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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/07/2020 in all areas

  1. I started this last week while waiting for a shredded tyre to be replaced. It is inspired by the Carrigan Knife, though I've taken a few liberties. Blade is differentially hardened 1095, a little over 1/8th" thick. Handle frame is fileworked 1095. Scales are 6000 year old bog oak. It has a sculpted nickel silver blade collar and back strap, folded NS bolsters, brazed NS scabbard mounts, and NS pins. The only metal fittings which aren't Nickel silver are the frame itself, the Sam Browne which is turned from mild steel and soldered in place, and a 0.3mm sterling silver washer between the blade c
    3 points
  2. Began on this one last Monday to see how fast I could make a decent piece. Originally thought I was going to make a french style long dagger but as I worked my mind wandered as is usual It's overall length is 72cm with a blade length of 56cm. I wanted a stiff thrusting blade so the distal taper is quite minimal and linear going from 7mm at the guard to 3mm near the tip. I did pay for that stiffness with almost 100grams more weight than I had aimed for at 746grams of total weight with the point of balance 5cm from the guard. It still feels so very light and
    3 points
  3. Your wife, whom I’m sure is an intelligent, supportive and understanding partner, is, well, simply wrong. I, on the other hand dabble in the dark art of bladesmithing for a couple of hours over the weekend in an 8x14 space with little to no opportunity for expansion. I could take over my twin 6 year old daughters play room however thinking my intelligent, supportive and understanding (at the minute) partner may have a differing version of “need”. Hmmm, power hammer. Maybe I might see how much clarity another glass of red may bring.
    2 points
  4. This won't be everyone's cup of tea, but I thought I would share my progress on this as I go along. My family spends the 4th of July holiday in Sheboygan every year, and we spend a lot of time walking along Lake Michigan. Each year I look at all the drift wood thinking it would be nice to make some kitchen knives for us all to use that have driftwood handles from our trip. However, drift wood looks cool as a piece of wood, but I've never thought it would look all the great as handle material. I've been doing a lot of wood stabilization lately, and thought I should bri
    2 points
  5. Enjoy the time off. Rest up. Heal quickly. Around here we call them sucker rods. Typically in the 4140-4160 range. Very useful for punches, chisels, drifts etc.
    2 points
  6. its a rather old commercial way of doing it. While I weld the eye closed using the scarfs before inserting the steel which then leaving a gap for the steel to sit in in a separate welding heat. Using this method when perfected the steel and eye weld can be completed at the same time. thanks, You are right on the bevel and rounded out center section of the blade.. It does help to keep the blade from sticking and leverages out of a cut easier. I am often dismayed today that most axes and hatches made are flat bladed.. Not really great for deep cuts with little stic
    2 points
  7. So I do a lot of reading on this forum and occasionally ask questions. You all have been a big help to me in my blade making! So thank you for all your tips that helped me complete this project. So many first on this one! Thanks Jake Cleland and Alan for answers to parts of the build that were totally new to me! Blade is forged from the leaf springs of a 94 Chevy. Blade is 9 5/8“ long and 3/16 at the spine. Handle is Osage Orange from my fathers farm. So after 1 1/2 years I can call it finished!!
    2 points
  8. Hi everyone! After having a fascination with knives, swords and blades for some years, I discovered Alec Steele on YouTube who took my fascination from a low burn, to a roaring flame! The stuff he made has me hooked, but I heard the odd mention of a show called 'Forged in Fire'. Seeing some of the amatuer smiths that went on there and how basic and simple their setups were, convinced me that it's not 'too' difficult to get started. This lead to me finally getting my rear in gear and start getting the bits I need to start. After a year of a slow start, I finally have a w
    1 point
  9. 52100 / 416 SS San Mai, stainless dovetailed bolster with maroon linen micarta scales.
    1 point
  10. It was a little too hot to do any forging today but was a good day for checkering handles:
    1 point
  11. Just used an oxy acetalyne torch to heat them up for the brassing. The guard I brassed before mounting and peening it to the sword but the pommel after it was peened solid to the tang. I like to have both the guard and pommel peened to the sword before setting the grip on. Not nearly as convenient as sliding the grip on and then the pommel but this way all the metal parts can be completely solid without either pressing the wood of the grip or risk having it rattle
    1 point
  12. Post up a photo of the broken axe if you can.. It might be repairable. Also if you don't mind me asking what were the weather conditions when it broke? Winter perhaps? I made this ax for heavy felling work.. With this said. the blade as explained before is designed for wear and the top, tip is always the wearing point with bad swings and such when a tree is on the ground and one is tired. This leading cutting edge is super handy for limbing as it gives just a little extra lead so leads to a slicing action. For overall size it's pretty light at only 3.75lbs head weight and
    1 point
  13. This type of blade construction was rather common in early medieval in central and northern Europe during Viking age. The blade consists of three parts: high carbon steel on the cutting edge, a twisted pattern-welded bar in the middle, and a simple pattern-welded bar on the back of the knife. To forge it I used a scrap metal (as usual in my projects) but this time the scrap metal was very special. I used old bloomery iron and wrought iron nails/bolts/rivets which were found in the Dziwna River in Wolin in the place of the old shipyard/harbor during the building of the new marina (Wolin is
    1 point
  14. @Garry Keown Definitely rest up friend. @Joshua States i noticed it would probably be good for something other than a blade. It is, parond my french..... a total B word to forge. I had it at a very iridescent yellow and it refused to move much using my 5lb maul. Good/bad i have alot of it though. 4+ at home and probably more than 100+ft at my dads. Which is free and accessible. Is it blade worthy or should i do something in particular with it other than punches or tooling?
    1 point
  15. I love it when I learn something from someone's post.
    1 point
  16. Nice. As many years as I've worked with guns (non-commercially), I've never done any checkering. Need to look into that.............if I ever learn how to forge a knife!
    1 point
  17. I’m a little late to this but oh boy we have had a lot going on!! Because four out of the six in my family had a bad bout with pneumonia in February and March we decided to evacuate Ecuador and sit out the virus in rural Kentucky. So we put a garden in. We eat a lot of eggs so why not get a few chickens! Well buying chickens leads to needing a place to keep them so I built a chicken tractor. Also I have been working on furniture to make the house more comfortable. It helps when your dad has a pile of old barn wood!!
    1 point
  18. Anyhow after finishing the rest of the bottle and halfway through the second one, this is the result. It all started from wanting a 10c rivet. I blame you all for fostering this obsession.
    1 point
  19. So I know it’s been a couple of months but life has been crazy!! So I went with the Sil Fos and it has worked great!! Finally have the Dirk and scabbard all finished up!! Thank you for all your advice!! Aaron
    1 point
  20. Finished up the tool rest yesterday and the stand this morning
    1 point
  21. Hello everybody. I am not knifemaker. Sometimes I am making axe heads but most of time - fire strikers. If it not fit for forum I am asking moderators to remove this post. But maybe it will be interesting to somebody. English is not my native. I make grammatical mistakes. Main material for my fire strikers - high carbon steel У10А ( similar to 1095 steel ) All my fire strikers from high carbon steel usually water quenched without tempering. This is the last one - "Bakunava". Bakunawa is a creature of Philippine mythology. Dragon that eating the Moon. Cause of lunar eclipses.
    1 point
  22. My nephew caught the biggest large mouth bass I've ever seen in person.
    1 point
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