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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/09/2020 in all areas

  1. Sorry for bringing up an old topic, but was having a browse and noticed this. When there isn't a pandemic going on I normally work within an armoury department for the UK film industry (though usually doing leatherwork). I did not have any involvement in this particular movie but personally know the team who did and have worked with them many times on other films. I certainly recognise the imdb names and am friends with many of them! In this case I believe the hero swords were made in house. Rather than individual craftspeople working from their own workshop, each department is bro
    2 points
  2. Hi I would like to present my new tutorial about how to forge the "Slavic" type cap axe. The cap forging technique I used is one of the many. It is not copy of specific archaeological fond but rather an inspiration of axe from Pien (Poland). Enjoy watching :-)
    1 point
  3. A death grip on the handle causes a lot of damage to body structures; the hand and arm should guide the hammer and let it hit, but a looser grip is needed. The shape of the handle is important as well, most stock handles are too thick and not indexed. I profile mine like the profile of a samurai sword grip, like an oval with square sides.
    1 point
  4. Some recent work during lock down
    1 point
  5. Good score on the files! With the chain, you do the bend test cold, not hot. It still may not be wrought, but try it again cold, and cut the notch with a hacksaw or cutoff disc. That works better than a simple chisel or hardy notch. As for normalizing, there's nothing wrong with doing it after you have the bevels ground, it's just easier and more fuel-efficient to do it as the final step of forging. Well, there's the warping thing, and the risk of decarb, but still, as long as take care you're fine doing it after grinding.
    1 point
  6. This could get very addictive. I really need to develop some carving skills though.
    1 point
  7. Just finished this. Forged 1095 with integral finger guard, antler scales with peened copper rivets. leather blade cover with riveted copper suspension ring, and antler toggle. excuse the picture quality and let me know what you think...
    1 point
  8. Hey everyone! Havent posted in a while, nor have I worked on blades much lately. But things are settling down, and I managed to continue work on this project. I decided to use bronze fittings instead of silver, partially because of price, but mostly because I had lots of bronze on hand. Ive never melted bronze before, but the melting temp is similar enough to silver that I figured it wouldn't be a problem. So I melted a bunch this evening, and voila! Bronze cookie. It's about 2.400 inches in diameter, and about .375 inches thick (~61mm
    1 point
  9. My latest, a W1 integral. I've been really enjoying the process of producing a hamon, and refining my technique aiming for better results each time.
    1 point
  10. I've used black locust for knife handles. It is extremely dense but kinda plain in my opinion. It doesn't shrink at all and is very rot resistant. My buddy has a whole vineyard that he used un-treated black locust for his vine supports. I've been meaning to try it for hammer handles but havent gotten any more from my friend to try it. The lighter part of this handle is black locust
    1 point
  11. Hi all, Here is a batch of lockdown projects just finished. These are all late medieval style eating knives and sheaths. The blades are all just very simple designs forged from 1075+cr, with as close to a flat grind as I could get. The handles are a mixture of apple, laburnum, yew and walnut, with brass pins and bolsters, and the sheaths are all inspired to some degree by originals from 'knives and scabbards', though not exact copies. Since making the blades I have acquired a lot more reference for this kind of knife, and in retrospect they are a little br
    1 point
  12. The blade is forged from 1084, flat ground, and tempered three times. The handle is made of oak, copper, silver, and antler. The sheath is leather, silver, and copper. All the metals minus the blade were smelted from scraps and hammered, filed, and shaped by hand. There is easily 50-65$ in silver on this one. It was a labor of love and I spent entirely too long on it. It is handmade by myself and I'm very pleased with it. It's sharp, accurate, and pretty! I am asking 400$ IMG_7871 - Copy.MOV
    1 point
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