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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/13/2020 in all areas

  1. Howdy, folks. Been a busy, productive year, and not as much time has been spent on forums as I used to. But I have had a couple of interesting projects I wanted to share. They are the two largest carcass splitters I've made so far, one completed in February and one in August. The first was a commission from a chef who owns multiple restaurants who wanted as large a carcass splitter as I could make as a gift for a friend of his. The second was a commission from a fellow who butchers a lot of hogs. Both started out as bars of 5/16" x 4" 80CrV2 steel, and both ended up with hemp cord ov
    8 points
  2. I made a pretty big billet of damascus ad I wanted to make a few blades out of it and this is the first one from that steel. I kind of wanted to try out making smaller and simpler knives than I usually want to do, something more practical for the modern world I guess. The blade is 45 layers and just about 11cm long and has full flat grinds as originally I was planning to make an even simpler migration era style handle. Copper bolster and butt plate and walnut handle. Still thinking about what style of sheath I should make for it so won't sharpen it for now
    4 points
  3. Oh yeah I like where this is going Thickest at the break and tapers down to a nice point tip. It looks like a Seax to me, but I don’t know anything about them so I’ll leave that up to the people who know a thing or two about em.
    3 points
  4. Finally got a mosaic bar forged out (well, except the tang). I'll finish cleaning it up tomorrow and checking for cracks & weld flaws, but for now I ground one side and quickly etched a small section to see what I have. Currently 3/4" x 7/16" x 27", but it should be about 36" long when the tang is forged out. Barring any weld flaws, I'll be starting on the edge bars tomorrow or Saturday. The edges will be low-layer random pattern and this bar will be the core.
    2 points
  5. And just finished the handle on this one. I miscalculated a bit when cutting the big billet down for stacking and this one was made from an off cut so only has 15 layers. I'm using the opportunity to experiment with handle shapes and even though bocote polishes up nicely my lack of photographing skill keep me from capturing the facets well. Copper is of course included in the handle. I think I'll finish one or two more from a twisted billet I made at the same time before making sheaths for the lot
    2 points
  6. Ah James....you just made my day. My thoughts as I was scrolling down....... first pic...that looks very cool and also looks like a fair size. then that pic of you holding it.....bloody hell!!!!! That was a lot bigger than I thought but that last hitchhiking pic did I for me...Hahahaha no wonder the streets look deserted great work man
    2 points
  7. Nice looking everyday carry knife. Often smaller knives are more useful than larger knives. Doug
    2 points
  8. Gee Alan, you really know how to hurt a guy I've used a fountain pen since 1993, and have used a MontBlanc almost daily for 6 or 7 years now
    1 point
  9. If you need to do any heavy drawing out or anything of the sort your more than welcome to come use Smurfette!!! I'm planning on starting mine soon also. I need to make a few tools to accomplish what I wanna do. I will start a WIP as soon as I start!!!
    1 point
  10. Make up several packets. Keep them generally the same size and shape, same amount of carbon source and fire each one for different periods. Then you can break them and see the amount of carbon diffusion you get per inch of material for a given soak time.
    1 point
  11. Looks like a seax to me Conner. Well done. I forged out another double bit axe drift this morning and now I'm punching an eye in a 1 inch by 2 ½ inch by 4 inch chunk of forklift fork for another double bit.
    1 point
  12. Always a good idea to be drinking a beer and sprinkle some on the billet before it goes in the forge. That, plus sacrificing a chicken should appease the gods enough for your purposes I'd think
    1 point
  13. The absolute "cleanest" way I can think of is to buy the blade kits and put them together followed closely by buying blade blanks and putting handles on them. Alan's idea of stock removal with files is pretty clean, but if you want to grind, it will get dusty. Maybe think about a dust collection system. If you are really opposed to creating a mess you have to clean up, find a different hobby Forging in a small propane single burner is easy, fun and if you focus on small blades or thin ones, you won't have much steel and time to create a huge mess. Welcome to t
    1 point
  14. Weve been really getting into axe throwing so I forged this 3 lb double bit axe for my wife. Im going to grind the top lug off and do a little more forging. This little hatchet was my second project for the day. I havent weighed it yet.
    1 point
  15. Very nice knife you made there. I always love copper accents, looks great.
    1 point
  16. I may be off-base here, but my understanding is that the Vendel period is a couple centuries between what we commonly call the Migration era and the Viking Age, so around mid 6th to mid 8th centuries. (some overlap is implied). This was when the Merovingian Dynasty was at it's height, along with some eastern European kingdoms, whose names I forgot. Probably all of those Goths Alan mentioned. The Seax on the other hand was the primary bladed weapon/tool from centuries prior and centuries after. Pattern welding shows up in various places at various times throughout the Roman Age through the V
    1 point
  17. Nice. Clean. Simple. I like it.
    1 point
  18. We refer to those as "historically accurate but darned annoying weld flaws." It'll hold tegether fine, and they'll be hard to see after it's done, and you see them in original pieces, but it's still annoying to the maker.
    1 point
  19. I got some pins installed in the hollow cap, and the matching holes in the upper guard. Now I can hold the knife sideways without the pommel cap falling off
    1 point
  20. Hello all. I'm sorry that this didn't end up being much of a WIP, but here is what the final product turned out to be. I went a different direction with the pattern, and was trying to get clouds over a waterfall look. Not quite what I was hoping for, but I think I know what I need to do differently on the next one, which is to use only one piece of 1080 on the spine portion, which will give me more 15N20 to grind through, leaving more clouds. Any comments/critiques are always welcome from you guys.
    1 point
  21. Hello everyone !!! I hope they are well and are taking care of these difficult times. I want to show you this 17th century Spanish style rapier with an iron cup garnish, decorated with a mixed technique, engraved with pneumatic airgraver and opus interrasile (openwork work) with foliar motifs. It has a thin and straight blade, forged style, made of 5160 steel, two-sided, with two edges throughout. Wooden scabbard lined in black velvet with curb and brass tip. Total weight 900 grs Blade length 100 centimeters from the cup. 6.5mm at the fort and drops to 3m at the tip. the total length 117 Cen
    1 point
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