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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/25/2020 in all areas

  1. A book that is rather plentiful book for general blacksmithing is "the back yard black smith" by lorelei sims. It a very inexpensive book and has general info on black smith work. Shop set up tooling, general info on low carbon steels. I suggest to get familiar with some fundamentals that book should be a good introduction. The Mark Aspery series is very in-depth detailed. Its focus is again on blacksmith work. For blade smithing, check out the book series "The complete blade smith." There is a whole other spot in this forum for books related to the sub
    2 points
  2. Just finished up and delivered this Hog Hunter knife. 8" blade, long enough to pierce vitals, and a full length semi sharpened back edge to assist with piercing the thick hide. (Customer is providing the brass balls needed to take on a wild hog that up close and personal). Blade is handforged 80Crv2, with an electro-etched boars head on the polished bevel. Handle is stabilized maple, with a blued steel guard, and red fiber spacers. I stippled a portion of the handle for extra grip, and added a lanyard tube/lanyard for knife retention.
    1 point
  3. Got a little more done on a big (hopefully soon-to-be) mosaic billet today. Forged out the second stack-up of crushed Ws and just started forging on the bias before I had to call it quits. I didn't like the look of a split in the end, so once it cooled off, I cut the last 1/4" off to make sure the weld took. Luckily, it's all good and solid! I also did a quick etch to see how it turned out, and so far, so good.
    1 point
  4. Here's the best closeup I have. It did take away from the figuring somewhat, in the stippled area. But I chose a somewhat less figured block I had for that reason. I certainly wouldn't suggest it on a $70 block of gorgeous Koa. But on a nice looking block of stabilized maple, that errs towards the plain side, it makes it a bit more visually interesting, as well as giving a very nice addition to grip retention.
    1 point
  5. Depending on where the sticks are, your closest group might not be an Indiana group. But if you haven't seen this yet, this might help: http://www.indianablacksmithing.org/satellite.html#Orange
    1 point
  6. Welcome, JD. I'd recommend finding and joining your local blacksmithing group, and attend as many meetings as you can. You'll learn a whole lot in a couple of days with experienced smiths, you'll meet folks who have more tools than you do, and most are willing to help out newer smiths, either with instruction, tools, or help in making/getting them.
    1 point
  7. Because of Corona I have much more time for my hobby
    1 point
  8. I've only done a couple, and haven't been truly satisfied with the results, but I have found using a loose abrasive powder is almost critical to revealing the finer details. A bit of brown tripoli on leather works well. A little ferric or hot lemon juice as well, and Mother's Mag polish is pretty good above the hardened part. It tends to wash out stuff on the hardened part itself. I have Mother's and Flitz, and they do different things. Mothers is abrasive, Flitz is chemical/acidic.
    1 point
  9. Looks good Josh. Its little touches like that that really make your knives stand out.
    1 point
  10. In the last photo the "face" really pops out, pretty cool.
    1 point
  11. Thanks Brian Dougherty. I really don’t want it to look Native. I’ve redrawn a few times and I think I’ve got one I like. What do you think of this one?
    1 point
  12. What do y’all think of the design on the paper? I left the initial scribblings on the blade for context. I’m thinking of dipping the whole blade in wax, scratching out the design, and then etching. It’s either that or going full tilt into engraving it.. something I’ve never tried but have always wanted to try. well not true.. but never wrought iron...
    1 point
  13. The amount of time you have to forge hot steel varies on both the alloy and your level of experience, but for most of us we can expect to get about 15-20 seconds of hand forging time on a blade-sized object before it goes back in the forge. Hard fast blows keep the heat going longer, which is why an experienced smith can forge longer per heat than a new guy.
    1 point
  14. It kind of reminds me of #1. So, I don't think it's that far off the beaten path
    1 point
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