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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/26/2019 in all areas

  1. Rather then claim to know what is fact, I thought I recount my experiences and what I've been taught about linseed oil, tung oil and varnishes. My first experience with linseed oil was my grandfather showing me how he maintained his garden tools. Every Fall, he would coat the metal and wood before he put them away for the winter. He also used it to help prevent rust by coating the bed of his pickup. I don't know if he used raw or boiled, these lessons were before I was ten, and by the time I would have asked, he had passed on. Along with my grandfather's uses, my great uncle fed raw linse
    2 points
  2. I've had the small hunter done for a week or so and just finished up the bow tie ax today. The hunter has a 4" 52100 blade, salvaged steel and wrought iron fittings and a sambar stag handle. 8" overall. The ax has a 1065 head and oak handle.
    2 points
  3. I thought it would be advantageous to have a thread to reference for the benefit of beginners (or anyone under equipt). In this we are only going to look only at our beginner safe steels. Being that I am highly underqualified to direct anyone on metallurgy, correct me at will, and add what you think, or any questions! First up; steel selection . What makes a beginner safe steel? The answer is to keep it simple. A general rule of thumb is the less complex the steel; the less complex heat treatment is (with exceptions). High chromium steels who's carbides require long soak times in
    1 point
  4. Morning guys, here's some pics of this latest hunter off the bench. It's a bit of an unusual one for me. It has an L-3 (52100) blade, 120mm long, 4mm thick on the spine, overall length 255mm, brute de forge finger choil, Macassar ebony scales, inlayed with two bone escutcheons, with red liners held by two S/S Corbies, wet formed deep pouch sheath, dyed golden brown with a Moran style smiling moon in nickel silver.The reason for the Bill Moran theme is the pieces of bone were bought by the client from the shop sale after Bill Moran passed away so these with the forged finger choil and moon were
    1 point
  5. I'm not really a huge fan of Okra myself. But yea that's a lot of chopping right there lol.
    1 point
  6. If you are going to use the saw in a permanently upright position, I would suggest you check the rectangular box that contains the worm gear and make sure there is enough lube.(ask me how I know this)
    1 point
  7. Figured I better check in. We packed up for spring break and headed south. We left 8 foot berms of snow And decided to take on Moab, 2 wheels and 20-40 miles at a time. Now my butt is sore and my hands are shredded, but the 50 degree weather is awesome. No knife work for a bit. See y’all on the flip side. Adam
    1 point
  8. I like the shape of that Kukri, I have been meaning to give one of those a try so I am looking forward to see how yours turns out so I can hopefully get some ideas on how I want to go about my own... And that pocket bowie looks like its off to a great start.
    1 point
  9. This is a common problem for woodworkers. There are a couple ways to solve this. One is using a paste wood filler, like Pore-O-Pac made by Behlen. Here's a link to the Woodcraft page that explains how they are used. https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entries/pore-fillers They are applied before you put on finish, so it's a little late for your current project, but may help you in the future. I haven't personally used them, but they sound like they are what you might be looking for. Another trick, which may help you now, is to apply the oil finish you're using and immediately s
    1 point
  10. That's a hearth melt, not a smelt (since you started with steel and not ore), and that kind of bandsaw blade is more likely to be a 4xxx-series band with HSS teeth. If it's monosteel it's often 1095. The ones that they use 15n20 and L6 for are 9 to 12 inches wide with great big nasty lumbermill teeth. All that said, I think I'd give that a miss next time.
    1 point
  11. I learned very quickly to do 3 normalization’s before the final heat up and quench. I do my heat treating during the day so it’s kind of hard to see the descale happening. But I manage then it’s directly into the oven for temper for me. I use a black and decker toaster oven it works great for smaller blades. I’ve only done the one two hour temper cycle though.
    1 point
  12. Spent the weekend making these. A holding block for a knife out of curly maple and walnut. And a big 12x18 cutting board that’s glueing right now.
    1 point
  13. Hi Charles Thanks for your comments buddy, here are a couple more shots of the knife from underneath, hope they help.
    1 point
  14. I don't put the cutler's rivets in until after the epoxy because unlike a corby bolt, you don't have much room to sand into the head of the rivet. Therefore the surface of the scale has to be pretty close to the final dimension before they go in. I felt the rivets I had in stock were either too small or to large for this handle so I took some of the larger ones, and turned the heads down to 1/4". Then it was just a lot of rasping, filing, and sanding to get the final handle shape. Here is a quick snapshot of the mostly finished knife. I need to do a few touch-ups, and get so
    1 point
  15. Hopefully I can get out of this hospital tomorrow. The pain is going down a little. One bonus is I had a beautiful nurse last night another bonus of forged in fire all day
    1 point
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