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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/11/2017 in all areas

  1. I am a bow maker who makes osage orange native short bows by hand as I love the physical work. Looks like I feel the same about knives but I need advice as the filing seems even to me like a ton of work. I plan to make a forge with firebricks and a propane torch and with my railway track anvil to start with with 1084,1095 or 01 tool steel. Ok so far? But the next step I need to know, would a belt grinder be required if I forge my knives? Stock removal does not seem like my thing yet and I see a belt grinder would be almost a necessity for that. I plan to heat treat as well with the forge. Lastly as a belt grinder is $$$$$$ is there any other viable substitute fot it in the shorter term ie regular grinder? Thanks
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  3. Thanks guys for the advice. If I only forge my own with say 1084 steel would it be easier than with stock removal to file by hand and avoid machinery all together? I only mention I am a bow maker to explain that I like rustic primative one of a kind outcomes with physical work being the cornerstone. However to not take up space on this site check me out on YouTube under "vfc archery" and subscribe if you wish. Thanks again
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  4. I should have said this in my first post, too. I'm sure you'll find that there are plenty of people on the forum that love bows and archery in general.
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  5. I third the motion on the Angle grinder. Buy a good one, dont buy a cheap one, I made that mistake, I have a PILE of cheapo harbor freight angle grinders in my garage that died for one reason or another, One of these days im going to rip them apart for the copper windings. On the other hand, I also have the 1x30 Belt grinder from Harbor Freight, I think I paid 30 bucks for it, and its still running strong even after 2 years of this, Its not great by any means, but it works. Besides my hammer, its the most used tool in the shop. And belts are fairly cheap for it even if they dont last long. Now lets see some pics of the Bows you make, I have always wanted to try my hand at carving a recurve bow.
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  6. Second what Jerrod said. The small grinders can be useful, but reach thier limits pretty quickly. I've never been dissapointed with my angle grinder though.
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  7. Start with 1080 or 1084 (most forgiving/ easiest to heat treat), and get a few good files. Many makers use just files and sandpaper. An angle grinder is probably the absolute best entry-level tool for speeding things up (on the cheap), as it can be fitted with a cut-off wheel and do a large amount of bulk shaping. Welcome, and have fun. Alternatively, leave now before you really get hooked!
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  8. Here is some videos a fellow on Britishblades posted, on forging japanese woodworker type hammers: Fast forward to aorund 8 minutes to see him make them, but the tool making and dressing at the start was interesting.
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  9. Kevin, the flat graver is one like this: https://www.riogrande.com/Product/GRS-High-Speed-Steel-Quick-Change-Flat-Graver-QC-39/118203 and the knife graver (for the undercuts) is one like this: https://www.riogrande.com/Product/GRS-High-Speed-Steel-Quick-Change-Knife-Graver-QC-K0/118810 Francesco, I just continuously flux too far toward my tong hand. I pre-heat the area I plan to weld (~9" long), add flux there, and the flux melts and sticks like normal. As I'm doing that, I also put flux in the un-welded portion toward my tong hand, so it can pre-heat as I'm welding the first portion. I think of it like this: as soon as the cold portion next to where I'm welding gets hot enough to melt the flux, it already has flux on it. If it's still too cold when I pull it out of the forge to set the weld portion, it didn't need the flux anyway, and it just falls off. Make sense?
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