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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/26/2018 in all areas

  1. Hello everyone. This is my first post here. I've been making knives full time for seven years. This is my first mosaic damascus, my first multi-bar, and my first kiritsuke. The knife was made from 1095 and 15n20. It has a 9" blade. I used a homebuilt forced air gas forge and a homebuilt power hammer in the construction of this knife. I used a "loaf" method for stacking the different pieces prior to drawing them out to length. I had some input from my buddy Greg Cimms through the process. I have photos of a lot of the process if anyone is interested. Anyway, here is the knife,
    2 points
  2. Hello all! "Bear Claw" foged with hi carbon central layer 1,3C, plus 420 stainless on sides, 80mm long edge. Handle - curly cherry, bronze. Asking 120$, (shipment included). 62-63HRC on central 56-57 HRC on sides.
    1 point
  3. This summer, I set aside the belt grinder, and picked up the air ratchet. I had taken a long look at my 1988 Toyota 4Runner, and realized I had been neglecting my baby. I've kept it up mechanically 100%, but I let the body and paint deteriorate. As the 1st gen 4Runners are becoming more and more collectable, and mine being the best vehicle I've ever owned, I decided to begin restoring her. I went from peeling paint on all body panels, the black shell-top weathered down to bare white fiberglass, banged up front & rear bumpers, and rusted wiper arms and wheels, to what you see below. So
    1 point
  4. I just finished this little knife up. The handle was inspired by Andre Andersson's work, which I've long admired. This was my first go at a handle like this, and I really want to do a mosaic damascus carving knife with this type of handle on it. I think it would look really good. The blade on this knife is a bit simple for the handle I think... but it works.
    1 point
  5. I'll be watching..........................
    1 point
  6. I've been busy working on other knives for some time but finally got around to getting this toothpick to the dry fit-up stage. I had a hard time deciding on what type of guard this one needed. (this is guard #3). The handle is a nice piece of fossil walrus that was originally some type of Inuit pick. After removing both ends it had just enough material for this handle. The fittings are all 416.
    1 point
  7. Thanks guys. Yes,Jeroen,it's tawdally humbling,the old work...In spite(or on top ) of all the rational reasons-their surfeit of manpower(probably very uncommon to forge one-armed);just the sheer Power-helves in the 100's of Kg falling mass,and yes,assuredly the Tradition,the training,following the predecessor... (as well as often being very localised,i.e. working with very familiar to them alloys and combinations thereof;plus the fuel and all that entails). Your bronze pursuits,Jeroen,are Tres humbling...Systematic,consistent,to the point...Frankly,non-ferrous world scares me ev
    1 point
  8. last work with laminated poder steel, or stsinless damascus
    1 point
  9. new lean to roof up, with the aid of my amazing wife. good news is its already survived its first storm 20181013_162954[1].mp4
    1 point
  10. Mark Aspery definitely sets the gold standard in terms of video quality. Craig Trnka is probably the single best resource for learning how to effectively move iron. I'm not a farrier and have no interest in making horse shoes, but this guy is simple amazing. How he can get that steel to move under his hammer is almost miraculous, and to have everything come out so wonderfully clean is something to be seen. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6sRXurRsBs Another good one is Elchschmiede. He doesn't speak english, but I speak blacksmith and can follow along quite nicely.
    1 point
  11. As long as you get the core exposed at the edge, that shouldn't be a problem. If you look at the blade above, the core and wrought layers started out as the same thickness. After filing, there's not that much of the wrought left. And I forge pretty close to final shape. Next time I would make the core significantly thinner compared to the wrought layers. P.s. what helps is to grind a V-edge, at a 90 degree angle or thereabout before forging further. That way as long as you keep that edge line straight, you know you will have steel at the edge.
    1 point
  12. Marten,hi,and thanks. Yes,welding is a challenge,i often wish that it was easier,as it opens up such interesting combinations in work. You sound like a prudent,sensible craftsman,in not wishing to overdo the steepness of the learning curve-and it's a very sound attitude,an asset,to be sure. Some day you'll undertake this,but with thought and preparation,and will be rewarded by good results. There are countless ways to control this process,use decent clean mild still like 1018,likewise a reliable 10xx edge alloy(well matched,those),and other simple expedients. My
    1 point
  13. Good day people, After a long and well deserved vacations “I AM BACK” (Schwarzenegger-like voice in Terminator) I am back to the business and today I bring two you two new folding knives of my recent creations. The first one is a deer stag antler handled folding knife with a straight point and a beautiful cooper incrustation on the blade. This blade of 9 cm length is elegant and functional. The idea behind this folding knife is to break with the curved pattern of almost every Spanish folding knife. The second one is a mini-carraca folding knife, a classic and small foldin
    1 point
  14. One side assimetric axe, midcarbon, 56HRC, black water oak, titanium cap and shift.
    1 point
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