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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/24/2018 in all areas

  1. Hi All! Haven't been here for some time... I've been learning, and improving skills Here there is a scramasax forged out of 5 bars: 3 x twisted rods (45/68/45 layers) + spine and cutting edge of 80CrV2. The handle is made with bronze spacers, deer antler, pear wood and black leather spacer. The "eye" on the butt is brass riveted and soldered from beneath. Overall len.: 515mm/20,27" Blade len.: 323mm/12,71" Handle len.: 184mm/7,24" Width: at handle: 33,5mm/1,32", at widst point: 35mm/1,38" Thickness: 5,5mm/0,22" Weight: 483g/17oz Let's save the word
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  2. Hi All It has been a while, here are a couple of pieces I made for an exhibition. 1) Deer antler, Gilding metal (tombac) and damascus, total length 28 cm.blade 16 cm 2) Cow horn, Gilding metal, damascus, total length 35 cm, blade 22 cm.
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  3. You sir, most definitely suck Awesome find!
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  4. I am sure forging the triangles would work but it is likely to be an absolute nightmare to get it all fitting right and you likely wouldn't get a perfect undulating serpent. If the organic look is what you're going for then that would likely be ideal as mine is pretty regular. Check out the WIP:
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  5. yes roughly the same time , weather has been great last couple of times...i set the date a year in advance...
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  6. Want to double your money ?
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  7. I have been watching 3 young fellows trying to take this wooden structure down all day and I have come to the conclusion that whoever built this garage contracted out for the Pyramids.
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  8. So we kept going, and here's the summary of our latest attempt/failure (well, kinda). Ore We used the same ore as before. We definitely know it has been used in bloomeries for centuries (more here) and based on our previous experiments, we feel it's appropriate. We did try to make it as iron-rich as possible by "filtering" the roasted ore with a powerful magnet. When crushing it to pieces, it has such a tendency to crumble into powder that we decided to roll with it and pulverize everything. We simply put some water in it before feeding it into the bloomery in order to a
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  9. Well the forge in is finished and a great time was had by all. Thanks for hosting this Owen. It was great to meet several forumites in person and many others blade/blacksmiths, associated crafters and interested parties. I didn’t take as many photos as I wanted but here are some. One of the many demonstrations Dave Roper’s demonstration on Pressblech. My attempt at Pressblech Inside the treasure chest Lacemaker’s Scissors by Grace Horn Items from the Macdonald Armouries presentation Jeff Helmes’ spear forging demo
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  10. I am slowly gearing up for blade show, making some wedge tenon knives, as well as some folders and knives with regular pins. I'm getting a bit better with my leather work. I am making the sheaths so they can be worn on either side horizontally or vertically.
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  11. Bringing back an oldish thread, but I have had the opportunity to do some more work on this knife. It's already for heat treat, gonna clay it for the differential hardness. It's size is 7.5" blade by 1.375" width and about 1/8" thickness with a distal taper. Let me know what you think please!
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  12. Even though I posted these blades in show & tell, I'll post them here because they are the tenon design. The major improvement here was using high carbon steel for the wedges that I then heat treated to a light blue to get maximum toughness/springiness. One problem that has happened with mild steel wedges is that even though I round over the inside of the tang hole, I can only drive it in so far until the tang scrapes on the mild steel wedge and keeps it from going in further. A heat treated wedge gives me the ability to drive the wedge in without scratching any surface. I had to make 2 we
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  13. Thanks! Today I etched the blade and I got some good hamon activity and turnback. I mixed up my own clay, using Dave Friesen's simple recipe of 1:1:1 clay, charcoal powder, and rock dust. It probably would have had more activity if it was quenched in water, but I'm happy with the way it looks.
    1 point
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