Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/02/2017 in all areas

  1. Send me an email to bigrockforge(at)gmail.com if you become more serious Brian. As people sign up I can arrange car pooling if it works out. People come up to my place all the time from Indiana and Illinois. Hope you can make it to Shards Collin...
    1 point
  2. Framed bead work. KT
    1 point
  3. You may or may not need a horn, I don't use one much for the kind of work I do. Have a look at this thread https://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=34653, there is some good advice there. There is also this that I posted yesterday All of that being said, lets talk about money . I'm not going to say that there isn't any to be made, but going into it with that as your driving force may not work for you. Let's say that 5k a year is your goal. Is that 5k clear? You would need to sell $500 a month, but what are your overhead costs. The materials are not too expensive
    1 point
  4. Find your nearest scrap yard and buy a good chunk of steel and mount it on a stump or a bucket full of concrete. When starting out, you don't need to have a hardened anvil. If you have welding equipment, you can weld a horn to the side of a steel block if you find a suitable piece at the scrap yard.
    1 point
  5. That twisting thingy is genius! Tons of hand-cranked torque, I love it!
    1 point
  6. Thanks, Alan! The Swiss longsword is finished. This piece is a collaboration between Mike Jia from the Printed Armoury and myself. He supplied the fittings, I did the rest. The fittings are inspired by those often (not exclusively) seen on swords from 15th/16th century Switzerland. Stats: Overall length: 120cm Blade length: 95cm Handle length: 19cm Blade width (at base): 5.5cm Blade width 1“ from tip: 1.2cm COG: 12cm COP: 67cm Weight: 1640g This is an imposing sword, with a wide blade and eye-catching fittings. The type XVIIIa blade combines excellent cutting ability with a deadly point
    1 point
  7. I have not found a balance with home and work...it has taken a long time for me to not BE what I DO. As far as being the "primary" caregiver to my two boys (though my wife may argue about the seven month old) and trying to work, well I am not sure there can be balance. My kids come first..they must. I have passed on work that I knew I could not do because of the lack of time I can spend in the shop...though I would like to do more I can not. Things are odd in that I have had to move the shop this year and have had house issues to deal with so work is very slow to progress and more jobs are pi
    1 point
  8. Well, I'm not sure how to answer....I have been making steel almost as long as I have been smithing..the two seemed to go together....what with the History of Technology pursuit at the University and all. I mean..why would you NOT want to make your own steel??? I guess the more I do or, more importantly, the more old work I see the less confused I become about what is important. The hardness, balance, width and thicknesses all have their place, but at some point you need to come to terms with the fact that a whole lot of people were killed with some really poor weapons. Nobody wants to ma
    1 point
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...