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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/19/2020 in all areas

  1. First forging session in my new shop! got these 8 blades done in pre-laminated stainless clad super blue. The bigger Gyutos are 250 mm edge length. They are heat treated and ready for grinding now. I have ground the profiles after forging, but the bevels and distal tapers are as forged. The forging is reasonably clean, so I'm hopeful i can get away with lower bevel only grinding (quicker, I dont like grinding much), and Kurouchi finish for the rest. The spines, and choils etc were finished prior to heat treat. I owe s
    6 points
  2. Nice note to finish the week on with the bolsters all riveted on, handles fitted and drilled ready for the glue up which I thought would have to be next week but a bit of a push saw them all in the clamps even though I had to double up the steak knife sets in non strandard knife clamps.
    3 points
  3. Looking at the first trial of Oroshigane ( see picture below ), the carbon content is higher than first thought somewhere between 1% carbon and 2 % carbon. Todays run yielded 4 lbs of very high carbon steel at a yield of 80% as 5 lbs of flattened bloom iron were processed. No attempt was made to sort the input of the process by carbon content. Fragments were wire brushed, cut to no larger than 2.5 inches in any direction and no thicker than 5/16 inches.,See picture below. The bloom was attached to the furnace wall which was damaged during extracting. I will be running
    3 points
  4. This post is a record of my attempt at getting some rework done ..either to another form and/or to another carbon content. Emiliano's post on refining steel in a hearth furnace inspired me to start the process . Thank you Emiliano. Maybe my expectations of the oroshigane process are too big..as I have some materials that will be difficult to work with...I may have to adjust the furnace rather than just the bottom. I have to do some reading about the role of Phosphorous in steel of varying carbon concentrations. Mark Green showed a white etch on low carbon steel ( iron ) ...in my mind I
    1 point
  5. This is a pinned thread, so I don't feel bad adding to it so long after the last post. I recently had the "opportunity" (it was necessary) to run a couple chunks of RR track on the spectrometer for work. They both came out as 1060. C~0.62 | Mn~0.73 | Si~0.11 | P~0.026 | S~0.030 | Cr~0.02 | Ni~0.06 | Cu~0.26 | Mo,V,Al, all else<0.01
    1 point
  6. I've been working on hamons for close to 20 years, and get the result I'm hoping for maybe 1 in 10. That looks perfectly fine to me - you're not going to get anything flashier with that steel. There looks to be plenty of activity that could be brought out, so you can use it for polishing an etching practice, but there's no mileage in going for a full art polish on a kitchen knife that's going to get used, in my opinion. If it were me, I'd give it a longish soak in ferric to get some contrast and just let the natural patina develop from there.
    1 point
  7. Great stuff Josh I am enjoying this. You have got me inspired but 40c and 78% humidity just put a dampener on it.
    1 point
  8. I cut the goobers off today to check consolidation and carbon content. The bar laughed at my band saw and I moved to the angle grinder with a cut-off wheel. The end grain is still pretty porous. I will do another welding heat to consolidate the bar. Hopefully, the carbon content will not depreciate significantly.
    1 point
  9. hmmm....which way should I go with this.... ....probably best to just lave it be, then.
    1 point
  10. Got my copy of The Master Bladesmith today. Time to tuck in and figure out how much I dont know.
    1 point
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