Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/03/2020 in all areas

  1. I know we have A LOT of Sax builds on here, so at first I was hesitant to add mine to the pile. I decided there's really not a better group of people to show this to, so here goes I Started With the Intent to go for a Type K Sax from Anne Nørgård Jørgensen's Book, "Waffen und Gräber" since it seemed the most attainable in size and proportions. I thought option #3 had a nice look to it. Traditional Specs OAL (blade+tang): 9.25-12" (23.5-30.5 cm) Blade Length: 7-9.25" (18-23.5cm) Blade Width: 0.82-1.25" (2.2-3.2) I am still learning to forge-weld so I plan
    4 points
  2. It happened! I got a couple of hours forging on sunday - it was a bit Heath Robinson but I made it work. Rough forged 2x Gyuto and 2x nakiri. The forgings were a bit ropey, so tonight I ground the profiles loosely to shape, ready for a refining forge to a geometry that will not be a pita to grind. (5 mins at the hammer is worth an hour at the grinder and all that!) Im keeping a low profile on social media with my current knife forging work as there are people patiently waiting for machines etc and the human condition is they will think I'm ignoring their jobs by having
    3 points
  3. Hey everyone. This is a skinner im making for a fellow bomb loader. I added 20mm brass in the handle again and I think I'm getting better at that. I forged the blade from a Toyota axle. I still need to clean it up, sharpen it and make the sheath. I have big ideas for the sheath but I'm not very good at leather work. I'll post more pics this weekend when I make some progress on the sheath.
    2 points
  4. FWIW here is my take Current Old Stuff - 55lb HF anvil (this is nearly useless. Follow Geoff's or Brian's advice and get something that will actually work as intended) - 4x36 HF belt sander (I still have one of these in my shop and use it frequently for wood surfacing and shaping) - 1x30 HF belt sander (better than no grinder, but it's debatable whether you can do better or faster work with an angle grinder or a good set of files. This grinder will be fine for handle shaping and profiling work) - Leatherworking kit, Amazon cheap special (I don't know what's incl
    2 points
  5. Still using my benchtop model as my primary drill press for 8 years now. If I were building folders, I'd most likely upgrade to a machine shop floor model. Don't be afraid to modify them as needed. I'm talking about both handles and heads. I have a couple of HF hammers that some people think are home forged hammers, when all I did was grind the face into the shape I wanted. I turned a 3# sledge into a ~2 3/4# cross pein, and another one into a similar weight rounding hammer. I'll add here: Don't loose sight of the forest for the trees. We are knifemakers, and th
    2 points
  6. Anvil should be the top. I used the harbor freight ASO for quite a while. You need a new surface to pound on lol. If I could make a suggestion, go to harbor freight and find the biggest sledgehammer you can. Take off the head and sink one end into a five gallon bucket of concrete. You'll be amazed at the difference. People all around the world use basically the same thing when they can't afford or find a full sized anvil.
    2 points
  7. I have two more handles to finish and I will be sat back to watch it as well @Alex Middleton
    1 point
  8. Great job on the blade! While the carving on the handle is nice, the handle itself is out of proportion to the blade. Saxes did tend to have long handles, but they were never wider than the blade, based on what we know from the few surviving sheaths. No biggie, that gives you something to work on for the next one. And I like the soldered brass wire. Just needs to be fitted to the blade to hide the gaps.
    1 point
  9. Thanks again guys! I have invested in safety gear. I must admit that even though I've had a mask/respirator I didn't use it right away. After several nights of blowing powdered steel out of my face in the shower and feeling sick after long stretches of time on the belt sanders, I have learned my lesson. There is also a shard of a dremel cut off wheel stuck the ceiling as a reminder to wear glasses! I've worked on fighter aircraft for a long time so my ears are basically shot but I still wear ear protectors most of the time. I also keep a good fire extinguisher handy during any fire work
    1 point
  10. Good point, @Daniel W. Thanks for putting us back on track. I'd like to edit my answer to say, #1 - hearing, eye and respirator. Knowing what I do now, the first purchase I would have made was a positive air flow respirator. While that would have probably put off other tool purchases for a couple of months, I would have had really good lung protection, and good, comfortable vision which would have saved some mistakes made over the past few years. It's hard to upgrade to something that 'works awesome' when you have something that just 'works'. This is very true!!! Just yest
    1 point
  11. I have only one caveat and yes its the gut-hook lol. Most gut-hooks are kept small, the width of a round file, to keep the fingers from sliding into it if the knife is being supported by the spine. On this one, looks like a finger will be able to slide right in. Other than that, it looks nice! I like the brass accents, and the translucent scales really seem to pop.
