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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/07/2017 in all areas

  1. Recently a forum member found a block of beryllium copper. Luckily he was smart enough to ask about it before using it, and in the course of the ensuing thread other hazardous things that look innocent enough were mentioned. Another member suggested making a sticky thread about such things, so here it is. Feel free to add your own, after all this may save someone's health if not their life! Beryllium copper, aka beryllium bronze, is sometimes found in junk shops. It is usually marked BeCu, and is most commonly used (at least the way most of us would find it) to make non-sparking tools
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  2. It's been a while since I had anything to post but I have been catching up on my video. Here is the current progress on a broad seax: This has not been a straightforward as I would have liked - future episodes will show me reforging and tapering the nozzle of my forced air propane burner Let me know what you think. Ps: Some of you may also be interested in my Patreon experiment: https://www.patreon.com/nielsprovos
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  3. Hello fellows, Here I will record my efforts to create my first sword. This project started about two years ago when I managed to get a hold of a rather big piece of wootz made by Peter Swarz-Burt of Dragon's Breath Forge in Connecticut. Fun story, as I was in talks with Peter over email to buy some wootz he suddenly dissapeared to Hawaii, so I had to wait for the wootz a bit longer. A few months later I was watching the first season of Forged in Fire and I though "Hey that name looks familiar...". It was Peter!! [spolier] He won, and happily proclaimed that he was gonna take his wif
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  4. Hello fellows, This knife was made for a small girl so it's a little girly. It was her first knife made for 9th birthday present. Mother gave me stones and my niece wanted them to be put into the knife somehow (mini tutorial). Stones are synthetic corundum, so I guess you can call the red one a star ruby and the yellow one a sapphire. But they are not that expensive so I felt I could experiment with them as I had never before inserted stones into metal. No idea why this side didn't get the blue temper color. I tempered in kitchen oven on a piece of tin foil, a
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  5. New to the group and new to knife making. I made my first knife two years ago from a railroad spike and made a few blades here and there but work takes all of my time and I burnt up my forge so I stopped for a while. I fixed my forge and decided it was time to get back into it. I picked up an old hand saw and some tool steel from an estate sale and decided what the hell, lets try forge welding. Here is what I ended up with. Super low layer count, only 19 layers but Being my first time I didnt want to push my luck. I had a chunck of burl...hearts wood I think and figured it looked good fo
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  6. here is a how to vid to show how I go about forging a kitchen knife blade.
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  7. I don't know, I think bringing this wootz to forge welding temperatures would dissolve too much carbides and make it break up even more. I don't remember what the solder was called but it is used for soldering hard saw teeth to a more tough steel body. Here is the tang damage and repair: The 4th side not shown has barely any damage and thats why I kept it so bulky, for support.
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  8. That's a brilliant idea! Sorry if I came across a little satirical (I think thats the adjective I'm after) in my first reply. It's just that I used to not take my safety seriously either and as a result I deteriorated at a rapid rate once I started learing the hard way (Age 12-19). I have done everything dangerouse you could imagine and frankly I'm suprized I'm still here! I broke my back at 17, ran a pocket knife through my hand at 14, flipped a car 4x at 18 trying to drift at 60 mph around a kiss your a$$ turn. No seat belt! (when you make it through something like that, you understand the v
    1 point
  9. Thanks Alan. Din't expect an answer so soon, appreciate your response and the tips. The burners I made have pretty good dampers (threaded discs) so I can dial in a neutral or reducing flame quite easily. I've got a long background in welding dating back to when I was a kid to modern day and I'm 75 now in other words, I know a neutral flame when I see one having made a living a good part of my life as a welder/machinist. (I don't know why I'm getting this dang double space in everything I type but............) There isn't very much information about making your ow
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  10. Magna is my name, I am the spiders bane. This is my take on sting. Based entirely on the carton version of the hobbit that I watched as a kid. It is the blade that inspired me to want to make knives in the first place. I hope I will not bore anyone as this is a wooden model of a blade that I will make in steel. Preferably Damascus once I have gotten a little better at forgewelding. It is a 14" blade and 21" overall. Made of red oak and poplar. Cord and leather wrapped handle. Consider this a proof of concept piece that let me try a few new techniques without wasting a bunch of material
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  11. I study sword and buckler and have a passion for all kinds of shields as well. I started this one at the beginning of the week and this is what has been done so far. These are basswood planks that are about 10mm thick. I cut them down the length to make the edges nice an smooth for gluing. I just used regular old titebond and clamped them together. Here are the planks with my template laid onto them I had originally planned on making a much larger shield but went with this one instead, which is based on a surviving shield that resides in a museum in Marburg,
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  12. I shall remeber that adage Charles! Band-saws has scarred me in the past and I'm therefore afraid of band-saws. Otherwise I lack experience and therefore respect. I need to learn respect without paying the price in blood. Gonna take a look in the shop safety section now.
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  13. Thank you Jan and Alan! I'm also in love with cast iron! Fantastic stuff but dirty to work with. Lots of grind powder, not at all like steel. Part II: Forging, grinding and test etch of the wootz The wootz: Made by Peter Swarz-Burt. Composition roughly 1,5% carbon, 0,5% chromium and 1,3% manganese. Using chromium and manganese as carbide seeds are a little uncommon. Most wootz seem to rely on vanadium for this thing but I think the manganese gives it good hardenability. My strategy for forging was to first make a preform with set distal taper (like I've
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  14. Forged it a while back. finally something worth showing. K600, O1, EN45 174 mm blade, 120 mm handle from camphor burl wood, silver guard Sheath is cow hide with ostrich shin leather.
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  15. Just finished this on up. 3 1/2", 3 bar blade - spine of opposing twisted low contrast PW, silver steel edge. Handle of Red Deer antler, deer bone, and bog oak with copper accents. Sheath is leather and goatskin over copper, with copper fittings and a buffalo horn throat. The main handle motif is a simple knot in sunken relief on the antler and high relief on the bog oak. The bolster is carved with a loop and ring knot. The bone spacer is incised with runes of the recipients names, and the butt plate and rune plate on the box are engraved with a bind rune of their names. The shipping box is ju
    1 point
  16. Thanks for the heads up, i tried reuploading it, is it visible?
    1 point
  17. yes nice! this is so damn creative thanks for posting
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  18. A very nice looking knife overall and I love the way that you carved the peening block. Doug
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  19. didn't have time to get a good shot of the pattern on the finished piece, so here's how it looked before assembly:
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  20. The springs are most likely 5160 if the truck is less than 30 years old, but even then they may be something else. The key here is that whatever it is it has to respond to the same heat treatment recipe as 5160 in such a way as to make a functional leaf spring. This means no matter if they are 5160, 9260, 6150, or 1075 they'll work if you follow the same steps and temperatures. So: forge between around 1900 degrees F down to around 1700 degrees F, or a bright yellow down to medium orange in dim light. This helps prevent cracks. Normalize after forging by bringing it to around 1550 de
    1 point
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