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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/15/2020 in all areas

  1. Well it looks like success. Heat treat went well with just a slight bend which came out in temper. I did 3 cycles At 220c. The blade spine is 1.7 mm tapering to .7 near tip and has good flex but not too much. I still have to grind in bevels and clean up but happy.
    2 points
  2. This is something that I have never tried before, and my reason for picking this as my KITH project. Believe it or not, I've never tried to forge a fuller, or beveled a blade that had a central fuller. (I've always ground them) I had to make the fullering tool today, but I got the fuller in and about 1/3 of the way through beveling before my propane tank started freezing up. I still have a lot of forging to do. Once the bevels are in I'll probably go back over the fuller lightly to even it out and smooth out any wonkiness I create in the process. I need to draw the
    2 points
  3. Allright.It was brief. Proposed edge,leaf-spring section,possibly 5160 or similar. After a few welding heats,it looked like this: and that's all i can do.There's precious little mass at front of eye,i cannot manipulate the forging without loosing a crit.amount,making this a different type of tool than intended,and so will just trim the outline and look into the welds. Proposed trim: Welds are all good(not surprised,i Felt that). Outline can no longer
    2 points
  4. Most excellent! And of course you are correct, and are not belabouring the point about the form and section of the head being the most important thing about it. I have started doing my best to forge axes and hawks completely to shape with as little stock removal as possible myself. It's a game-changer if you're used to stopping when it's almost there and relying on the grinders to finish the job. That said, I've had to walk away from a half-finished head more than once, it's a big job for even the little ones. The black locust haft ought to last forever. That's one tough wood
    1 point
  5. Thanks,Chris. I want to belabor this one point(i often feel like Such a bore and a nag...but just don't have that gift of a good narrative,and it's tough to bring across some points that seem important). Those of you that actually read these mad rambling accounts would have noticed how much i sweat the blade sectional shape... Close to the edge,and further from it,it makes or breaks the axe as a tool.... But it's qualities as a tool is what gives an axe it's shape,to begin with! Maybe i can draw a parallel here with electrical current-it needs to Flow,fro
    1 point
  6. Win-win-win! That's cool, Garry.
    1 point
  7. I do enjoy the different materials and beautiful woods I get to use in this knifemaking endevor. Some stage as the some of the handle blocks I got from this big burl had bark inclusions and voids so after they have dried, I will stabilise them and look at making a silicone mould so I can do some resin casting as I have seen some very nice results from this method of saving nice pieces for handles and adding colour at the same time. I got just on 50 blocks from it (5 x 1 1/4 x 1 5/8)
    1 point
  8. It depends on what kind of knife it is. If the cutting edge stops before the start of the handle (like when there is a ricasso or choil) then I sharpen after everything else is done to avoid working on a sharp knife, which is the main downside of sharpening earlier. With knives where the edge goes all the way to the handle, I sharpen the blade first since I won't be able to reach the part right next to the handle once it's all together. In that case you have to be a bit more careful to not damage the edge or cut yourself.
    1 point
  9. For me, at least, David, sharpening is the last step. Other folks steps may vary but that's the way I prefer.
    1 point
  10. Found this old bread and butter knife in a second hand store - no visible makers mark. Someone had sharpened it. It takes and holds a great edge, flexes like an acrobat and returns to straight . They don’t make them like that today. If all else fails I will fillet my Barramundi with it. Anyhow forged up another today out of 1075. Here is a pic as forged. I left the handle oversized but will refine it in profiling. I tend to make handles too small. the starting stock was 4mm thick and I forged the blade to 2mm with a slight distal taper in blade and tang. no
    1 point
  11. Mike came over today and got started. We had a really good time. It's kind of different being in the "instructor" role when it comes to forging/bladesmithing, but we got it figured out. I've always preached at the fire department that the best way to learn something is to teach it. I guess today I got a dose of my own medicine. Here's his blade after forging: We got the profile cleaned up on the belt sander and I sent him home with my big bastard file to finish getting the flats cleaned up and true. I forgot to take a picture before he left, but it's coming along nice
    1 point
  12. That blows my mind. What a process and you would have to get it right as there is such a short window of opportunity to catch those fish. We can catch fish all year round but the fishing gets better during the build up before the wet season though it is uncomfortably hot and humid. I have seen where bears eat those fish when they come in great numbers but had no idea they only came for a short while.I really appreciate you taking the time for that reply
    1 point
  13. That was actually the first hammer of Type 3. I changed some order of operations and ended with that
    1 point
  14. Getting started on the handle inlays:
    1 point
  15. A better shot of the p-weld sitting near perfectly within the fuller And 4 1/2 hours of sanding later and I still have another side to go. This thing was just over a pound when I weighed it last IIRC. I'll be curious to get it back on a scale. 100% accurate or not, it should be sharp and fast! If it should survive HT.
