Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/14/2017 in all areas

  1. Hello! I apologize profusely for the novel that is about to come, I promise I won't be offended if you skip to the pictures I recently graduated from Hampshire College in Massachusetts. Instead of Freshman, Sophomore, etc, students are divided into Division I, II, and III. The first year you take a broad set of unrelated classes, and throughout your middle two years you hone in on something interesting you want to study. Your last year, Division III, is spent working on a thesis project that should be the culmination of the last three years of work and study, producing s
    2 points
  2. The Trewhiddle Seax and its sheath are finally complete! This is a knife I've had in the back burner for a while now, working on it nights and weekends. I intended to keep it for myself because I like it so much, but decided to sell it instead. The blade was forged and ground from a wrought iron and 80crv2 San Mai. The bolster is copper that I forged, and filed to shape, and ornamented with geometric designs. The grip was carved from boxwood given to me by Emiliano Carrillo. There were only one or two pieces that were big enough to make handles from, so I am only using them on special knives l
    2 points
  3. That sucks. Good luck. I hope you are able to sort it out.
    1 point
  4. Great work Collin. I am really loving your steel and that sheath. Both are gorgeous!
    1 point
  5. Hey man I've been following your progress and am super excited to see it done! That being said I know exactly the problem, you're having and may have some ideas. Saya were often beaten into the ground in use, and repaired several times during their lives, sometimes being taken apart for cleaning or to be fit to a new sword. When taking it apart was impossible due to the lacquering or whatever finish was on the saya, they would use a saya file, which is literally a rasp on a three foot stick. I'm afraid the historic fix to your problem is literally forging an extra long file. Scratches ge
    1 point
  6. This is the story of a sword. The blade began as a little seed in my mind after reading the book “Swords of the Viking Age” by Ian Pierce. As I turned pages 148 and 149, very much at the end of the book and having already seen many photographs of wonderful pattern-welding, I was stunned by two photographs depicting a sword found in Vehmaa and dating to the 8th century. My first impression looking at the photographs on both pages is that I was looking at two different swords but reading the brief notes I was further shocked in realizing that it was only one. Ever since I saw that blade I wanted
    1 point
  7. Here you can see how subtle the edge pattern is.
    1 point
  8. Too bad as the pattern was for the most part there. The serpent section was not as tight as I wanted but everything else was right on. The next week instead of feeling pity on myself I went back to the shop to make a new set of billets for a third attempt. Although for a day or two I did walk with my head down. Third time’s a charm. I had the sword I wanted with the correct amount of tightness for the serpent and although one of the chevron sections did not have the correct spacing, it was close enough. I was not planning on hilting the blade or making a scabbard but I needed some sort of
    1 point
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...