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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/30/2020 in all areas

  1. Forged a billet of feather pattern recently and finished this little hunter. Fair amount of labor involved in that process, even used my son as a striker to split the billet! 1084/15n20 blade steel, elk antler handle, copper corby bolt and spacer with stainless guard and lanyard hole. Clint
    3 points
  2. Just need and edge on the river sunset Bowie now after getting the sheath done today. Another couple of firsts with the croc skin inlay and the Sam Browne stud strap retention method. learned a great deal and know where improvments can come next time this style is in the order book.
    2 points
  3. Got one of the handles underway but still have a long way to go yet.
    2 points
  4. I would do it on the grinder, get it perfect, then give it one last tiny tickle, somehow let go of it, and get it stuck between the belt and platen at 6000 sfpm
    1 point
  5. And this is the 'hipster special' I could not get pics to post properly a couple of weeks ago! Stabalised OSB and 4000 year old bog oak handle
    1 point
  6. [img]https://i.imgur.com/j3dZJtQ.jpg[/img] couple finished recently!
    1 point
  7. I think we did 7 falchions in that class with the same two pieces of wood.
    1 point
  8. Yeah, I was thinking of taking two 2x4's, cutting thick saw-blade metal sheets - and bolting them onto the 2x4, and then using these to clamp down the blade. That way there will be metal against metal - while support structure will be wood. Then I avoid any unnecessary burning, and I can re-use the tool many times.
    1 point
  9. Yep, that'd work. But so would anything that won't burn/smoke. Basically, you're adding some (thermal?)mass to absorb the heat both to even out the temps throughoutt the space and to minimze temp swings when opening the oven. Over the years, when I was using my kitchen oven for tempering, I've used a variety of things: mostly cast iron pans or scrap chunks of 2" bar stock. (I'm a bachelor, so don't have to content with spousal abuse.) But bricks and rocks would work as well. Just make sure they are competely dry so that they don't crack/explode when heating up due to any moisture in th
    1 point
  10. Very nice, Garry.
    1 point
  11. I saw the sheath and final photos on FB. Really well done Garry.
    1 point
  12. To work with Jake's idea, use two pieces of wood (we call them 2x6 here in the states) and a couple of quick hand clamps. Lay one board on a nice flat table, lay the blade at normalizing heat on it. quickly cover with the other board and clamp the whole thing down tight to the table. Do the same thing when you go for the quench. You can see the setup in the background of this video: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ne0kmIz9X48eI3k1rHwgi4qlv7RlctrB/view?usp=sharing
    1 point
  13. Or make a twisting wrench. Just a slot on some flat bar that fits the blade. Make two. Put one in the vise, and hold the other one. With these you can even straighten it cold. You'll want these if it warps in the quench anyway.
    1 point
  14. Do you have a convection oven, or a friend who does? Convection ovens are supposed to keep the temps more consistent because they have a fan that circulates the air.
    1 point
  15. Straighten in a vice at normalising heat, just above critical, and repeat until it stops twisting - heating to welding heat and hammering is just compounding the stresses that are causing this...
    1 point
  16. You're being too hard on yourself, Gerry. That knife doesn't look one bit crude to me. Good job. Doug
    1 point
  17. The finished product looks very well done. I don't think that the epoxy finish is any worse than a dark varnish. Doug
    1 point
  18. Have this pair done now. I did two in case I mucked up one (only one was ordered) with all the new things I had to do on this type of knife. Not as happy with the handle finish as I could or should be as I did a thinned epoxy brush coat which has given the leather a grey brown rather than a gold brown as most are with just a varnish finish, but it has hardened the leather surface which is the intent so the leather has a bit more protection in daily use I will put a couple of coats of varnish and see if it improves the colour a little.
    1 point
  19. My biggest worry would be one corner being either really hot or really cold. As long as your temperature is consistent everywhere then you should be fine.
    1 point
  20. A little further on this project. I had one of the handles done with a peened steel end cap but wasn't happy with it so ground it off, removed a few leather pieces and pinned an ebony block in its place yesterday. Today it was time for finish shaping the leather and file in the grooves fthen brushed on two coats of thinned epoxy. Will do another sand off tomorrow and pay some more attention to the end cap then continue with the sheaths which I started this afternoon.
    1 point
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