    1 point
  12. And don't forge about investing in safety gear, that's the most important thing. You decide to do a lot of grinding get a respirator and understand how to use it. propane forges should come with a CO alarm, and don't forget about your ears! We all kind of take the ringing steel and think it won't do anything to us but over time it will. You will find depending on what work you do, that you will not need the biggest tools. However, when you look to upgrade, Get the best quality you can budget. HF I really try not to buy form them anymore, but sometimes I get snagged and regret it l
    1 point
  13. Really cool Larry. I'm with Gerhard on this one. Never liked using guthooks, but I never thought of widening it out and making it more pronounced. Did the guthooks affect your heat treat plans at all? Tom
    1 point
  14. Well executed guthook, almost good enough to change my opinion on the matter. Great knife :-)
    1 point
  15. Hello Larry, I would recommend getting or making a vise. It will probably be one of the most used tools in your arsenal. You can get by with what you got, but I would listen to what the other guys say. Look up the anvil posts on the forum, it will give you a lot of ideas and check out youtube. "Glen GS Tongs" videos are always good to watch. But most importantly, don't over think it. Makers have been making with far less tools for thousands of years. Tools help the maker, they don't make the maker. Some things that help me: 1) A
    1 point
  16. That thing is wicked!
    1 point
  17. The one acinaces / akinakes that I have handled from the transitional period between bronze age and early iron age, the handles were cast in place around the iron blade. That said, I cant really tell enough about the above photographed one just from the images. Suffice it to say that, as a blade style that spanned from the bronze age up right into the iron age, there were certainly a large number of techniques used in the creation of them.
    1 point
  18. Being that your still starting out, I would put good files as #1. Or at least better files. the HF ones I've past up as they were visually cracked. If you decided to work small and built up, better files can be just as good as a decent belt sander. The difference is time put into the work. A strong #2 is tongs. If you can't hold the work you can't hit the work. Look over at the tools and making board on the forum there's a batch of guides on different ways to make tongs. I've read through them, it's explained well and I have use a few of the methods in there at different times
    1 point
  19. That is simple elegance.
    1 point
  20. Jacek, beautiful sword! Nice clean lines. One question. Is there a reason you made the twists in the guard the same way and not counter to each other? Not a critique, just curious. Doug, check out 8670 for swords and big blades. Just saw a video on AKS website in their 8670 entry of a chef knife they beat through a metal pipe.
    1 point
  21. If you haven't read through this thread on anvils, you should. It might give you some ideas. Geoff
    1 point
  22. That's a very nice clean looking job. I wish that we had a source of EN45 equivalent here in the states but the only source of 9260 we had stopped carrying in a few years back. Doug
    1 point
  23. I made this knife for a military buddy. He's a mechanic on F-15s and I'm a bomb loader. I wanted to make him something special and incorporate something from our military time so I used a couple of fired 20mm brass from an F-15 on this one. This is also my first patina attempt.
    1 point
  24. Sorry, I meant I knew of the books and TV series, I have just never seen them to get an idea of what the sword should look like. It's still nice clean work!
    1 point
  25. Welcome, Larry. If I'm understanding correctly, and your "Current Old Stuff" is the list of what you're planning on upgrading, and looking for suggestions on ranking them, I'd put tongs as the #1 thing, then good files as #2. Depending on your budget and what size blades you want to forge, a larger anvil would be #3, or maybe even #1 and then forge your own tongs as needed. Hope that makes sense. Have fun.
    1 point
  26. Glad you're okay Dave. It's bad enough when a belt breaks, I can't imagine having a wheel blow up. I'll admit, there would probably be something "gooey" in my shorts if that happened to me.
    1 point
  27. Alright, gave it a shot at some scroll-work today. I've got to say, it is a real challenge making crisp lines with all those turns. I've got some serious heel-drag in the tight spots which I seemingly just cant get rid off. I think I need to go back to the basics and practice some flare cuts etc. to get those right at least, then look into this heel drag issue. The shading is also very challenging. I will be pestering the people over at engravingforum.com, engraverscafe.com as well as engravers group on Facebook once I really start digging in
    1 point
  28. Fair enough on the cryo, I can't argue the results! One thing I will clarify, though: scale is not decarb, scale is oxide. Under the scale will be clean steel that has suffered carbon loss to the atmosphere. That's what has to be filed into to hit hard steel again. What happens is the reverse of smelting. In an oxygen-rich atmosphere the oxygen will always be trying to bond with everything it can, which is why stuff rusts even in dry climates. Like all chemical reactions, it happens faster at high temperatures. This is one major reason why commercial heat treaters use gas in
    1 point
  29. 8" Clipped Point Gyuto:Details:- Hand Forged- 760 Layer "Rocky Brook" Mosaic Damascus made from 1080 and 15n20 High Carbon Steels- 8" Blade- 2" Heel- 0 Degree Grind- Recurve Heel for a Comfortable Choked Grip- Clipped point for Added Versatility- Hidden Tang- 5" Octagonal Wa Style Handle made from an Exquisite Specimen of Live Edge Pacific Rhododendron Burl, Copper Spacers, and Lapis Lazuli.- Saya Made from Live Edge Figured Pacific Rhododendron Burl, Copper "Staples", Lapis Lazuli Toggle Pin, Braided and Waxed Cotton Thread, andLeather used to line the opening.- 3000 grit Finish on Blade, Han
    1 point
  30. I worked on one of Neil Burridge's bronze swords, the Wilburton type. I sharpened the edges, including widening the edge bevels to make it more accurate, and brought the finish up to 400 grit. I finished the hilt plates, and oiled them. Next up: sand the blade up to 1000 grit, buff it, make the pommel and assemble it.
    1 point
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...