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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/14/2020 in all areas

  1. I can't say no to free tools. When considering the purchase of a lathe last year, the seller offered to throw in what he called a 'surface grinder' to sweeten the deal . That machine ended up being a Fox Machine Co. horizontal mill from the turn of the century, and it's turned out to be a remarkably useful implement. Yes, I love to do things by hand as much as the next craftsman, but there's nearly equal satisfaction in using a 130 year old piece of machinery that rolled off the foundry floor when swords were still being carried as sidearms. Blade fullers were never
    6 points
  2. So you're saying. . . there are people who do?????
    2 points
  3. Put the sheath together today. The color scheme and hammer finished came out like I wanted, but the fit on some of the brass got messed up. There was only one fitting that came out acceptable on the first try, and there are still a couple that I need to mess with some more. Overall though, I am pretty tickled with my first attempt.
    2 points
  4. 1080 /15N20 crushed W's laddered steel,stainless fittings and stabilized maple burl The finished knife
    1 point
  5. Hi. I just finished my latest project. It is a replica of an early medieval (Viking Age) spearhead. It is a reconstruction of the find from Ciepłe (Poland). It is completely made of bloomery iron. I have used 3 kinds of materials: soft low carbon iron smelted from hematite ore, high carbon steel I made in Aristotle furnace, and high phosphorus low carbon iron smelted from bog ore. The socket is a wrap and welded. The pattern-welded twist bars are welded on both sides of the spear core. To weld twist pattern billets I used high carbon steel and P-iron, cutting edge is steel, socket and core is
    1 point
  6. I took a couple of days off work to spend time with Jim Austin in Oakland and take his axe forging class. The objective was to transform the bar of steel into that axe head: This is basically all forging work without really much grinding and or filing afterwards. We made two axes and here is the one I made (under Jim's excellent tutelage): If you are interested, I can also post some photos from all the forging stages.
    1 point
  7. I was recently gifted a knife vice, much better than my current one (also a gift), and when I asked what I did to deserve it I was told "just paying it forward", so I undertook to do the same. One of my colleagues' son is a "knife obsessed" 12-year old, I know they're going through a tough spot so I've had the idea of offering for him to come make his own knife for a while. An appropriate time to make the offer presented itself and the reaction from the boy makes me happy I did. I was that knife obsessed boy, but I never had an opportunity like this or access to information t
    1 point
  8. That sounds like it would look really good.
    1 point
  9. Found this image on a google image search for axe sheath. It links back to “craft and lore“ on tumblr but I can’t find it there. Quite a few ideas on the google search. Hope it helps getting the creative flowing.
    1 point
  10. . Hello how are you! I haven't posted any work for a long time, but we finished several commissions during the time of the pandemic. little by little I will upload material to share! Medusa is a typical one-handed sword from the early Renaissance, with a type XV blade of the Oakeshott classification, very popular in the middle and late fourteenth century, its use reaching the fifteenth century. Its guard has spatulate beds, openwork with a Gothic trefoil, an ornamental shape composed of the outline of three superimposed rings, very popular at the time, used in Gothic tracery, heraldry, il
    1 point
  11. Last year I did a set of three skinners for a customer and he immediately ordered three more. Apologies for the pathetic photography, but here's what I came up with: I used 1084, bone slabs with G-10 liners, and brass pins. 600 grit finish. Sheaths were hand sewn, stained with iron acetate, sealed with bee's wax. This is not my preferred style of knife, but this is probably the best fit & finish I have pulled off to date. The whole duplication thing is not really so
    1 point
  12. Hardy with fuller shaped, ready for the heat treat. Fits in the 3/4 hardy hole on the baby anvil. Tooling up for finishing my charcoal chopper. Ball punch and slot punch shaped ready for the heat treat. Tooling up for making a bottle opener. Why you ask? Because I deserve a beer. That's why.
    1 point
  13. Hi All Little Pattern welded hunter, I lost track of the amount of layers but around the 570, full tapered tang construction, brass bolster, Black Maire (NZ native) handle. Total length 23 cm, blade 11 cm
    1 point
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