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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/26/2020 in all areas

  1. Welcome to the quest! I'd start with these two books, with two caveats on the Boye book. First, no need to use scrap steel as he suggests. Good steel is readily available and cheap. Check out https://newjerseysteelbaron.com/. Second, Boye recommends Aqua Regia (combination of Nitric and Hydrochloric) acid for etching knives. That stuff is alien blood dangerous. Buy Ferric Chloride instead. Easy to find on Amazon. Finally, this forum has been in operation for many years, and almost anything you want to know about bladesmithing is on here somewhere, the trouble is finding
    3 points
  2. hello, One of the last finished projects. Copy of javelin head from Wielbark culture from Rozwadów, Poland. Hand forged from carbon steel with brass inlays. Wings are forge welded to the socket. Copy of spearhead from Wielbark culture from Zadowice, Poland. Hand forged from carbon steel with brass inlays. Thank you Jacek
    2 points
  3. hey, Pair of spurs made for a reconstructor (not to be used for horses). Made of mild steel. First attempt to make... Thanks Jacek
    2 points
  4. For those of you who are wondering which knife it was that got a new guard, it was this one. Now it has the guard it always wanted.
    2 points
  5. This was my first commission for a friend. W2, and walnut crotch with denim liners. I did a little bit of experimenting with grey scotch brite, Super awesome results. Gives it a nice milky high grit satin look. I think this one turned out really well. What do ya think? If you have any critique please do tell. Thanks for looking
    1 point
  6. i guys im new to the forum and posted earlier about this anvil i found in a barn i believe its a american star the horn has seen better days but the face is in great shape and edges are quite nice as well has incredible rebound this barn had a bunch of anvils in it the owner wants $350 per anvil doesnt matter if the anvil is 250lbs or 30lbs he woulnt budge on any prices i grabbed the star and got it home it weighs 166lbs hope i didnt over pay any input would be great thanks
    1 point
  7. Tree frog hiding from the sun, the space he’s in is only a quarter inch wide. and Ospreys nest building.
    1 point
  8. The more I see spear heads the more I want to finish one! I got two pattern welded projects laying around and one has been begging me to be a spear head with some inlay on the socket!
    1 point
  9. hello, Completed project including oak scabbard. Thank you Jacek
    1 point
  10. It comes all the way down to an edge but its a rather steep angle, so it's not what I would term "sharp" (You would have to try to cut yourself with it). The customer is going to look it over before he uses it in the field, and let me know if wants anything changed or adjusted (He's done this hunting before, so he knows what he wants in the knife. I however, will stick to distance hunting, lol).
    1 point
  11. That is indeed an American Star. They are unique among steel-faced cast iron anvils by having that hole in the base. That feature was patented in February 1853. They were made in Trenton, New Jersey (and are no relation to Trenton anvils, which were made in Germany first, then in Ohio, never in New Jersey) between 1853 and around 1870 or so, when they seem to have been bought out by Fisher-Norris. Charles Peters, who owned the patent, may have been an employee of Fisher who broke off to form his own company. Given the shape it's in, $350 is a fair price. It looks like the steel fa
    1 point
  12. That really set it off
    1 point
  13. Yep, that one needed that guard.
    1 point
  14. All files, Halfway through I said to meself, I said "dopey, you have gravers in the drawer over there"
    1 point
  15. FWIW, I think the second one's head is more abstract and therefor more like what I think of when I think of Nordic carving. I also think the knotwork on the first neck leans more into that flavor. I prefer the body in #2 over the body in #1, don't ask me why, I really cannot say.
    1 point
  16. Just finished these up. Clay hardened CS70 and bubinga, with foam lined storage boxes not much else to say about them. let me know what you think...
    1 point
  17. Personally I liked the head of the first one a touch more. But then I really like the body of the second design. Particularly the tail feathers!
    1 point
  18. I like it. Makes me think of a mix of Northern European and Northwest Native American art styles.
    1 point
  19. its a rather old commercial way of doing it. While I weld the eye closed using the scarfs before inserting the steel which then leaving a gap for the steel to sit in in a separate welding heat. Using this method when perfected the steel and eye weld can be completed at the same time. thanks, You are right on the bevel and rounded out center section of the blade.. It does help to keep the blade from sticking and leverages out of a cut easier. I am often dismayed today that most axes and hatches made are flat bladed.. Not really great for deep cuts with little stic
    1 point
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