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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/17/2020 in all areas

  1. a little more done today on this one but had to adjust this old bar cramp my gradfather made for my father in 1949 so it was usable for clamping blades with long guards. Cut a couple of pieces off the end annd with one slotted they were welded to the original cramping blocks and a wider foot welded to the base. With a soft faced clamp on the blade of the knife and the clamp up against the slotted cramping block it allows for the handle to be held securely for the glue up. Not at that stage yet as still playing with the handle shaping but nearly there. Once the handle is all but done and the S
    2 points
  2. They don't pay the smiths. They give them mystery steel (or at least they used to, haven't watched in years) and then the smith's reputation gets hurt if they guess wrong and use the wrong quench. I've heard that (at least in the first couple seasons) the shop was very dangerous, with no ventilation. I've had multiple calls/emails from them and I've turned them down every time. I don't begrudge anyone who goes on the show, and it has been good in raising general interest in our craft, so those that teach bladesmithing have a lot of eager students now. But, I think anyone who sign
    2 points
  3. All that is wrong with modern bladesmithing.
    2 points
  4. Afaik the size of the knife does not really matter in the choice of sheath type. As a general rule a folded sheath is simpler, and you have to do less stitching. attaching a belt loop is somewhat trickier than on a stacked sheath. A stacked sheath has the advantage that tooling is easier, because you are working with flat leather and stiching on a belt loop/retaining straps is simple to do before the parts are put together. A stacked sheath tends to bet a bit wider and less form fitting, and so it can look out of place on smaller knives. For the knife you ment
    1 point
  5. Thanks for posting the pic of the bar clamp. I've been using something similar, but never thought to cut a slot in the jaw for the blade. I've been using a block of wood with a slot cut in it, this will be a lot easier. Again, thanks.
    1 point
  6. Nice setup, Garry. And good job on bending the guard. It's tough to get that right without any flat spots or sudden kinks.
    1 point
  7. Yeah, now that I think about it, maybe it would be best to pour the handle solo first. Then take that and put it in the mold to make the other spacer. Then the third mold is the final product. This way there are a couple really good opportunities to get experience with molding and pouring 20 pounds of brass at a time before the final run. I honestly tried to download a 3D model of Bobba Fett's helmet, but couldn't find anything that played well with Solidworks. I now have several that show up in Solidworks, but nothing that allows for feature recognition, just surfaces. I wa
    1 point
  8. I'm not sure I would be in a hurry to make the coating thicker. I got a little carried away with the castable on my last forge project, and the thing takes forever to heat up now. 1/4" would probably serve you well.
    1 point
  9. That and when you go to fire it. Every step do as slowly as possible. A few days air dry. Then light a lazy flame in the forge for a few seconds. An hour later do it again. Then the next day do a couple more lazy flame burns. Then the next day do a lazy flame so the inside gets up to a few hundred degrees. Then the next day do a few seconds of high fire burn to get the inside up to a few hundred degrees. Then get the inside up to just glowing. Then you should be good. Of course, there is a good chance you can do things quite a bit quicker than all that. You just increas
    1 point
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