Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/18/2016 in all areas

  1. Up for sale is a short yataghan style blade. The cutting edge is 10" and the OAL is 15.25". Damascus blade and bolsters are made from 15n20 and 1084, mokume spacers are bronze, silver, and copper. MS JD Smith made the mokume. Scales are fossil ivory and each one flairs out to 3/8" thick at the end of the handle. This project is full of curves, there are no flat surfaces to be found. No longer available through Bladesmiths Forum! If you have any questions, feel free to ask :-)
    1 point
  2. Update: SOLD This is a piece built around undulation, from the waves of the twin serpents in the blade steel and sheath, to the bursting stars of the twists and the wavy grain of the maple in the handle. The blade is made with a W1 edge, 1095/15n20 pattern welding, and mild steel in parts of the serpent. The handle is made from curly maple stained to bring out the figure and the sheath is leather with hand textured brass fittings. The front side of the sheath has a serpent tooled onto it to match the steel of the blade. I should mention that on the rear side of the sheath, there is a s
    1 point
  3. So, my recent trip trip to Ashokan made me realize I can't let bladesmithing go by the wayside as I seem to be letting it, and I really miss it. (Not to mention how embarrassing it is to stand around so many makers and have nothing you've made to show and trying to be creative in conversations so you don't betray just exactly how terribly long it has been since you made a knife!) So I figure the best way to get back in is to actually finish any number of blades I have laying around here. This knife is something I treated as an exercise in forging larger blades and experimental heat treatin
    1 point
  4. Recently there has been a lot of love for the seax here on the forum. I can't even say how much I enjoy that, because they are certainly my favorite and most loved sort of knife to create and to see. It is a wonderful thing to see this old object being given new life and being imagined and reimagined by so many talented and hard working smiths. It is a beautiful weapon and tool that grows stronger and more real as each new smith begins to learn the proportions and the tapers that make these objects sing! So I humbly present the recent work I have made and say long live the seax! Fi
    1 point
  5. 1 point
  6. well, you are off and running. These are great knives to make. You can always just pin rear bolsters through the sides like modern knife. That was traditional, too. Or weld on a stub to use, or file away material on the end of the handle to create a stub in the rear or even two stubs to use for peening. Any of these are historically correct. Wrought iron is great, forges wonderfully. The only problem comes when you try to stretch it (like with swaging a guard into place). It can't handle even a third of the stresses that mild steel can take, due to impurities. It will just tear, and ruin
    1 point
  7. Isn't it funny the way the eye appreciates the planned layout in a way that makes one's head turn and eyes pop open? I guess I should have guessed that Peter would have laid this knife out based on set proportions and the circle metric, but it never occurred to me to assume that. I just looked at that knife and said "Wowsa! That looks fantastic." Now, I look at the layout drawing with the circles and a light bulb turns on inside my little pea-brain. Thanks for the arrow! 5:9 Huh. Who would have guessed? I have to remember that. No, I'm over 50. I have to write that down!
    1 point
  8. Digging that blade shape. Looking forward to seeing this one done.
    1 point
  9. It looks like a beautiful blade. Looking forward to seeing the progress!
    1 point
  10. Man you've been creating content at such a rate and style lately that its really inspiring. And your attitude about it is so great too. Its obvious across the internet and especially in person that you're totally doing it just for the joy that it brings and I think that really shows through in the thoughtfulness you put into your work.
    1 point
  11. My first successful attempt at this pattern... Overall length is 12 5/16 inches, handle is maple, fittings are copper, blade is composed of 1080, 1084, 15n20, and 203e.
    1 point
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...