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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/26/2017 in all areas

  1. With the help of Mark Aspery, the editor of Hammer's, I did this article a few years ago. As with all my articles, I've tried to keep it simple and to use only common hand tools. As it's a large PDF file, I'm not uploading it, but instead providing a link to my site. http://www.geraldboggs.com/Tutorials.html
    2 points
  2. Alright, after a lot of various life circumstances keeping me from starting sword # 2 (including my old forge being totally worn out and building a better one) I have finally got the ball rolling again! I am once again working with 1075 from New Jersey Steel. Here is the sunobe (preform) finished yesterday: Hizukuri got off to a bit of a rough start as I haven't forged since January... I finished half the blade then took some rest and went back at it the next day. I finished the rough forging today. Next I will go back over all the surfaces to make sure
    2 points
  3. In another topic I document the progress of a rapier blade, here I will post pics and progress of a hilt that I wanted to make for a long time but did not dare because of the incredible time and effort needed for such a piece. I am no artist and not very artistically talented, so the result will not look like if Cellini or Negroli had made it . However, you have to start at some point... This is the original that it is based on: I will modify it because this is basically a sidesword hilt that doesn't give enough protection in the right spots for rapier fencing. The mods will b
    1 point
  4. Waterjet and then forged 5160 spring steel with integral guard. Autumn leaves and lavender cast into the handle window. Also part of the series is a ram and boar's head, so keep an eye out for those coming up soon Let me know what yall think, Theo
    1 point
  5. The part of this post where you/he says critical for 5160 is 1660* and magnets are not your friend. Does this mean 5160 does NOT become non magnetic in the 1400* range?? Or am I adding 2 and 2 together and coming up with 22. lol
    1 point
  6. Here's some Khopesh inspired fantasy blades. All are just a hair shy of 20 inches overall. The handle materials, from bottom to top, are Yellowheart, Leopardwood, and Curly Bubinga. The blades were heat treated by my friend Lyndle Driggers of J&L Cutlery. The full sunlight really makes these woods come alive...
    1 point
  7. This is my first knife i've made, just finished forging it last night and quickly cleaned up some edges with a belt sander.. Was pretty happy with how level the spine turned out but it does have a slight warp in it i need to take out i noticed while doing a rough grind... Crappy RR steel and not expecting much out of the end product, but i wanted to practice actually making a blade.
    1 point
  8. These three are quite special for me for the people they remind me of. The boner with 4 3/4 in 15N20 blade has scales from a walnut tree I felled on my late fathers yard in the early 80's. The light hunter with 3 5/8 N690 blade has buffalo horn bolsters from a friend in South Africa and end grain olivewood given to me by a retiring knifemaker friend. The field scalpel with 2 3/4 N690 blade has buffalo horn scales from a few horn tip given to me by a friend in the US.
    1 point
  9. Iv been looking for a way to make good charcoal forge as I live out in the bush and I'm finding it hard to keep affording gas. Thank you for this link.
    1 point
  10. Not at all. The material in meteorites is meteoric iron, which is an alloy of nickel and iron. It is not a steel, so lacks the ability to harden that carbon steels have. When it is used by smiths to make knives, it is used in combination with modern steels to produce a pattern welded steel (Damascus). Urban legend and broscience would have you believe that it is some kind of magic material that when combined with unicorn piss and quenched in the blood of a virgin nerd will somehow make an awesome sword. That's just not the case. Modern scientific steel production is an amazi
    1 point
  11. The adjustable rest I built for my grinder is what comes in handy for doing this sort of thing when you need all four sides the same angle. I'll likely set the shoulders of the handle plunges with chainsaw files and then go to that. I'll get to that in a few weeks. Thanks for following.
    1 point
  12. I got into jewelry making a few years ago as a way to flush my brain after making blades. It ended up turning into just another rabbit hole. The outer band is seamless copper/nickel mokume. Also, this was an experiment with making the prongs/outer band all one piece. The liner is argentium.
    1 point
  13. After carving the design, the lines are opened up with a hot scriber. This stiffens the edges of the lines and prepares them for the embossing that comes next, where the background is textured to create a 3D effect and contrast tome the pattern pop. I think it is already possible to see where the decoration is heading. I want to give credit where credit is due: I learned important steps in the making of this kind of embossed decoration from Andreas Petitjean who makes very fine leatherwork and reconstructions for living history enthusiasts. We are both members of the living history grou
    1 point
  14. Starting the sheath isn't the problem for me. Starting is easy, finishing it takes forever........
    1 point
  15. Personally I'd want a bit more of a guard and a bit longer blade for pig-sticking, but I'm a wimp. There is a guy near me who used to guide pig hunts with dogs and knives, and makes the knives to do it. His version has around 8 to 9 inches of blade 2 inches wide, with a true double edged tip for around four inches. He claims that this helps with a quick dispatch of the pig by using a full insertion followed by a rapid up-and-down pumping motion on the handle to sever as many arteries as possible. That rapid drop in blood pressure is what makes it a quick kill. But again, I'm a wimp
    1 point
  16. I've debated on whether to start a new topic for the new sword, but since it is the same project to me, and the discussion is still going, I think I'll just keep it all here for simplicity. Realizing it would be hard to organize photos of forging techniques as I work (take tons of extra time) I decided to just show some things in diagrams. I'm currently on vacation, so I've got lots of free time to do that kind of stuff right now anyway When you forge any single edged blade, you run into the issue of induced curvature due to the expansion of the edge. With knives, we use a preform wit
    1 point
  17. Okay guys, I was staying out of it but I feel the need to chime in since I work with a fair amount of leaf spring. You don't need to normalize or anneal before forging. What's the point? You are taking it up past critical to forge anyway, so all you're doing by normalizing or annealing beforehand is wasting fuel and time. The ideal forging temperature for leaf spring is in the yellow range. Hitting it when it's red just annoys the steel and wears out your elbows. As long as you don't hold it at a nearly white heat for minutes at a time, you won't hurt it. Forging and normalizing will
    1 point
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