Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/27/2017 in all areas

  1. Hey guys, here is a recently completed blade I built for Williams Blade Design. This one is a 12" blade, Unokubi Zukuri tanto in CPM 3V. It is based on a traditional, although not extremely common blade style. It is similar to a Kanmuri Otashi style blade, but it leaves more steel to reinforce the tip. Here is a pretty decent chart showing the different styles. James does't typically have tsuba on on his designs, so this one features a low profile turks knot "guard". It's small enough to act as a hand stop, but not so much it makes the profile to thick. Here is the finished blade. Here is James cutting a tanto size tatami mat..... And finally a sword size mat... Needless to say I am quite pleased with the performance.
    3 points
  2. Made this big camp chopper for another friend of mine as thanks for helping me set up my workshop. OA: 21" (53cm), blade 15" (38cm) 1/4" spine (6.4mm) Nablo Spring steel, birch burl handle with steel pins. Treated with dark and light wood stain and linseed oil to bring out the patterns in the wood.
    2 points
  3. So this project started out with some stainless damascus (AEB-L and 304) from Randy Haas of HHH damascus that I won. Being stainless I have not messed with forging it or HT before so with this one I ground out the profile of a couple blades and then sent them to Randy Haas to HT. Here are a few photos of the HT process from Randy: After I got them back I started right away: Here was my sketched out design idea in the beginning: Materials: hard maple, wrought iron, bone, veggie tanned leather, wool, boiled linseed oil, artificial sinew, gules and epoxy... The following photos of my process of creating: After putting everything together I put the handle in some boiled linseed oil and I pulled a small short vacuum to put oil deep into the wood to give it better color and make the grain stand out. f All done:
    2 points
  4. It's alive! Sorry couldn't help myself!! Who knows Frank may just allow you to progress to another before he needs a new neck bolt! I do a lot of metal fabrication work and once I build my KMG clone, I wonder how I ever got by without it!!
    2 points
  5. Hey everyone, just wanted to post a few custom orders I recently finished. First up is a Damascus EDC Neck Knife with a full saya and a tethered mekugi. Furniture is wenge and spalted maple + leather and copper and mosaic pins Next up is an extended blade version of the cleaver, this time with a horizontal leather hip holster. Furniture is a nice cut of cocobolo + copper and mosaic pin. Finally, a damascus friction folder. Blade is a drop point, furniture is walnut with a bubinga spacer and copper pins Thanks for looking! All comments/discussion welcome -Grant
    1 point
  6. This knife was a total pain in the ass to make. Everyone has a knife that fights being made, but this was something else. If I could have done something once, I actually did it at least three times. I had originally wanted to call this knife "The Black and White Tanto" because of the wood. Nope, not anymore. I started feeling like it was cursed. And that is what Norowareta Tanto means... "The Cursed Short Blade". I think this knife is malevolent and hates me. I give it the stank eye from time to time. The steel is Aldo's W2 with a hamon, which of course didn't want to be photogenic. Oh well. The main wood of the tsuka and saya is stabilized Black and White Ebony, with African Blackwood accents. The mekugi is also African Blackwood. The tsuka and saya were made from one continuous piece of wood, which you can see by how the grain of the wood flows. The tsuba is wrought iron that I got from Orien here on the forum. The habaki and seppa are orange peeled copper that I am letting patina naturally. Hope you like it. I think it hates us all. Blade Length (from mune-machi) : 7.25 inches Total Blade Length: 11.25 inches (I think, can't remember the exact length of the nakago) Total Length Sheathed: 13 inches
    1 point
  7. Maybe I'm overthinking it but I got a really cool etch from a piece of 1095 from Aldo. I used 0000 steel wool to clean off the oxides and then used a little Fast Orange hand cleaner followed up by some 4F Pumice. This is after about a half hour into the polish. Notice the cool semi-damascus effect. Why did this happen and how do I repeat it?
