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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/09/2020 in all areas

  1. I seriously hope so. I've been getting pretty good at surfacing blades without one, but it takes freaking forever (probably the longest part of grinding). And the thought of trying fullers has always terrified me. Maybe not so much anymore. I was a bit hesitant when the price came out. Then I watched the video, and it seems more than "just a surface grinder". Made it easier to justify. Two major purchases this year - a forge press and now a surface grinder. I'm beginning to wonder what happened to my wife and who is this person that looks like her...
    2 points
  2. Here is the tube I used. It's 3x3 and I drilled two 1/4" holes through one side and fit two pieces of round rod into them, then welded them in place. This allowed me to put the blade in the tube, spine down, and have it stay that way. It fit right in the front door and the back door closed it off.
    1 point
  3. Well, after literally years of saying I was going to do this whole smithing thing, I've done my first thing. I am starting from the very beginning, with pretty much no budget. Here's the breakdown. Be kind if you comment as I don't really know what I'm doing. I also realize that some of the things I'm doing may not be quite safe, but balancing risk is part of life. Lastly, please don't hesitate to comment and share your knowledge, experience and criticism; I have thick skin. The plan: My father in law donated an old propane tank that I'll be using as the body for a gas forge. I was
    1 point
  4. Something I (and a lot of other makers) do is include a little note with each knife, explaining the proper care and what you will and won't guarantee. After doing this verbally for a while, it gets old.
    1 point
  5. Thanks for the picture, these are really amazing artefacts. To my eyes it looks like the gold is either inlayed, or fused to the iron. Think of the korean ''keum-bo'' process, this technique was actually quite widespread as it is quite easy to get pure gold to stick to other metals. But as always with historical stuff, I might be totally wrong.
    1 point
  6. I made a second one. My hand for size reference. This one was made using Kinetic sand for my mold. The first one was made using a clay mold that still had some moisture in it which caused all kinds of defects. If I was to take my time and actually tried making a mold with real green sand I could see it working out nicely. The second picture is just a copper billet I cast and while still hot I took it to the power hammer. Tomorrow I will get pictures of some of the molds I have.
    1 point
  7. Don't try and make a forging forge a heat treatment forge. They are different animals. You will end up with the worst of both worlds. I posted a thread on here about my little heat treat for the 'the jizer' which shows how little you need for a super accurate heat treatment forge. I can hold a couple of degrees with it. I recall the post I made about the forge was made a 'sticky' in one of the forums on here. Not got time to locate the post now, but will dig it out tomorrow for you.
    1 point
  8. That forge is not ideal for heat treatment because the area is so tight and small. Unless you can get a small enough baffle tube in there so as not to restrict the burners, you could probably use it for heating smaller knives up to heat for a quench. The thermocoupler is probably not necessary in such a small space. Just learn to watch for decalescence and recalescence. If you were planning on making a new set up specifically for heat treating, I would suggest you use basically the same design, but only use 1 inch of wool and a thin coating of refractory. Make a flat floor and keep ample
    1 point
  9. 1 point
  10. Thought I would share this little design I came up with, as it has been a game changer for me ! I call it the Jizzer, for obvious reasons when you see the photos The idea of the design was from using Owen Bush's 'Don Fog' 55 gal drum forge many years ago. The beauty of this design is it just requires a standard plumbers propane torch, with a low pressure regulator. I have 'probed' it all round and it is within a couple or 3 degress C ! Ive run it up to 900C (in error) and it did it no harm. The forge will hold temps of a couple or degrees for s
    1 point
  11. In a follow up to another post, I told them that I would tell how I heat treat 80CrV2. I broke a blade after this heat treat and had great grain on it, and it was tough and hard as hell, so here is how I heat treat it. I use my propane forge, a baffle pipe, and a thermocouple so depending on what you use, your results may vary. I do the standard three cycle normalization followed by a quench into Parks 50. I do this at night so I can watch for recalescence. The knife goes into the forge cold, the forge is fired up, and then gets heated to 1600 F slowly. I think this first heat
    1 point
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