat to fully dissolve the carbides. Plus it does the crystalline transformation at around 1650, but isn't ready to harden yet because the carbides don't go into solution until the higher temperature, which is why decalescence doesn't work for stainless and high-alloy steels. And AEB-L is an "easy" stainless...
    2 points
  45. A Total Amateur May Have Just Rewritten Human History With Bombshell Discovery (vice.com)
    2 points
  46. I haven't made a sheath in a while, I find it hard to justify the time I spend on them while I have so much projects I still want to do. That said, I do think this knife needs one, I might have to buy some leather and give it a try.
    2 points
  47. Alright - handed over the jewelry, which was well received. Just today I got around to actually photographing the thing with something other than a mobile phone... Anyhow, here's the final outcome. It is interesting to see the 925 sterling silver chain and bail in contrast to the polished 15n20 nickel steel. There's a pretty clear and obvious difference in color. The silver has a much paler color, and brighter shine to it. Anyhow - have a nice rest of the weekend folks!
    2 points
  48. Well, this is sharpened and assembled. Just a few teaser shots before I start on the sheath. Some mid-blade shots of the PW. A close-up of the guard texture. And the pomell. It didn't hide the pin as well as I had hoped.
    2 points
  49. I got the image back from coop , take a look!
    2 points
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