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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/09/2017 in all areas

  1. Just finished a single-hand war axe made from wrought iron and 1080. More pictures and information can be found on my webpage: https://crownforge.net/category/news/
    2 points
  2. Thanks Wes! I realize I may go a bit overboard. I should probably take Owen's advice go with "as forged." I do like Owen's "as forged" look...in fact, my main beveling hammer is one of his dog face hammers with a forged finish. Love it. For me, I'm trying to find my own path with the finish and shaping. The only problem (and this is applies to other axe makers) is the customers do not appreciate the work. To most an axe is just an axe. There is little understanding about what goes into these things. Sometimes I spend twice the amount of time forging and shaping an axe head than I do
    2 points
  3. Hey everyone. I'm new here and new to smithing. I've been intrigued with blacksmithing since I was young. I guess with the new show and my all time idol Jesse James bringing the art back to light I decided took look into it.. I've been fabricating and welding off and on at some shops for some time now.. wow first reaction after starting my research. I was excited how relatively easy it is to start. I know from being a mechanic nothing's cheap but a mini forge and a rail road iron I'm getting my feet wet.. plans are to build up better equipment and lead to Damascus. The knif
    1 point
  4. and right there is the "itch" and the "scratch"
    1 point
  5. The endpiece is glued and the handle sanded. [/IMG] Ruggero
    1 point
  6. Yep. Once you let the magic smoke out the motor is finished.
    1 point
  7. I finished my first puukko, and I have been working on a wedged tenon design that allows the knife to be taken apart. This started as a file. The handle is two opposite pieces of a maple crotch. The wedged tenon design works by having an angled groove in the butt plate, and a wedge that is driven in from the lower side of the groove. This way, the surface of the wedge that touches the tang is perpendicular to the tang, keeping the pressure in line with the tang. The scabbard is also my first time wet forming. I have seen some leuku sheaths with a cutout in the sheath, probably for keeping mois
    1 point
  8. Here is a camp knife I just finished. I just ordered 2' of 1080 for #3. Its nothing compared to some of the stuff you guys are putting out. Hopefully I can land a hamon on #3. I suffer from boring handle syndrome....but its comfy in my hand
    1 point
  9. +1 on the wrought. Its great. Where did you get it from and what was the starting size for that stock, if you don't mind me asking. Getting wrought in Australia is like trying to buy hens teeth. Great job on the axe, huge fan!!!
    1 point
  10. Hi Josh. Nice work getting started. Is that an etched pattern I am seeing there? While i have limited to no experience smithing compared to some, if I can offer a piece of advice on the wood working side of the knife. If you support the scales/handle material while drilling with a sacrificial piece of wood it will prevent the blow out you have at the pin holes. Alternatively, drill from the outside - in, if that makes sense? So if you have tear out like that its hard up against the tang and hidden. Good work getting the first one done!!!
    1 point
  11. Really nice axe! And the pattern in wrought looks rich I like it
    1 point
  12. While I have a couple of ball peen hammers and forging work can be done with them, I see that most of the serious "smiths" have a special hammer that is flat on one end and radiused on the other, weighing about 2 1/2 to 3lb so I thought I had better get one as well. At the scrap yard last time I wanted a bit of round stock to make one and the guy asked if an old sledge hammer head would do as they had a few 'out the back'. I found one that was about 4 lb so thought that would be a good base to work from. I needed to shorten it a little to lighten it and after a while of cutting on one en
    1 point
  13. I had built my gas forge and got it running a couple of weeks back but was not getting the heat I thought I should be from it so I rang the regulator supplier and he recomended that I drill out the jst from .7mm up to a 1mm and when I did that it was night and day different so I had a crack at forging a couple things I needed. The first thing was a slag hammer as I had been given a stick welder on permanent loan, so used part of a small jackhammer chisel, cut the top off, forged the chisel end out flatter and made a point on the other end. Some of the videos I saw had them drift a hole throug
    1 point
  14. I use 1/4 inch copper or brass tubing and flare both sides, typically by hand using the peen of a small hammer. Gives it a nice "hand done" look.
    1 point
  15. Jon, take a look at the link Wes provided, https://www.knifegrinderparts.com/collections/small-wheels Anything can be overcome with enough money or the ability to fabricate yourself!! LOL Got to love this obsession. I work in the shop and I say, God when I die please don't let my wife sell my tools for what she thinks I got in them!!!
