Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/21/2020 in all areas

  1. Plans are coming together! Today I spoke to none other than our long-lost brother in beard, Jake Powning, for tips on the casting. As many of you might know, Jake's father is an nationally-recognized artist in Canada who casts large bronze sculptors, among other things, so Jake has a ton of experience with this large casting of silicon bronze. I now have a good idea of how to sprue this, etc. I need to buy a few bits of equipment, but this, along with the generous help I've already received from Jerrod and Alan, should make this quite do-able. Oh, and by the way, after doing a bi
    4 points
  2. I had received the piece of sambar stag in a trade for doing some heat treating years ago. The previous owner had removed a good deal of the bark before I got it and I removed much more. Back when you could get sambar stage for under 10 bucks a piece is when it received its nickname, pour man's ivory. Nice looking piece of bone. Blade was once part of a much larger drag saw blade, fittings are from some of the finest wrought iron west of the Rocky's. Overall length of knife is 11". Surprised myself that I had desire to try making sheaths again. First time for me to use leather over a wood line
    2 points
  3. A number of years back, when Grant was still around, a couple of us were trying to figure out how to combine an induction forge and rolling mill to pump out billets. We decided it could be done if one was able to create a box of some sort to fill with argon or other sheilding gas to prevent oxidation. We decided it wasn't worth the effort to try, partly because it would have involved building a rolling mill as well.
    1 point
  4. Completed last evening. Puukko: 115mm x 22mm blade with beveled spine and slight drop point. Black ash burl handle with brass bolsters and contrasting ebony.
    1 point
  5. Ted made this knife for me sometime around 1976. In his letter to me about this knife, he told me it was the last knife he would make with white linen micarta because he could not get white without the little black specks visible in the handle. I mentioned it in another post and Vern Wimmer showed some interest, so I told Him I would shoot it and post the results. BTW - if anyone has an idea how to remove permanent marker from the handle, I would appreciate the suggestions.
    1 point
  6. In my opinion, it's good to do a single normalization at 1500 (assuming critical for your mix is ~1475) at the end of each forging session. Letting it cool in the forge doesn't do much, but it's not wasting fuel either. As long as you're not holding at or above critical you shouldn't have grain growth issues. With 1095 or the W series hypereutectoid steels, a very slow cool may cause laminar carbide precipitation, or sheet carbide that eats drill bits rather than the spheroidal carbides that machine well. A lot depends on the steel you're using with that one. I see you starting that at 12
    1 point
  7. Dave it is crushed W's but not drilled. I use two plates with 3/8 balls welded to them. I was never a fan of drilling or cutting groves in a billet, I would rather do the pattern with a die.
    1 point
  8. I'm a bit confused, it may be a terminology issue. I think of a through tang as one that is exposed only on the butt end, if at all. Are you talking about a full tang? Some pictures would help. Geoff
    1 point
  9. Another stage completed with assembly this afternoon. Marked out the front spacer in a sunburst pattern and did some filing on it, fully shaped the handle and thinned down a piece of 1/8 carbon fiber to 3/32 for the pin, blued the guard before doing the etch on the blade and epoxying it all together.
    1 point
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...