    1 point
  8. Hello! Some time ago I have started the project of wolf teeth spearhead that Niels Provos had posted, and I discovered that in the middle of process So firstly, I want to show you ready spearhead, and then photos of process of forging step by step. Please enjoy and comment The spearhead's socket is 21cm long and blade is 45cm long and 7cm wide, socket is forge welded from old iron, blade is made of 50HF spring steel and low carbon S235 steel. Each teeth is welded from separate piece of tooth. Firstly , I drew the project in the 1:1 scale with every dimension: Then I cut the pieces from steel sheet for blades, twist and core. I used S235 and 50HF 2mm steel sheet. Billets ready for welding, 2 on the right are made of 20-layer only 50HF steel, next is made of 16 layer S235/50HF for twist and the last one on the left is made of 26-layer S235/50HF billet for the core. Now after the first welding, everything is ready for cleaning and cutting. The bar for blades was cut in 5 pieces, so after welding it has 100 layers, The billet for twist was cut into 2 pieces and there was added a solid piece of 50HF steel in the middle, and the bar for core was cut into 4 pieces, so after welding it has around 100 layers. the bars are ready and the longest one will be twisted into 4 separate pieces, on the left there is the test piece for socket to check the dimensions that i need for welding. Preparation of core, shorter pieces are made of s235, loger ones of 50HF steel for contrast. The bars for blades are cut into 3 pieces each, so now they will have 300 layers.. Core is ready and 2 billets are made of 2 pieces of twist There are 2 pieces of welded twist and a piece of bar made of old iron After cleaning and cutting I made a billet from old iron,and also I cut the twist and welded it on the core. The twist was welded with core, and old iron plate for socket is ready. I forged the blade bars into square, 2cmx2cm. Now i forge the shape of blades, after that I cut the teeth in it, and from the piece of round bar s235 I forged the bar, grinded it to shape that matches the teeth grooves, cut it into small pieces, placed it into the grooves and welded it to the blade. There you can see all of the pieces that were used for the welded spearhead. On the right there is the mandrel for welding the socket. Teeth welded into the blade bars. All of the pieces for the blade are welded and ready to forge, The plate for socket is cut and cleaned. And this is the blade after welding it into one piece. There is the plate after rolling it on the mandrel. And this is how it looks after welding process. I welded on the swage block, before welding I heated the mandrel up to the orange temperature, and when socket reached welding temperature, I placed the mandrel inside it and welded it on the swage block, after each welding I removed the mandrel, heated up the socket and so on. Then I welded the socket into the rest of the spearhead, grinded it and heat treated. This is how it looks after the heat treating. And ready for etching the spearhead. Regards, Rafał Garbacik.
    1 point
  9. Over the course of a little over a year, I have gone through two bench-top 4 x 36 sanders. I finally had enough and decided an upgrade was in order, and rather quickly (our annual community yard sale is next weekend). So, I got together with a good friend of mine and we worked out some details and he started the build (he had the motor and most of the frame steel). When the machine got to my shop, I had some work to do to get it in running shape. I must say, this machine works better than either I or my friend could imagine. I'm going to try to list what was used: The drive motor is a 1750 RPM 110V furnace blower motor (1/4 HP) and the drive wheel is from a junked push-type snow blower, the two large rollers are old steel casters with rubber tires and grease fittings, the main frame rail is a piece of 6" wide 'C' channel welded to a 3/8" thick vertical plate with two pieces of 2 x 4 rectangular tubing as feet, The power cord is from an old burned up angle grinder, The pedestal and rocker arm for the tensioner is made from scrap pieces of steel with the spring from a junked futon bed. The only out-of-pocket expense was the set of skateboard wheels and bearing for the tensioner roller.
    1 point
  10. Nice @Chris C-S. Let us know how you get on with it.
    1 point
  11. You've gotta love that, recycling at its best! Your only likely problem is being a bit underpowered, but what the hell, sort out the bugs with what you've got and when it burns out or you start to bog it down while grinding just swap it out for a 2hp'ish motor and then it'll eat anything! i love it!
    1 point
  12. That would be quite distinctive Chris and having three sword like demarcations between the letters is a very apropriate addition although you will have to make a sword to justify using them . When I was contemplating having a tool made with just 2 initials in a circle I was quoted in the US$150 range
    1 point
  13. +1 to what @C Craft said. Well done, Kudos.
    1 point
  14. This is a dry fit-up of my Hunting Sword/Confederate Bowie: I hope you enjoyed the trip through the progress on this one. If I still have it at The Central States Hammer-In in six weeks, I'll have Chuck Ward do some professional photos.
    1 point
  15. This is certainly a monster. NICE, i also built my own. A different kind of monster. This has 2hp drive on it, with 5 stage pulleys. I am going to have to re-mount the motor though, on a hinge to act as its own tensioner. The power in this scare the crappers out of me.
    1 point
  16. Wow, you jumped into that one with a plan I see!! Love the whole entire package to watch it come to life by strolling through the pics is amazing. I really love how the sheath finished. You definately knew where you were taking this one too!!
    1 point
  17. Stunning piece of wood on that very capable looking chopper.
    1 point
  18. Great job, that blade is great. I love tantos and you definitely nailed it. The video performace is great to see. Congrats
    1 point
  19. What an outstanding piece! Great job.
    1 point
  20. Congratulations Ben. Nicely done. I wasn't aware Japanese blade designs incorporated fullers (but then there is a lot I don't know).
    1 point
  21. I made this a while back and just got around to posting it. This is my fourth completed knife. I hope you all enjoy. 7.5" 1075 blade with interrupted water quench. Handle is Elk antler shed with coco bolo and copper fittings. Everything was done by hand. Forged then filed to shape. 1500 grit finish. I am not sure what style of knife this is other than kind of a pukka crossed with a tanto. It pretty mucheap organically came together once I made the blade shape. I let the materials inspire me in the forms.
    1 point
  22. Recently I finished a comission knife. Pattern welded balde: one twist approx. 15 layers. Spine of reinforcing steel, cutting edge of 80CrV2 Handle: Brass, elk antler, elm wood + leather spacers and silver pins. The object both for usage and nice looking
    1 point
  23. Hi Philip. Looks great. Always like your works.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...