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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/01/2019 in all areas

  1. Time for another project. The blade is a simple hexagonal/diamond rapier blade and almost finished: The hilt, however, is going to be one of the most time-consuming and elaborate designs that can be found on a sword like this. There have been only few cutlers who did this design, mostly in France and northern Italy. I am going for a hybrid between these two: The chains on the sides of the bars are the most intimitating part. Here are some pieces to test the process of making them (with a rough finish and the cutouts for the "scrolled face" begun): How would you
    3 points
  2. Found this 1904 video and thought I'd share. I believe this to be the 150-ton double-frame steam hammer Westinghouse used in the 1880-1930 period. Watch the guys with the fullers, and the guys who sweep the scale off the anvil with flaming brooms...
    1 point
  3. Back from a week at the Appalachian Center for Craft, a campus of Tennessee Tech University, where I taught a week class titled The Hand Forged Axe. Nice place, great sleeping quarters, staff was actively helpful. Photo of the shop and a sample of the axes I demonstrated.
    1 point
  4. Looks great! Do the glassblowers still get annoyed when the power hammer shakes their stuff off the shelves next door?
    1 point
  5. I think that it's the Bird's Head heal that is giving you the problem. On a full size handle the pinkie wants to nestle in the bird's head. On a 3-finger, the ring finger does this. Your handle is probably too short for 4-fingers (causing the cramped feeling) and too long for 3 fingers (makes it feel sloppy and loose). Most of the little ones I see have a handle shaped more like an arch or a long oval or a wedge. As for the one with the guard, I agree with the modification to the guard and heel that Steve posted. A small knife gets a small guard. Cleaning game is messy work and for safety sa
    1 point
  6. 3 1/2" blade and 3 1/2" handle area....basically a 3 finger grip....unless you have small hands....then you get 4 fingers...LOL You're correct in the knife design aspect. I spent months looking at different ideas...literally it finally came down to picking 6 ideas that I liked....then with the proper amount of alcoholic influence I rolled a 6 sided dice to make the selection....end result is as you saw in the picture...
    1 point
  7. Blade inlays: Campo de Cielo Meteorite & W1 Remainder of blade: 1084 powder Handle Scales: Walnut Burl w/faux ivory (Arvorin) inlays Fittings: 416 stainless
    1 point
  8. Great looking blade Gray. I really like the handle with the inlay
    1 point
  9. I usually don't like the ball bearing Damascus but that 1 came out pretty cool looking
    1 point
  10. I think it looks better without the guard. I also think it will be nicer to use. I find guards on small blades to be mostly a nuisance. I agree that it is important for skill building to make the knife you initially designed so I would say contour the handle and finish this knife and then make one that adheres to your design.
    1 point
  11. I liked the video, thanks for posting. I just started with hot metal, so seeing a variety of approaches is certainly useful.
    1 point
  12. That sounds very complicated.... I have two cut-offs from kitchen counter tops (melamine) about 4"x6" Cover both with wax paper (each time) Put down a thin layer of resin followed by material, resin, material, repeat. Put the other piece of "wood" on top and press together with 4 G-clamps until they won't compress anymore Burlap needs more resin than you might imagine. Lot's of resin will peel out the sides, but as long as the material is properly impregnated with resin that's fine. I've made more slabs of micarta than I can count using this method with very
    1 point
  13. With regards to plating steel and rust prevention, mind that there are two ways to do it: plating with a more noble (cathodic) metal then steel, and a less noble (anodic) metal. A less noble metal like zinc will protect steel as a sacrificial metal. Even if the steel gets exposed, it is protected by the zinc, because the oxygen will react with the anode (positive charge). Copper is more noble then steel, which means that copper on it's own will not corrode as fast as steel. But when copper plated steel gets exposed, then the steel will become the anode, and the reverse will happen: the st
    1 point
  14. This is the first run for Finn the power hammer on hot steel. It is also the first firing for the forge. Nothing fancy, just forging down some orishigane I made in an earlier version of the forge out of some 1800's wrought iron nails. It is clear that I am way out of practice with forge and hammer:)
    1 point
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