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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/02/2020 in all areas

  1. Well, we've got woodcarvings, illustrations from manuscripts, and stone carvings that show this is how they were mounted, so there you go... The modern "Swedish" pattern is pretty much this same thing, only symmetrical top-to-bottom rather than one-sided.
    3 points
  2. Sheath completed, a simply pocket sleeve. Hand saddle stitched and buffed with some paste wax. Simple and tidy. Stamped with Makers mark and blades serial number. Yep this makes blade 11 finished. That completes the build. Thanks so much for following and commenting.
    3 points
  3. Knife all finished out. High grit sanding to 600g, and finished in danish oil. Copper polished on buffer. Sheath and sharpening on stones left to go. Tear drop hand shaped handled with balance point right on the bolster. Feel good in hand, three finger grip or pinch grip for some kitchen work. I think it meets the brief spot on. What's your thoughts?
    3 points
  4. I am going to make a few more of these. This one I had to make historically accurate with the eye punched off center and twisted a bit!!!
    2 points
  5. Been a while since last update. I keep forgetting to post up progress here. The heat treat went very well. I quenched to just below critical then straight into a straightening jig, 2 massive plates in the vice. Had only a very slight warp to the tip where the distal taper was. Then I had to torch temper the blade. This was a bit tricky, and I think I slightly over heated the blade in one spot, although I have found varying colour charts and sources that say different things about where this type of blade wants to be tempered to. next up was grinding the bevels and the fuller. The bevels went very well. Then came a real mistake from me. I should have done the fuller first, before the bevels. I also should have made a small wheel attachment for my 2x72 and not used the top idler wheel of the platen. Oh well, now I just have lots of clean up to do. I also test etched the blade Next I started forging out the swept hilt. Had to try and get a lot of weight out of the hilt after forging and here's where it is right now handle on, hilt in its final form and a rough pommel. Still tons of refining and polishing to go, but I'm happy. It feels great in the hand and I managed to get the weight down to 1.2kgs/ 2.6lbs which I think is acceptable. Thoughts?
    2 points
  6. I got the blade I made at Gary's heat treated today. Here is a sneak peak at the pattern.
    2 points
  7. Sometimes I like to use big words which I dont fully understand to make myself sound more photosynthesis.
    2 points
  8. Watchin, as I always do on your projects
    1 point
  9. That came out well! And yes, gladii are no-nonsense brutes of a weapon. Most short swords are.
    1 point
  10. This one has been on the back burner for a while but I've now got the blade ready for hand sanding and the handle parts roughed out:
    1 point
  11. Roman Pompeii style takedown gladius complete (minus some extra fuss on the pommel nut/plate). 21.75" blade, 30.25" OAL. The sword feels purposeful in the hand and ready to work. This was a challenging build for me, and I'm already daydreaming about my next large project. Thanks to anyone checking this out -- I'd appreciate any feedback. You can follow me on IG @shamulnu for more projects I labor through. Long blades aren't easy to photograph. Dan Carlin (Hardcore History) described the gladius as a "cleaver" in one of his podcasts -- and that seems pretty spot-on.
    1 point
  12. I have pondered on that also......................
    1 point
  13. Is it just me that always thinks it looks like the head on a Viking hammer was put on upside down?
    1 point
  14. Now THAT looks like a real Viking hammer! And you resized the pics, the forum appreciates that.
    1 point
  15. My latest hammer. I still need to do some finish forging and give it a good brushing. I really like how this one turned out. I will get some pictures of the 4 lber later but that still needs quite a bit of work done to it.
    1 point
  16. Thanks guys. There's a madness to my method......
    1 point
  17. I found myself with a few hours of spare time today. I picked up a piece of 1095 scrap and thought, I could make a knife out of that. The scrap piece measured about 3 inches long, 1-1/8 inch wide and was anywhere from 1/4 inch to 3/8 inch thick. I welded a piece of 3/8 inch square for a handle and went after it. The first step is making a uniform bar. I forged it out to 1/4 inch thick and 1 inch wide by what ever it came out to be in length (approx. 5 inches) I always work the blade first because I have a size & shape I am intending. Then I draw out the handle area, making it about 3/16 inch thick.
    1 point
  18. That’s a great little knife Chris and nicely finished off too.
    1 point
  19. Sure am glad I quit drinking a year ago. That pattern would have made me think I'd gone off the deep end!!!!! Seriously, I like that pattern. Makes me cross-eyed. Cool!
    1 point
  20. Pretty cool, but I'm going have to ding you for not welding the 3/8 bar on straight and centered :-)
    1 point
  21. Amazing what a bladesmith can forge out of so little stock. Nothing wrong with stock removal makers, I've done it and am comfortable doing it (due to poor forging skills) but I often think how wasteful it is doing stock removal. There's more forging in my future.
    1 point
  22. OK, here ya go. I came across a couple when researching my PID build. The first link is the one is the one I thought Charles dP was referring to https://bladeforums.com/threads/wiring-a-pid-for-your-tempering-toaster-full-walk-through.1655733/ https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/diy-heat-treat-oven-build.1576402/
    1 point
  23. There is nothing on this earth that can’t be improved by the addition of googly eyes.
    1 point
  24. Yep, stacked leather, it's the first one I've ever done. I'm reasonably pleased for a first one. Geoff
    1 point
  25. Thanks for reviving this thread Geoff. I have a bunch of pine tar(?) or pitch I saved from my charcoal making and was meaning to try some cutler's resin on my next seax. I also watched a few more of the videos in that series. Splendid stuff. Eager to see what other folks may have in the resin works. BTW- for those who don't have the means or desire to make your own pine tar, it is readily available at most farrier supply or horse veterinarian supply stores.
    1 point
  26. Hello. Not so long ago became the owner of this Viking spear. There are not many mentions of wolf teeth spears on the net. Perhaps this topic contains the largest number of images of such copies. And only thanks to this topic I understood what I'm dealing with. The spear was mechanically cleaned of oxides and etched pattern on the blade.
    1 point
  27. The finishing is a series of straightening, planishing, and beveling heats, until I am satisfied with the profile and shape. Here is the spine with distal taper. Here is the edge, nice and centered. And here is the finished forged blade next to the template and the drawing. I have found that the template handle is a little too thin (top to bottom) and the blade width needs to be a little wider to match proportions. The blade is profiled and in the annealing oven so I can layout and drill the pin holes tomorrow.
    1 point
  28. The finger groove is worked on a round bick I made from an old jackhammer bit. The belly curve is worked on the anvil horn. I have recommended this many times, so I'll say it again. I always work from a template made out of 1/8 inch flat stock. I draw the profile out on an anvil with a soap stone for reference while forging. I can lay the forging on top of the drawing to see where it needs to move. The final forging should cover the lines of the drawing to allow for profile grinding.
    1 point
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