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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/18/2017 in all areas

  1. Hello! Yesterday I started new project - pattern welded pipehawk. It is my second attempt to forge pipehawk. I started with a sketch with dimentions: And then I cut pieces of steel for billet, one were made out of 50HF spring steel and S235 low carbon steel, and second out of 50HF and NCV1, Billets ready for forge welding, the bigger one have 30 layers and 1640 gram of weight, smaller one has 20 layers and 888 grams of weight. Few pictures of forging using power hammer, fluxing and heating up. Billets ready for grinding, cuttin
    2 points
  2. Hey everybody! I've been regrettably absent of late, but not for a lack of productivity. Here is one of the swords I'm working on at the moment, should be finished within the next couple of weeks. I was commissioned to make a sword inspired by this painting from 16th century Italy. By Oakeshott's typology, this is a type XVa longsword. It seemed particularly narrow for its type, so I decided to roll with it. The starting stock. 1" x 3/8" 80crv2, from the one and only New Jersey Steel Baron Drawing in the profile and distal tapers Next, the bevels and tang Taking the surf
    1 point
  3. This was a very pleasant commission to work on for me. I could practice a little more of inlaying and the results got better than i could anticipate, even if I have much to evolve in this art. The blade was mostly done by stock removal, but the tip and the tang were forged prior to the grinding. It was made using 1070 steel. The hilt is of a variation of Petersen's type L and it's components are made in mild steel and the inlays are nickel silver. The twisted wires are also nickel silver. It was then oil coated and lightly heated to make it look darker, so the contrast with the coope
    1 point
  4. A propane forge is a lot better, as it gives a better heat distribution all around, and better temperature control. Best also to add a piece of charcoal in the crucible to get rid of oxygen that might otherwise enter the copper. The copper should probably be fine for reuse. I don't think some iron in it will give much problems, at least not that I'm aware of.
    1 point
  5. Beautiful sword! How did you do the transition from the painting to the blade measurements, cross section progression in particular? Just eyeballing or is it based on an existing sword profile? The narrow shape reminds me of a sword I measured some time ago, which is 35mm wide at the base with an overall weight of below 1kg and a fierce bodkin point:
    1 point
  6. First: I'd advise against this mix. It can be done, and they weld pretty easily, but it's not ideal. You're mixing deep and shallow hardening steels. Consider some 1095 or 10xx instead of the 5160. But, you may know this and are doing this on purpose. Like I said, it works (like a peanut butter and cold turkey sandwich, but jelly is a better option). Second: When welding similar metals together in a double stack, you'll often get a thin line of decarb marking the weld between the identical layers. This effect changes based on the welding environment. Kevin Cashen has done some inter
    1 point
  7. Looking good, nice to see that those dies will have a new life.
    1 point
  8. Just a small update today. So when planning for this knife I knew I wanted to use shibuchi for the guard and but plate (in the same way I did on the Van Helsing Bowie), but with this one being more refined and complicated I decided to try my hand at lost wax. This is my first time carving wax and it really has been fun beginning to learn the process, definitely something I want to do more of in the future. First I made the rough cuts in the wax and roughly fit the tang. I also cut my wax too short on the back part of the guard, but as I learned that is very easy to fix. First th
    1 point
  9. 1 point
  10. Without further ado, this is our Shamp (Shed/Camp). My dad and I built it in 2 weeks.
    1 point
  11. Dear All, After a week of hardcore forging, we managed to get these finished to the point they survived a great deal of incompetent throwing. The same cannot be said for the handles. Let me know what you think. I'll let Sam post his if he wants, or he may replace the handle and then post... and now we wait. James
    1 point
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