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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/16/2020 in all areas

  1. I recently posted an Anglo saxon style seax blade that i had fitted and finished. This time its a blade that I forged myself, 3 bar construction (random, pinstripe, twist). the blade style isn't historical, it is my own design, and the handle isnt historical either, it is in art deco style. I expect the aesthetics to be divisive, but i like the fact that this is, as far as i can tell, a fairly original style. I haven't seen anyone make this style of layered handle although these days very little is truly original, i'm sure someone some where has done this before!
    2 points
  2. I think its time to say goodbye to my favourite project - damascus seax. Triple core damascus (edge n9e, rest o2+s235) Total length 47 cm Leather scabbard with brass and bronze fittings. 1000 $ Feel free to ask if you have questions
    1 point
  3. I've always wanted to make a seax similar to this and hadn't seen many examples. I based it off of the find which is mostly gone. The blade is about 16" and the handle it just large enough for two hands. I used wrought iron for the fittings and a piece of camphor burl for the handle. It's getting close.. still need to go over everything again and peen the tang. Afterwards is the long process of making a sheath. If you've ever made a traditional sheath for a seax.. it's a bugger bear. Hope you enjoy and thanks for looking! More to come as I tackle the sheath!
    1 point
  4. Copy I made of an original 19th century Bowie by the Memphis Novelty Works. Hand forged and ground blade Fifteen inch long with both hollow and convex grinds, aged to match the original. Hand cast bronze sturrip-hilt and mahogany grip. Tinsmithed scabbard with leather lining and pinstriped japaning. www.irontreeforge.com
    1 point
  5. about 19" Silicon Labelle 2 leather over rayskin stainless fittings green laquered 2nd photo is same blade, differential polish - i found it would require obsessive care to maintain - and it's my Daughter's.. 13, so i would have kept it tho - but the blade was just too meaty so i scrubbed it to regrind - finished on worn 220 grit (?) lengthwise on the 6x48 w/a softener on the platen
    1 point
  6. Of course they do, but 5 minutes time would have created a much better piece, in my opinion, without a large increase in the cost. We all make choices, and we all have budgets. I don't like this one, but that is just me and my eye. Geoff
    1 point
  7. Wow Maciej. I can see why it’s a favourite project.
    1 point
  8. Almost all the broken anvils around here have broken feet. It's not from use, but misuse: Anvil Shoots. I would call people who do this to a good anvil "forking morons", but I don't want a COC violation with less than 5 posts, so I won't.
    1 point
  9. Very well done! Thanks for sharing the problem solving too. Those are 2 beautiful blades.
    1 point
  10. It's been a long time away from this forum. Life has truly gotten in the way. But now, I figured I'd stop in and say Hi to all you wonderful people in the craft. Anyway.. Sometimes it's difficult to do less. This knife has been on my desk for rather a long time now. From conception it was the plan for it to have a piece of reindeerantler in the front so that I'd have something to engrave. In fact I've been looking forward to doing it, since it was a rather long time ago I did a serious work of antler engravings. I spent such a long time fiddling with it, drawing designs on the hand
    1 point
  11. Thanks for the sympathy, guys. Security cameras will go in before I put anything back into the shed, and the anvil and tools will be locked up in the garage when I'm not forging. I also noticed that one of the forges was damaged when they were trying to get a propane tank detached from it but that will be an easy fix. Alan, checking the pawn shops sounds like a good idea. We only have a couple in town. My problem is going to find a good leg vice. They seem to be pick-up only in places 1000 miles away, they want almost as much for shipping as they want for the vice,
    1 point
  12. Hello again! Had a thin piece of pattern welded steel that was up to no good, so I figured I'd set it straight. Not much else to be said, did some silver inlay for every fifth millimeter, and the numbers and grades in between are all copper for better contrast. Lightly etched and then waxed. Presto! Hope you all like it
    1 point
  13. We have a very advanced unit that works on a similar principle at work. Metallurgically, I hate these things with a fiery passion. The definition of hardness, as far as material science (including metallurgy) goes, is "the resistance to localized plastic deformation" (Wikipedia gets it right). A rebound does not test this, and they never have and never will. Rebound tests can be useful and can definitely tell you some useful information. If you have an appropriate sample of metal (this is not very common) then you can indeed correlate the rebound to a hardness. The problem lies in differ
    1 point
  14. Ryan, Thanks for bumping this. I forgot to post additional pics of that boat, and seeing how it interests you, Here they are. This one gives you an idea of what the hull and keel shapes were like. This was a double-hull construction. The urns were for cargo mostly and were tapered at the bottom so they could stand upright in holes bored through storage planks. A close up of the bronze and lead nails used to hold the lead and wood together. Here is another major gate. This one is outside a church/cath
    1 point
  15. I thought some may be interested in my latest project so here's a look: 30" blade of 300 layer Damascus-- This is the heat treating jig that I used to help keep the blade straight during H/T. (It also works like the clay on a katana in that it keeps the spine from forming martensite in the quench.) Not shown here were several metal clips to hold the entire length tight against the middle of the blade. To give you an idea if where I'm going with this one, here's my first rough sketch of the hilt that I plan on making (I have already made
    1 point
  16. Thanks everyone. It went well. I was under from 7am till about 5pm. Doc said it was textbook and almost boring. Last night was terrible. Nausea and vomiting was bad but the pain from midnight till about 6am was worse. Oxycodone nor morphine would help. I gritted my teeth for 6 hours. They gave me to toradol at 6 and I started feeling movement in my bowels. I guess it was pressure. Not had any pain meds since and slept most of the morning. Keep praying. I have a long way to go.
    1 point
  17. Jason the wood guy posted a nice block so I bought it and a couple more to make the shipping worth the cost of getting it here. Yellow cedar burl Nice spalting some very nice "gold" tasmanian blackwood and a very nice piece of arizona desert ironwood
    1 point
  18. Thanks, AJ, those were the knives I was thinking of. It's hard to get old. Memory is the second thing to go and I can't remember the first one. Doug
    1 point
  19. Yesterday, I spent some time hand pollinating the squash blossoms. Today we took a short road trip up to the Flagstaff Arboretum. We had to deliver 4 of Liz's art pieces for the summer show. Then I came back for some archery practice. 50 yard shots.
    1 point
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