    1 point
  16. looks good! love the design on the blade. i learned on mystery steel also, now i use 1080 steel, really its pretty cheap for each knife!
    1 point
  17. Honestly, that doesn't surprise me. People have a narrow grasp of what is actually difficult to do and what is not and are easily impressed by flash.
    1 point
  18. I'm a keep it subtle kind of guy, and I am seriously rough on tools, so micarta is perfect. A sub-4" blade for that clip point would move it way up my list for sure. It's sexy, but way too scary to wear while cooking breakfast for the AARP crowd.
    1 point
  19. I wrap it in paper towel with tape, then with a leather caul, then clamp that very hard in the vise. The hammer blows I use to peen with are fairly light and gradual- took me maybe ten minutes of rap rap rapping to establish and then lock down the rivet head, first with domed punches, then with a mostly flat one around the edges in particular. I'm using about a 10 oz. ball pein hammer.
    1 point
  20. Thanks a bunch guys! I appreciate the kind words. Yeah, so the coffee etch... I'd been hearing a lot about it for a couple years. At first I'd been using the boiling water method to set oxides, and that's certainly better than nothing, but my results were at times still disappointing. Then I went to parkerizing after a deep FeCl etch, which really works great but also has its drawbacks. I think parkerizing will remain in my toolbox since it's so effective and I have the setup to do it now, but that 190f temp and the heavy chemical nature of it isn't right for every piece. Plus, it's very
    1 point
  21. I would made it thinner, but I need the mouth of the scabbard to be as wide around as the handle. In order to get the scabbard super thin, the scabbard would have to have an inwards curve, which wouldn't be a bad idea.
    1 point
  22. You certainly are scratching that itch for beautiful clean axes. I love that wrought body, so much character.
    1 point
  23. What I use is a plain rod with a slit lengthwise, through which I can insert a strip of sandpaper. As it it spins, the paper curls around the shaft, in the proper orientation. Of course, it's not something that's precise so it's better for the inside of soft curves such as a finger ring.
    1 point
  24. Good day, my friends!I want to offer some mosaic blades. All blades are hardened(58-60HRC) and polished. Cutting edge is twisted pattern.Steels:1095+O1.Body is made of 15n20+pure nickel+1095 1)125*28*4.5.Price 100$+shipping 2)125*32*4.Price 140$+shipping
    1 point
  25. I knew you had to have a small gnome helping you with all the final detail. Proof at last...
    1 point
  26. Some more has gone into scabbard making for one of the swords of this thread. I added some leather to the top of the scabbard to make a ridge that will keep the belt knot from slipping. This time I choose to simply lay a second layer of leather on top of the existing one. I could have cut away the previous layer, but opted to keep it. The ridge is built up from layers of strips of leather that is glued in place and cut to form. The top layer of leather has its edges skived down and the outline cut so that it pretty closely conforms to the form of the ridge and allows a fold over at the top
    1 point
  27. As always, great work. I don't know what I like more: the inlay, with its almost nervous energy, or that karelian birch burl grip.
    1 point
  28. Thanks @Vinícius Ferreira Arruda. More to learn I have, hmmm, yes....
    1 point
  29. Nice! The hilt inlays especially. And I think we all aspire to reach Barta's level someday...
    1 point
  30. You can order it off of Amazon, believe it or not. https://www.amazon.com/MG-Chemicals-Ferric-Chloride-Liquid/dp/B008UH3SAE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1492289092&sr=8-1&keywords=ferric+chloride Mix this stuff 4:1 with distilled water. Works great. In terms of polish: I go to 220 grit on a random orbit sander (the regular electric kind you get from Lowes or Home Depot). You can get an even etch if it's random. I etch pretty deeply (3-4 soaks at 15-20 minutes, scrubbing oxides off between soaks) then a light buffing with pink scratchless rouge to bring out the contr
    1 point
  31. Let me just be the latest person to echo this picture... man is it easy on the eyes, that spacer between pommel and block is such a nice little touch... I also like the side-on shot of that wheel pommel, showing the taper to the rim, which answered some questions I'd recently had.
    1 point
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