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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/27/2018 in all areas

  1. 30" blade, Gaddhjalt type with tea-cosy pommel, blade birds-eye pattern L6/1084 steel. Weight 2.6 lbs.
    2 points
  2. And here's some of the engravings I've done for Roger Bergh and SaraMi Liljeholm. Only done the engraving on the pictures below, the rest is done by the masters mentioned above
    2 points
  3. Some light to Crucible steel pattern. Here seen is raw ingot structure at first, then pre state where some decarb is seen, and pattern from this after foriging and fast grid whit 120 belt in all pics. Ecth is done whit light nital / iron sulfate that is great for chemistry of this steel. And...for notification. This is just one bar of series of last 10 tests of melts,ingots and forgings, also it proofs that my curent reseby and tech produces this watering every time. ...Need to step up to next level pattern development. -N-
    2 points
  4. I started with a 3/8"x1 1/2" piece of 1075. While I set out for a hira zukuri with a false edge; I decided instead to go with the flow.... if your woundering why the blade is taking on so many shapes in the picture; it's because I didn't bend the blade far enough in the wrong direction before I forged the bevels. So, I had to use me shwacker alot. The blade is near halfway done, I'll start draw filing ASAP. Thanks fer lookin'!
    2 points
  5. Today I picked up an anvil for the shop with the trademark Trexton on the side. It's not a company that I was familiar with. It doesn't have an anvil weight on it and my scale doesn't go that high but I'm estimating that it weighs approximately 400 lbs. It's heavy enough that by myself I couldn't right it from a laying down position to upright. Often large anvils this way can be softer than smaller ones but this one has a better rebound than my Hay-Budden. The best part is that I bought it for $.50/lb (with stand). Deals like this don't come along every day. The surface is very flat wi
    1 point
  6. Picture bonanza! Long time no see, haven't been active on any forums lately. And not very active in the workshop either :). But here's a few kitchen knives and a couple of simple hunting knives I've turned out recently. Instead of wasting time talking about them, here's the pictures. Hope you all enjoy em! //DAQ
    1 point
  7. Man, that's a score and a half. Congrats.
    1 point
  8. Wow!!! Damn what a deal, some guys have all the luck! Trentons are about the best forged anvil in my book.
    1 point
  9. Score!!! It's actually a Trenton made by Columbus Iron and Forging of Columbus, Ohio. The central N looks like an X on the ones made between around 1925 - 1950. Nobody is sure why, but it's well documented. Ought to be a serial number on the front foot, and probably some initials. Might be able to tell you not only when it was made, but which smith(s) made it!
    1 point
  10. Hopefully yes, my pal is coming by next weekend to help drill and epoxy the final bolt holes, and I'll wire the motor up, and hopefully we'll get some pattern welding done on it the next day! Video is a promise.
    1 point
  11. I would try a file or something instead of the lawn mower blade or coil spring.
    1 point
  12. That's a dang good price for someone nearby!! Gary I watched a fellow in Dollywood in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. about 20 yrs. ago. I stood and watched him for nearly and hour. I had a great time watching him forge, while the youngins made the wife sick on the Roller Coaster!!! LOL
    1 point
  13. Straight up copied and modified! Blower hunt begins! Set a cut block on the backside. It's not permanently set, but held lightly by the angle iron. I do have some premade refractory cement that I'd like to line the seams. I'm super excited at how easy this was!
    1 point
  14. Hello everyone. New member to the forum here, i figure some backstory is in order. Been making knives a few years now, and i dont plan on stopping anytime soon, the bladesmithing bug has burrowed deep! Lol. Ive been doing metalworking in some form or another for a while now, went to school for welding, but ultimately became a machinist for a major aerospace manufacturer. Ive been studying metallurgy most of my life. Anyway, enough boring talk, onto some good stuff! Lol. A kitchen knife i made a few months back, ~72 layers of O1 and 15N20, all hand welded (no press or power hammer.)
    1 point
  15. Thank you, Zeb! I agree, they look big. But they felt comfortable, and the customers liked them both. I cant ask for anything more.
    1 point
  16. Did you wipe it down with anything after the ferric? Some cleaners can leave a residue, was the oxide layer even before it went into the coffee... left over oxide would slow the etching of the coffee.... I honestly don't know brother. These are just guesses or points to think on. I am FAR from an expert.
    1 point
  17. KONASANDRUM PROCESS AKA DECCANI PROCESS: (1820-1823) from repeated visits and inspection of the process by Voysey. "Native manufacture of Steel in Southern India" - Journal of the asiatic society no.6 june 1832 p 245 [Extracted from the Journals of the late Dr. Voysey] "The granitic clay of the furnace is highly infusible; it is found in the neighbourhood, and is formed of the decomposition of granite rock with small pieces of quartz and felspar, and is so valued for its refractory qualities, that it is exported for the manufacture of crucibles, &c. In making the cruc
    1 point
  18. Josh -- Yeah, I spend a lot of time on airplanes . . . It's for my job. I'm 1/2 time in FL and 1/2 time in AK.
    1 point
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