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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/01/2020 in all areas

  1. I wanted to make a very traditional folder, something as traditional as quaffing mead, boar hunting, getting into a long boat and raiding the coastlines of Europe. So I designed and made a pocket seax. This is the second one, the first had the thicker, more rounded handle of a fixed blade seax, so I decided to trim the handle down while retaining a bit of a rise towards the end. This one is 4" long from bolster to the end of the lanyard loop. I am thinking of doing a smaller, 3 1/2" version as well. SAE1070 blade and spring, Brass bolsters and liners, p
    6 points
  2. Hello, I want to show you my latest project. This Falchion is inspired by 14th century originals. Specifications: - length 80,5 cm - blade length 64 cm - blade width at crossguard 3,9 cm - max blade width 5,35 cm - weight 1051 g - CoB 9 cm - nz3 steel -copper inlays on the pommel - wood and leather scabbard - brass handmade buckle and strap ending
    3 points
  3. Got my annual post Christmas forge day today, went in with no plan, other than to patternweld something! I had a variety of bits and bobs of interesting material knocking about, so just went at it, with no real plan. ( well, actually the plan was for something a bit longer than this, but the wrought iron laminate really did not like being twisted!) I had a lump of wrought iron 'damascus' left over from cladding material for the chefs knifes, I think its wrought / mild / possibly a hint of shiny metal in there. It had 90 layers chalked on it, it looks low layer in the tw
    2 points
  4. Greetings Fellows of the forge, While I am waiting for the leather to get shipped to Darwin for the sheath to house my recently finished Seax I have been spending my time making wood carving chisels, gravers, punches and researching how these sheaths were constructed. Well In my research I have viewed countless Seaxes both historical and recreations and have decided that I absolutely love the Broken Back style blades especially the Long pointy ones. I also came across the Baltic style War Knives and after reading the Baltic War Knives thread in History I dec
    1 point
  5. Beautiful work, though i have to say i think the guard overpowers the design.
    1 point
  6. 1 point
  7. Once I get a pommel nut made the hilt components will all be roughed out. Then it will be time to fine tune, sand & polish them for final assembly.
    1 point
  8. Rock on with it Rob !! I too smells the smoke ..............
    1 point
  9. Yeap One of the best seax projects I've seen lately.
    1 point
  10. The character voids make you stop and realize this object was handmade. I doubt they are a functional weakness. Great work Mr. States
    1 point
  11. They are both 1" wide. The long one is 5.25" long. The little one is 3.25" long.
    1 point
  12. Here's a good read. https://knifesteelnerds.com/2018/12/03/cryogenic-part1/ We can see that in many cases, dry ice will do most of the job and in some cases, just a freezer will help too. The goal of his article was to demonstrate that "N2 or nothing" is a misconception of how cryo Works.
    1 point
  13. If you really want to try liquid nitrogen, you can probably get some pretty easily. Just bring an insulated container (e.g. a styrofoam cup) to a welding gas supplier. They should be able to fill it for you. Not saying you should do this, but that you probably can. Probably best to call ahead first.
    1 point
  14. Those are both beautiful, Josh. Really like the little one. What are the lengths of the blades?
    1 point
  15. To celebrate my Christmas time off, I forged two seaxes from bloom (iron and steel). I smelted the steel (right, in the photo above) back in March from powdered hematite ore ("Spanish Red"). I helped Mark Green and Daniel Cauble make the iron (left, above) at an SCA event in October, using Mark's "easy ore" (NC limonite). Mark and I, feeding charcoal and ore into the smelting furnace: First, I had to compact the iron bloom into a bar: After doing the same to the steel, I forge welded the two together into a billet
    1 point
  16. The biggest thing that stands out to me is how extremely short the grinds are. Sabre grinds usually go up about half of the blades width, and full flat grinds go almost all the way to the spine of the blade. Your grinds are super short, only like 20 percent of the blades width. I recommend doing full flat grinds, they seem more difficult, but are actually easier to line up with each other on each side of the blade, and they make blades cut much better then short bevels, in my opinion.
    1 point
  17. Rob, that's really looking great. Impressive work.
    1 point
  18. Gorgeous blade John. If you’re going to Owen’s hammer-in next year, bring that blade along. I’d love to see it in the flesh.
    1 point
  19. On to the fittings. This is how I did it. Cut the copper pipe and flattened it. I then cut the pieces to size and marked the fold creases with a bluntish cold chisel. Then just opened my vise a bit and used a bit of scrap brass the same thickness of my leather and hammered it down to get my u shapes. To make the rings I cut strips from some thick copper plate and heated them up in the forge and then quenched them to soften them before bending them around some steel pipe and brazing the joints. Here are the fittings so far laid out in order. Still got some c
    1 point
  20. P.S. As an historical example,here's an old classic filmed about the process at E&S,Maine....overlayed bit at about 4:00...it may not be quite as massive as i write above,but these guys have their process down,et c.,et c......
    1 point
  21. Everyone takes a rocket to Russia!
    1 point
  22. And so here it is. After grinding to 220 on the belt, I drew back the tangs. Then it's on to setting the shoulders. I decided to cut these for all four shoulders. Fitting a triangle tang is a bear to get tight. The 4-shoulder method gives me a little play. During one operation, the tang sliced the 2x72 belt, got jammed between the work rest and the platen and nearly took the top joint of my pinky off. Good thing I keep super glue around...….. It also put a small chip/crack in the edge. I had to grind that out. Finish sanding to 400 grit a
    1 point
  23. Muy interesante!!!! Muchas gracias, Joshua!!!
    1 point
  24. Thanks For the Faith fellas. Well keeping with the dark theme of the raven I tried my hand at drawing up a design and gave my first try at tooling leather a go (Thanks Josh for your tutorial). As with everything there is always heaps of room for improvement and I will need to make more tools but in any case this is where I am at so far. It would have been much better and easier to tool the leather flat before moulding but I had to mould the broken back hump in and could not see a way to do the tooling first. Next is stain leather and make fittings.
    1 point
  25. Well I decided on a raven theme for this knife. I can imagine this type of knife could have been used as an instrument of death. Possibly owned by an archer to finish off not only wounded game but also those left dying on the field after an epic battle. I thought that ravens were very fitting and also fitted in with the dark horn handle. I found the horn a nightmare to try to carve as it was kind of stringy and wanted to tear in strips if that makes sense. I ended up using both the dremel and some chisels and gouge I made to cut the outline of the ravens. I also someti
    1 point
  26. Thanks Josh...Shine on you crazy diamond! I did some shenanigans with some of the materials I have at hand ( horn, bronze and copper) and feel it is coming together though nothing is set in stone. Still got to make copper spacers to fit between things and I will reassess how it looks This is my least favourite bit but once done I can get on to some carving. oh. When I’m done I think I will kill that pumpkin.
    1 point
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