    1 point
  16. Joshua, I believe that you're seeing pearlite or retained austenite. 1095 is always a tricky quench and it's hard to get a high % of martensite. You didn't say what your quench oil was. Also you didn't say at what temperature you had the quench oil. All can play a part in this. I don't believe that it's an auto hamon as they're usually more linear than this. I believe that it's probably an incomplete austenitic conversion. Just my $.02.
    1 point
  17. Hoping so,man...But the day started out unauspiciously,the halves of my pre-form were not as congruent as i thought... The top matched a bit better... It was that setting down of the blade portion that skewed my works...So now i had to decide,do i fix it,and make things match and mate nice,or do i just hit it? I'm pretty half-@ss by nature,but also what i'm doing here is trying to re-establish a pretty old sequence...So asking myself-Would they stop and correct something like this in some rural Pennsylvania forge in the early 1800's?-i deci
    1 point
  18. Yep, one large barramundi is required for the next step!
    1 point
  19. That looks like a successful experiment. Only one test left to do and that requires you to go fishing......
    1 point
  20. Worked up a beginning of the next pre-form today. I went from 1/2" thickness of stock to 3/8",but the dimensions are still ample,it's 2 5/8" wide this time....(i don't know how to force myself to go lighter...seems like to keep the proportions balanced i end up using way too much mat'l). There are two things i'm keeping in mind this time. This here info,depicting two stages of a pre-form: Resulting,presumably,in axes similar to these: And the second some photos of existing originals,such as this:
    1 point
  21. Hello.... For over 11 years I have been working on traditional Japanese edged weapon, specifically grinding and polishing blades and making rim of swords. I use traditional materials and their modern modified analogues. Forging and heat treatment of blades are done by my friend Dmitry, he is a professional blacksmith and gunsmith with experience over 10 years. Since 2016, i began making art knives, in the styles: cyberpunk / bio-mechanics, using some of the best materials and precious metals. I try to do all the work in the highest quality, studying new technologies and do various experim
    1 point
  22. Here's a trial fitting,the blade material is an old leaf-spring that i got lucky with weather and managed to use PH to pein out to the needed 1/4"-ish thickness. Together with both sides of pre-form,and gaps,it's about 1" in thickness...Sickening thought,forging by hand...:( (eventually this works out to be about the conventional(nowadays) 3 1/2 lb axe...I MUST scale down,it's killer handling this much steel...:( Trimmed to contour and wired for welding: After a few welding heats that Bulge upward of the outline of course begins to d
    1 point
  23. Thanks,Alan...I think i may exclude that full-length bit out of my algorithm....I don't see consistent enough data for it,and frankly it's killing the tendons in my right arm peining a san-mai blade of that area...:( (too cold to use my PH,it's -32 again this morning...and i need to modify the dies anyway to do axe-blades...). Some photos from the next attempt(# 11 i guess it'd be). It's very convenient starting out with a parallel-sided strap,easy to do mensuration and layout. I also think it's plenty consistent with history,as strap for the carriage trade Mu
    1 point
  24. That same pre-form folded double,blade vweld completed with second half in position,than the bend(with whatever excess)cut off. Another piece 1/2" thick inserted between the poll halves,and welded(these 3 separate thicknesess of a 1/2" eventually give the poll thickness of 1 13/8"): Hard-plate is Frankensteined on with wire(my tombstone Lincoln is down:(...),and welded on: The protruding edges of that butt-plate get bent over and smeared down the sides of poll,creating an illusion of the steel being thicker than it really
    1 point
  25. Aw man,thanks for that description...Sounds Uber cool,kinda makes one think of Blackthorn or something... (not that i've seen Any of those either!:)...Too many decades,too far north...). A tragic story about this:My sweetheart was trying to bring in a piece of blackthorn,and a piece of yew for me,from the Severn valley where she lives...At the customs in Seattle this idiot announced to her that it cannot be,for these woods "would propagate"(!!!). She was exhausted after an endless flight and no matter howshe phrased it just could not convince this moron that the ce
    0 points
  26. Well guys I flew too close to the sun on this one. Yet another entry to my graveyard of broken dreams. I was cleaning up any scratches and decided to give it some flex testing which was easily enough for a filet knife but I pushed just that bit too far and snap! This to me fully supports Joel’s ( sorry Joel not sure how to put those dots over the e in your name) comment that hardness does not effect the flexibility. I had good flex in this blade and the gain structure looked good so that said to me the quench and geometry were ok but I feel where I
    0 points
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