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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/14/2020 in all areas

  1. Sorry for the delay. Between work and the fire department, it's been a crazy week for me. I'm just now finding some time to chill out and relax a little. Here's the main products of the forging session @Jeremy Blohm and I had last weekend: 42 layers of 1084/15n20 and a 2lb version of Jeremy's Type 1(?) Hammer head. It was pretty much my first time forging anything that wasn't a blade or a fire poker, and definitely my first time playing with a power hammer. It still blows my mind that he was able to take a chunk out of the center section of a railroad track, s
    3 points
  2. Rob,i'll try my best at a brief,and least complicated explanation(it's actually a very complex scene). There're two different kinds of cuts there in the smoker mixed up.(smoke,btw,contributes nothing to preservation,it's only to keep flies away). The almost-whole width fillets with cross-cuts is "dia'gah",the way native people here dried their fish for the rest of the year(salmon only run for a few weeks in summer,but run in huge numbers,so this was The mainstay of diet,there's precious little else here.In spring,when dry fish ran short,many would die of starvation just
    2 points
  3. That sucks man . I just wanted to tell that you can indeed lower hardness to solve this problem OR grind the blade thinner and keep the same hardness. Thicker cross section puts more stress on the steel as it bends. Had your blade been thinner, less stress would have been applied for the same bending angle so it would not have snapped. Two years ago, I made a small kitchen knife in 1095 tempered to 60hrc. That steel is known to have low toughness(around 10ft/lbs at this hardness), yet I can almost bend the last 2" at tip 90°. And it springs back perfectly straight every time.
    2 points
  4. You're missing the obvious solution: Make more hammers to fill it up.
    2 points
  5. That looks fantastic Zeb. Very best of luck in the heat treat.
    1 point
  6. That is just great, my friend! Can't wait to see it done.
    1 point
  7. Getting started on the handle inlays:
    1 point
  8. A better shot of the p-weld sitting near perfectly within the fuller And 4 1/2 hours of sanding later and I still have another side to go. This thing was just over a pound when I weighed it last IIRC. I'll be curious to get it back on a scale. 100% accurate or not, it should be sharp and fast! If it should survive HT.
    1 point
  9. Right, here we are. I’ve just opened the bottle and poured a tot. It is unlike any whisky I’ve had before. In a way it reminds me of going from blends to single-malt. It has a mild earthy, sweet smell with something that is familiar but I just can’t place (probably sheep poo ). Taste-wise it is immediately bitter with a smoky hint. This is quickly followed by a tanginess that gives way to an almost sweet slightly smokey (less so even than Talisker Storm) sharpness. Do I like it? Yes but it will take more than one dram (or whatever the Icelandic equivalent is called) to get my head around it.
    1 point
  10. Joshua, I believe that you're seeing pearlite or retained austenite. 1095 is always a tricky quench and it's hard to get a high % of martensite. You didn't say what your quench oil was. Also you didn't say at what temperature you had the quench oil. All can play a part in this. I don't believe that it's an auto hamon as they're usually more linear than this. I believe that it's probably an incomplete austenitic conversion. Just my $.02.
    1 point
  11. The grain does look good! If the break was in the middle of the blade, though, that's pretty thick. It's normal to be over 1/4" thick at the guard, but that usually tapers quickly to almost half that by 1/3 of the way along the blade, then tapers on out to almost nothing at the tip. That is for one of these longswords, tapers vary quite a bit on different styles. If any are still available, you should get a copy of "The Sword: Form and Thought" by Peter Johnsson. It is ostensibly the catalog for an exhibit of the same name at the Deutsches Klingenmuseum (German Blade Museum) from a few ye
    1 point
  12. Real pity about the snap Rob. Nice grain and nice fish though. This was my best (about 12 years ago), a 31lb Fenland Pike. Sorry, it is a photo of a framed photo. Kinda ruined pike fishing for me, I’ll probably never get even close to this again.
    1 point
  13. Just did a bit more research. It seems that the Dalstrong Gladiator series fillet knife is 55 HRC and the Wusthof fillet is 58HRC so if the next one I make is out of 5160 to get approx 57 HRC I will temper at 260 C.
    1 point
  14. Thanks Joel I agree about this and was a bit worried at 190c it might be a bit brittle for such a thin blade so I gave it two more at a tad over 200c Hi Alex thanks for your thoughts on this too. It is interesting you say about selling knives as I often get enquires about if I make fillet knives and if I get it right I might make a few to sell to put towards a long overdue decent belt grinder
    1 point
  15. Lol. I'll probably start stabilizing some of it tomorrow. I've been trying to decide what I want to do for a handle on the dagger I'm working on. I'm thinking a piece of this with copper or bronze fittings is going to be a winner.
    1 point
  16. wow thats got some crazy stuff going on. though I wouldnt wanna touch that with hand woodworking tools, the grain seems to be going in every which direction and back. im also currently working w walnut wood, I really like the smell, I would describe it as "mellow and rustic comfort" other people tho...have told me it makes me smell like I came out of an old building... eeeyeah...maybe watch out for that, if youre planning on meeting folks after XD
    1 point
  17. Even better, I'm going to help him make his own. He coming by tomorrow to get started.
    1 point
  18. I'm watching this one with interest Rob. I feel that fillet/boning knives are one of the handiest all around blades to have when processing meat at home. If I ever get to the point where I make knives to sell, I think that they'd be one of the easier styles to turn over, depending on the audience that is. When it comes to blade shape, I think it's more dependent on what the knife is getting used for than anything else. For large fish like your barramundi, or the salmon we get here out of the great lakes, a longer and wider blade with a gentle curve and good flexibility to it seems to
    1 point
  19. As counter intuitive as it may be, hardness does not affect flexibility. For example, take two fillet knives in 1084 with the exact same geometry. The one at 56hrc will take the exact same force to bend at a certain angle than the one at 61. The harder one will even bend further before undergoing plastic deformation. But the harder one will also be more likely to snap while the softer one takes a kink.
    1 point
  20. I did this tanto a very long time, from the same steel
    1 point
  21. I used to be indecisive.... now I’m not so sure anymore.
    1 point
  22. A few more handles done today Bushcraft hunter with micarta, Thumbrest skinner with swamp kauri over micarta, skinner with ebony over copper, mini skinner with impala jigged horn over blue liner, mini skinner with macrocarpa over micarta, hunter skinner with swamp kauri over ebony, and another hunterskinner with eucalyptus over micarta.
    1 point
  23. Brings back memories of before I had a lathe.
    1 point
  24. I had to take a picture from a distance and zoom in and screen shot it to get a good enough picture
    0 points
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