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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/12/2019 in all areas

  1. Not exactly blades, but they have edges and points so I thought they might still be of interest. I needed to make a new set of arrows for myself (I am making 24 but these are the first 8) that I didn't mind shooting and that I knew would hold up. I had made arrows before, but never forged my own points and never forged a socket before so this has been valuable practice. The heads are hardened and burned in. The shafts are barrel tapered port orford cedar spined for a 50lb bow, stained and sealed. The nocks were reinforced with ebony wedges. Turkey feather fletching with artificial sinew s
    3 points
  2. Finally finished my kitchen things.
    3 points
  3. I wanted to share some photos from a recent hearth steel experiment we ran. The setup replicated how Emiliano has been producing hearth steel. Our protocol may have been slightly different: Input: Mild Steel (1in x 1/2in x 5/16in) and charcoal (1in pieces) 7 charges (150g mild steel + 400g charcoal). 1 charge every 4 minutes. One additional charge of 400g charcoal. Output: ~950g of high carbon stuff Here are some pictures of the setup: 7 Firebricks standing up; 1in tyuere at roughly 3/4 the height of a firebrick angled slightly downward.
    1 point
  4. Recently I cut some beams with a chainsaw for a small cabin I am building but I didn't like the saw marks on the beams. So to make the beams look hand-hewn, I figured I would make a small adze to get rid of the saw marks. This is my first adze and, for me, it was a lot more difficult than making a small hatchet. I drifted and shaped the body out of 1" x 3/4" mild and then added a 1075 steel bit to the underside. Not having a notch to insert the bit like in axe, I just placed it on the underside of the mild body. I didn't tack weld it down since I wanted to get the body close to temp and th
    1 point
  5. Steve is in American Samoa, which makes a bit of a difference.
    1 point
  6. I think we're on the same sheet of music. I just lay the HC on top and hold it steady. This is one of the few times I flux inside the fire, too hard to get it out and back in without shifting the HC.
    1 point
  7. Here it is! I was finally able to get pictures.
    1 point
  8. Realized none of the images really showed the nock reinforcement which was a fun first for me as well
    1 point
  9. Thanks guys! @Conner Michaux - it doesn't seem like its ever going to be done, but I am seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. Just a few more finishing touches. Quick Sheath WIP. The leather is "half tan" both surfaces are finished (basically veg tanned from what I've experienced) but the middle layer is left raw, and thus it works a lot like raw hide. It is hard when you get it, I try to soak it at least overnight and then it becomes workable. I cut it dry, and only soak what I need. Then I skive the edges to get more of a taper on the ends of the sheath.
    1 point
  10. Don't know how I missed this one - all are great but I really like the one with the copper inlay! Well done!
    1 point
  11. Gorgeous Brian! I've really enjoyed watching this one come together.
    1 point
  12. If the grit is rust, it's a smelt. If not, it's a grappage/orishigane melt. Put the tuyere at around 10 inches to one foot off the floor.
    1 point
  13. Nice, I have a few British and german anvils with gates. I found that hot forging worked well for making tooling fit the slot and for making wedges that fit perfectly. basically heat the bottom of the tooling and sledge it down into the slot . the heat the wedge and upset it to fit the gap. You will have fun with that anvil.
    1 point
  14. Success! Sold all the knives. My first knife sale. Made about 50 percent profit on them (does this mean I am a blade smith now?). Anywho, thanks for the help with patinas!
    1 point
  15. 1 point
  16. I’ve been watching this thread ever since it started, these knives are awesome! I keep thinking there done, but more and more keeps happening to them, so they keep getting better and better. Great work!
    1 point
  17. Reminds me of the case knives trapper. Looking good! This reminds me, I still need to decide if I’m going to do a fixed or a folder for KITH.
    1 point
  18. My goodness, you are doing a jam up job with this Brian, my hats off to you!! I did a slip joint a few years ago, also saved S. Culver’s instructions via web but haven’t gone back to try another. Great job! Gary LT
    1 point
  19. Yes sir, at that weight it should really move the steel for you, as I said. It should be great for using hardy tools too. Doug
    1 point
  20. Then I spent some time filing and sanding the bolsters and scales to shape. I've got a little more shaping to do, but I've sanded through the side of my thumb, and got tired of bleeding all over the knife. This is where I'll stop for the night.
    1 point
  21. The size of the knife you are forging can make a big difference to how you feel about it, and approach the work. Lots of practical knives are 3" blades, yet many people assume if you are forging a knife it needs to be massive. Try starting a forging session with a 1/2" dia bar (or even easier a bit of 1/4" thick x 3/4" flat bar), and the idea to make 3 or 4 stick tang blades. If 1/2 get scrapped in the learning you will still have something to show for it at the end of the day you can feel proud of, and finish into a knife. Not just a pile of frustration. Repeat this exercise a
    1 point
  22. Just saw these. What a great set of axes! There seems to be a resurgence of axe-making going on around here. Hmmm.....time to join the fray I guess.
    1 point
  23. I can't work Paint drawings worth a darn, but here is my poor attempt at tweaking the design.
    1 point
  24. I'm going to quote myself from another post, just because I'm pleased with the way I said this: I have to agree with everything Joel said, but I'd charge more. Do break a test piece and look at your grain. I just taught a "knifemaking (mostly) unplugged" class for my local guild in which I taught the decalescence method and the benefits of normalizing/thermal cycling. First I put my muffle pipe in the forge and let it warm up to what looked like a nice orange color, then asked them what temperature they thought they were seeing based on the common charts. Everyone agreed it look
    1 point
  25. I have seen that trick referred to more than once and will certainly do it for this build. Might even get back a little machinist mentality. My own went out the window during my first smithing class. We were making tongs and I was trying to get a precision fit by filing the bosses flat. The instructor (Charlie Orlando, RIP) took a look, said "let me show you something," and gave it one hard whack with a hammer, problem solved. I know that doesn't work with folders, of course.
    1 point
  26. Driving down a 2 track road that borders my buddys property on one side and state land on the other i came accross this stump that happened to be the right hight for my cutlers anvil. Im still not sure about using this anvil. I have been giving it light coats of wd40 and its getting a nice dark patina. The wife wasnt very happy but it ended up in her suburban. I tried to get all the ants off....
    1 point
  27. 1 point
  28. The face is remarkably flat. And it stands proudly.
    1 point
  29. There is a name either stamped in it ir chiseled into it. Here is a couple closer pictures.
    1 point
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